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Secret Ballot

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NEWS
May 30, 1993 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With contract negotiations at an impasse, the vice president of the Penn- Delco school board wants the teachers to vote by secret ballot on the board's proposal to cut salaries by 3.85 percent. At the board meeting Wednesday night, vice president Janice Hutt urged Linda Cook, president of the teachers' association, to ask for the secret ballot vote at the union's June meeting next week. Hutt announced that the teachers' union had submitted a counterproposal that called for a 5.5 percent increase in the first year, and 6 percent increases for each of the next two years.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
James O. Pickard, a Republican candidate for governor, called yesterday for the Republican State Committee to change its endorsement rules in a way he acknowledged could improve his slim chances of winning the party's backing. Pickard's proposals - to hold a candidates' forum and a secret ballot for endorsements - were announced at a hastily called Capitol news conference just four days before the GOP is scheduled to meet to endorse a gubernatorial candidate. It isn't expected to choose Pickard.
SPORTS
July 27, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Get the ballot boxes ready. More than 400 players who appeared in NBA games this season have gotten clearance to decide their own fate. That happened when Daniel Silverman, the New York regional director of the National Labor Relations Board, established the ground rules for the players to vote on whether they should decertify the National Basketball Players Association as their collective bargaining representative. Silverman said the vote should be conducted by secret ballot at regional NLRB offices, either in late August or early September.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The campaign for the Towamencin Township Board of Supervisors, which had unwound uneventfully over the summer, twisted into a couple of knots last week. The local Republican committee conducted a secret ballot Tuesday night that showed that the majority of its 13 members are supporting Edward Furman and Charles Policastro, the incumbents who lost the primary in the spring and are running as write-in candidates. Helen Dunigan, a committee member, said the vote was taken to ensure that the Towamencin voters "get the information straight.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
Administrative Judge Nelson A. Diaz wants the Board of Common Pleas Judges to consider waiving the board's secret-ballot provisions when it elects an interim district attorney tomorrow. In a letter to President Judge Edward J. Blake yesterday, Diaz said some unidentified judges had asked him to voice their opinion that the judges should be held "accountable" for their votes through an "open roll call. " Other judges, who asked the Daily News to withhold their names, attacked Diaz's letter as "intimidation" aimed at those who intend to vote against Judge Russell M. Nigro, the choice of Democratic Party Chairman Bob Brady.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
They've got candidates they view as star-quality and lots of money, but when members of the Republican State Committee gather here this weekend, the meeting will not be a total Valentine's Day lovefest. At issue is a proposed change in committee bylaws that would allow committee members to vote by secret ballot, rather than in public, on endorsements and other matters. The party is expected to endorse Gov. Ridge and Lt. Gov. Mark Schweiker for a second term and U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter for a fourth term tomorrow.
NEWS
October 20, 2004 | By Janice Hatfield Young
If the secret ballot is so sacrosanct, why do so many people want to know how we're voting? It seems that everyone from Karl Rove to our next-door neighbor is curious about how we'll vote in this election. The only thing more annoying is when pollsters and pundits assume they know how people or groups of people, such as last election's soccer moms and this year's security moms, will vote. Even family members assume they know exactly how we'll vote, which reminds me of the November 2000 election.
SPORTS
September 14, 2005 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's just a coincidence, but the morning after Ted Saskin temporarily stepped aside as executive director of the NHL Players' Association, one of his strongest supporters, Flyers' player representative Robert Esche, resigned his post as well. Saskin stepped aside Monday night to allow the players' union to conduct a secret-ballot vote on choosing its new leader. On Sept. 1, Saskin was voted in by conference call instead of secret ballot, over the objections of players. He received a four-year contract and two-year option.
NEWS
August 3, 2004 | By CHARLIE NORWOOD
THE DIFFERENCES between residents of my home state of Georgia and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania are too many to list. But one pastime we share this time of year is keeping an eye on the National League standings - though I suspect our allegiances are quite different. A more serious shared interest can be described in one word: jobs. The fact is, keeping hard-working Americans employed is important to all of us regardless of where we call home. As chairman of the House Education and Workforce Committee's subcommittee on workforce protection, I have a particularly strong interest in the availability of jobs for all workers - and the role that plays in growing our national economy.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Evesham committeeman Greg Sobocinski's crusade to change the way Republicans in Burlington County nominate people for county and state offices was met with boos and heckling yesterday as fellow committee members overwhelmingly affirmed Delran Council member Jim Wujcik as the next freeholder. Sobocinksi had wanted the position himself, but opted not to submit an application to the three-person screening panel that selected Wujcik. The panel, headed by committee chairman Glenn Paulsen, chooses all nominees for county and state offices, and then the committee votes yes or no on each.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 27, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
BEFORE THE well-deserved inductions of Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine into the Baseball Hall of Fame last month, an old, familiar advertisement from 1998 made the rounds on the various social-media platforms of the day. "Chicks dig the long ball" was a Nike campaign that took off, thanks, in large part, to the deadpan deliveries of the two everyman-looking Cy Young arms, who, after watching women fawn over the batting-practice blasts of Mark McGwire,...
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
There had been, in the words of Democratic Party Chairman Bob Brady, "a whole lot of hollering and screaming" this year about knocking off some of the city's longtime Democratic ward leaders. But Monday night, at the quadrennial gatherings to pick the party's 69 ward leaders, only one incumbent was tossed out in a contested race, as U.S. Rep. Brady noted. That doesn't mean peace reigned. Ward leaders can play pivotal roles on election day, and control of their fiefdoms can spark nasty battles.
NEWS
November 21, 2010 | By Paul Davies, Inquirer Columnist
Has State Rep. Dwight Evans jumped the shark? He has long been considered one of the good guys in Harrisburg, a policy wonk brimming with ideas and pushing for positive change. Evans has supported public school reform and the Convention Center expansion, and he was instrumental in bringing former Police Commissioner John Timoney to Philadelphia. More recently, he has helped lure supermarkets to urban neighborhoods. But critics say Evans has also become more detached and caught up in the trappings of power.
NEWS
July 26, 2009 | By Kevin Ferris
In March, it seemed the pro-union legislation known as "card check" was dead - thanks in part to Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.). Before that, Specter had been coy about the Employee Free Choice Act. He'd voted to allow a debate on the measure in 2007, without commenting on the substance. In March, he had two main concerns: (1) card check, where workers sign cards to indicate support for a union instead of holding a secret-ballot election, and (2) the potential harm of increasing costs to businesses in a recession.
NEWS
May 28, 2009 | By Michael J. Goldberg
After last fall's election, unions had high hopes for labor-law reform. But even with the eventual addition of Minnesota's Al Franken to the Democratic ranks in the Senate, there won't be a filibuster-proof majority in support of the Employee Free Choice Act. Already, a half-dozen or so Democratic senators, including Delaware's Tom Carper and the newly converted Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, have indicated they won't support the current bill....
NEWS
March 26, 2009 | By Rick Santorum
The last time it was the Republicans' turn to capture the governor's mansion, the year was 1994. Turn? Yes, every eight years since Pennsylvania's constitution has permitted governors to run for a second term, no incumbent has failed to win reelection, and no member of the incumbent's party has won a campaign for an open governor's office. So all Republican eyes should be riveted to the primary race for governor, right? Not quite - thanks to the eclectic voting record of Sen. Arlen Specter.
NEWS
March 25, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Jane Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.) said yesterday that he would oppose legislation making it easier for workers to form unions, dealing a severe blow to organized labor's top political priority as he faces a 2010 primary challenge from the right. Union leaders were counting on Specter to be the 60th vote needed to stop an expected GOP filibuster of the Employee Free Choice Act later this year. He was the lone Senate Republican to support consideration of the measure in 2007, when it stalled in the Senate.
NEWS
March 16, 2009 | By JAMES WALTERS AND MATTHEW SIMPSON
RECENTLY, an AFL-CIO official wrote that the Employee Free Choice Act would "restore America's workers' freedom to choose to come together to bargain for a better life. " Nothing could be further from the truth. The centerpiece of the act is the elimination of government-run secret-ballot union elections. And by stripping employees of the fundamental right to cast a private vote for or against union representation, the Employee Free Choice Act undermines the very principles of a free and democratic society, and only robs employees of their vital "freedom to choose.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In one recent television spot, actors playing union thugs join a hapless worker in his private polling booth to let him know just how to vote - presumably "yes" on whether his workplace should be unionized. To the chagrin of organized labor, the "secret ballot" issue dominates such business advertisements against the Employee Free Choice Act - passage of which is a top priority this year for unions. Business interests are equally adamant about defeating it. Less publicity surrounds two other major provisions of the proposed act - one calling for binding arbitration in stalled contract negotiations, and another that would stiffen penalties for violations of federal labor law. The binding-arbitration provision is truly distasteful to business, said James A. Craft, professor of business administration at the University of Pittsburgh's Katz Graduate School of Business.
NEWS
December 30, 2008 | By Pat Toomey
The nation's most powerful labor unions have been lobbying heavily for a law, misleadingly named the Employee Free Choice Act, that would take away workers' basic rights to a secret-ballot vote on union representation. It would allow unions to organize through a poorly regulated "card-check" process instead. Many politicians have been falsely characterizing the card-check law as an essential part of an economic-recovery program. In reality, it would deepen the recession. Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter is the only Republican who has joined the Democratic senators voting to advance the legislation.
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