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NEWS
August 7, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
"Adderly" is hopelessly silly, completely implausible, irredeemably low- rent - and, somehow, still manages to appeal in a shambling, pokey way. It seems appropriate that this shaggy dog of a spy series has been allowed during the remaining dog days of summer to emerge from deep within CBS' late- night caverns for some prime-time exposure. Like "Night Heat," which began its own prime-time run last Tuesday, "Adderly" is a Canadian-produced series that found its audience among the insomniacs who tend to dodge those twin towers of the 11:30 p.m. time-slot, Ted Koppel and Johnny Carson.
LIVING
November 26, 1996 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
My Russian assistant Sergei had the telephone open and its guts spread across the desk when my husband stopped by my office unexpectedly late one evening. Startled, Sergei leapt back as if he had touched a hot stove. My husband, Ken, paused for an instant, expecting some explanation. But Sergei kept silent. Only as Ken was leaving the building did epiphany strike: He had once seen telephones opened like that on TV. In the endless loop of spy shows that dominated my husband's Cold War childhood, Russian bad guys were forever planting their amazingly tiny, amazingly powerful listening devices in the Americans' telephones, thus enabling their English-fluent operatives to enjoy uninterrupted, static-free reception.
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | BY MARY MCGRORY
Lucky for Robert Owen that condescension is not an actionable offense. If it were, Oliver North's 33-year-old courier would be in danger of the law. Owen, a Rhode Island-born Stanford graduate, is the yuppie as secret agent, a preppy white-collar freedom fighter, and he looked down his elegantly chiseled nose at the members of the House-Senate select committee investigating the Iran-Contra affair who ventured to question his fly-by-night activities...
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He never served on Her Majesty's Secret Service. He never transported sensitive government files or saved the free world from destruction. But his name was Bond. James Bond. And for most of his life, the Philadelphia ornithologist who grew up in Gwynedd would be compared - for better or worse - to Agent 007, the character novelist Ian Fleming named after him. The man who will forever be known as the real-life James Bond is the subject of a new book, to be released this week, by David R. Contosta of Plymouth.
NEWS
August 23, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
It's a wonderful day for TV, but only if you enjoy cult shows or football. DAYTIME HIGHLIGHT BLAKE'S 7 (3:30 p.m., Ch. 12) - This sci-fi series was billed as Britain's answer to Star Trek. If so, it was a very slow reply. Blake's 7, a sort of Magnificent Seven in outer space, didn't premiere on BBC until nine years after Star Trek was canceled. It was a hit there, fast achieving Dr. Who-style cult status, but survived only three seasons. Like Space: 1999, which preceded it, Blake's 7 told of a group of reluctant travelers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
You don't have to believe all the claims made for the artistic virtues of The Prisoner to have fun with The Prisoner Video Companion (55 minutes, $19.98) from MPI Home Video. If you're an admirer of the British TV series - first broadcast here as a summer replacement on CBS in 1968 and 1969 - you'll enjoy being reminded of how strange and original a show it was. If you've never seen it, you couldn't wish for a more enthusiastic introduction - although the video can be accused of spoiling a good many of the surprises.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012 | By Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers
A tough kitty and an accidental secret agent are at the top of this week's DVD releases. Puss in Boots, Grade B-plus: Antonio Banderas' brilliant voice performance makes Puss a star. It's not just hearing macho words coming from such a small character that works - it's the actor's performance. He sells this script with the enthusiasm of a telemarketer on speed. Salma Hayek also provides verbal punch. Her first foray into voice work is the cat's meow. In a hard combination to get right, she delivers power while giving the character a softer edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* MARVEL'S AGENT CARTER 8 tonight, 6ABC. If there's overlap between fans of PBS' "The Bletchley Circle" and Marvel's "Avengers," I hope it finds its way to ABC's new "Marvel's Agent Carter," whose two-hour premiere tonight is actually pretty marvelous. Set in 1946, the "Captain America" spinoff stars Hayley Atwell as Peggy Carter, a secret agent still in mourning for her presumably lost love, Steve "Captain America" Rogers (Chris Evans) and dealing with some of the same adjustments as the "Bletchley" cryptographers (and a lot of other women who found their talents pushed aside once World War II was over)
LIVING
January 19, 1986 | By Anne Eaton, Special to The Inquirer
"Got a problem?" the classified ad asks. "Odds against you? Call the Equalizer. " Who is the Equalizer? Is he a free-lance mathematician? A moonlighting social worker? A bookie who makes house calls? None of the above. The Equalizer, a.k.a. Robert McCall, is a newly retired secret agent who has decided to go public. His license says only that he's a security guard, but that's as much of an understatement as calling President Reagan a civil servant. As portrayed by veteran British actor Edward Woodward on CBS's series The Equalizer (Wednesday nights at 10, Ch. 10)
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
First, the good news. Bill Cosby's "Leonard Part 6" isn't as bad as you might have heard it is, or as you might have heard Cosby thinks it is. (According to one particularly mean rumor, Cosby offered Coca-Cola, the parent company of Columbia Pictures, which released the film, $10 million and a specified number of complementary Coke commercials if they would keep "Leonard" in the can forever.) Of course, it isn't good, either. Probably the best thing about it is its length - just 82 minutes, which isn't long enough for the movie's arch humor, its monumentally silly plot (about an archfiend named Medusa Johnson who wants to take over the world by controlling the behavior of animals)
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* MARVEL'S AGENT CARTER 8 tonight, 6ABC. If there's overlap between fans of PBS' "The Bletchley Circle" and Marvel's "Avengers," I hope it finds its way to ABC's new "Marvel's Agent Carter," whose two-hour premiere tonight is actually pretty marvelous. Set in 1946, the "Captain America" spinoff stars Hayley Atwell as Peggy Carter, a secret agent still in mourning for her presumably lost love, Steve "Captain America" Rogers (Chris Evans) and dealing with some of the same adjustments as the "Bletchley" cryptographers (and a lot of other women who found their talents pushed aside once World War II was over)
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Laurie Kellman and Alicia A. Caldwell, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Embarrassed by a prostitution scandal, the Secret Service will assign chaperones on some trips to enforce new rules of conduct that make clear that excessive drinking, entertaining foreigners in hotel rooms, and cavorting in disreputable establishments are no longer tolerated. The stricter measures, issued by the Secret Service on Friday for agents and employees, apply even when traveling personnel are off duty. The policies, outlined in a memorandum obtained by the Associated Press, are the agency's latest attempt to respond to the scandal that surfaced as President Obama was headed to a Latin American summit in Cartagena, Colombia, earlier this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012 | By Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers
A tough kitty and an accidental secret agent are at the top of this week's DVD releases. Puss in Boots, Grade B-plus: Antonio Banderas' brilliant voice performance makes Puss a star. It's not just hearing macho words coming from such a small character that works - it's the actor's performance. He sells this script with the enthusiasm of a telemarketer on speed. Salma Hayek also provides verbal punch. Her first foray into voice work is the cat's meow. In a hard combination to get right, she delivers power while giving the character a softer edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
IN "THIS Means War," two secret agents use their spy-craft to compete for a perky blonde. Sounds like a classic Hollywood screwball comedy setup. Throw in attractive stars Reese Witherspoon, Chris Pine, Tom Hardy, flip a few SUVs, and what could go wrong? Well, you could hire a director like McG, who made his reputation, such as it is, with the "Charlie's Angels" movies, then tried making movies about actual humans with "We Are Marshall. " That turned out to be phenomenally unprofitable, so he's back in "Angel's" mode here - candy-colored, light show set to pounding, ceaseless house music.
NEWS
September 20, 2010
IT WAS THE '30s and the Russians, soon to be our World War II allies, began stealing everything, moonbeams if they could, while the FBI was consumed with chasing Charles Dillinger and Bonnie and Clyde. Before J. Edgar Hoover awakened, the Soviets had set up a massive spy network and the damage had been done. At the heart of the conspiracy was a South Philadelphian who became one of Russia's most important and diligent spies, according to Allen M. Hornblum's richly researched book, The Invisible Harry Gold: The Man Who Gave the Soviets the Atom Bomb . Gold was a nebbish, a pudgy, intellectual do-gooder who became involved as a favor to a friend who had helped his impoverished family at the depth of the Depression.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | by John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Investigators were trying to figure out what possessed a mild-mannered accountant to fire shots outside the White House yesterday. Federal agents searched the Evansville, Ind., home of Robert W. Pickett, 47, and interviewed many who knew him trying to discover some clue to his erratic and uncharacteristic behavior. Although Pickett had a history of mental illness, had tried suicide and would occasionally disappear for weeks at a time, he had no record of violence. His way of striking out against the many enemies that plagued him had always been to file lawsuits.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A squad leader in the U.S. Secret Service's Philadelphia office is accused of stealing about $2,800 that other agents had seized during two separate criminal investigations. Michael Cohen, 37, of Boothwyn, Delaware County, lost his job in March and was indicted yesterday by a federal grand jury on charges of theft, making false statements, obstruction of justice and witness tampering. "I think they give it a distorted and inaccurate picture of what actually happened," said defense attorney Robert N. de Luca, referring to the charges.
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Fanning Wickham Bond, 99, best-selling author, artist, and a socialite who learned to play craps on the marble steps of the Bellevue Stratford and became the wife of the legendary James Bond's namesake, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at her home in Chestnut Hill. Mrs. Bond was indeed the wife of the James Bond whose name Ian Fleming made famous as Agent 007, but her James was not the international spy. He was an ornithologist, and the author of Birds of the West Indies.
LIVING
November 26, 1996 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
My Russian assistant Sergei had the telephone open and its guts spread across the desk when my husband stopped by my office unexpectedly late one evening. Startled, Sergei leapt back as if he had touched a hot stove. My husband, Ken, paused for an instant, expecting some explanation. But Sergei kept silent. Only as Ken was leaving the building did epiphany strike: He had once seen telephones opened like that on TV. In the endless loop of spy shows that dominated my husband's Cold War childhood, Russian bad guys were forever planting their amazingly tiny, amazingly powerful listening devices in the Americans' telephones, thus enabling their English-fluent operatives to enjoy uninterrupted, static-free reception.
NEWS
February 24, 1996 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Spy or counterspy? Patriot or money-grubbing wartime traitor? Check or checkmate? Such were the buzz words that emerged yesterday like phantoms from the Cold War in a John Le Carre novel when the FBI busted the first alleged spy ever to be charged in Philadelphia with espionage. The defendant, Robert Stephen Lipka, 50, a pear-shaped, owlish-faced, unemployed but wealthy coin dealer and investment whiz from Lancaster County, is accused of selling classified information to the Soviets in the mid-1960s.
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