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Secret Garden

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NEWS
May 13, 1991 | By Clifford A. Ridley, Inquirer Theater Critic
The word out of New York is that they're busy pruning the ghosts from The Secret Garden. I suppose that's a good idea. The ghosts - the shades of little Mary Lennox's long-dead aunt, wife to her gloomy Uncle Archie, and of all the adults who died in the cholera epidemic that made Mary an orphan and brought her to England - probably were baffling to small children. And small children are a large part of the potential audience for this just-opened show at the St. James Theater, which has been adapted by librettist Marsha Norman and composer Lucy Simon from the classic children's novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine this: A sour, spoiled little girl comes to live in a dreary old mansion. She finds a pretty garden and begins to take an interest in things. She befriends a cheery little fellow who has squirrels and other animals for friends, and her attitude improves even more. Then she comes across a crippled, tyrannical, sick little boy. She and her new buddy get him into the garden and - surprise! - he learns to walk. Would anyone in his right mind buy this saccharine, nauseatingly predictable tale?
FOOD
October 6, 2011
Tucked away down a narrow Old City alley, the garden patio behind Wedge + Fig is one of the loveliest local pocket hideaways in which to while away the last warm days over panini and salad. Formerly a cheese shop (and a bakery before that), this light-bite boutique from one-time sailmakers Kirk Nelson and Lisa Ruff features the culinary talents of Rebecca Torpie, the former chef-owner of Flying Monkey. There are baked goods reminiscent of her cupcake days (lemon bars, macaroons)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
At the Arden Theatre, a rich array of local acting talent is cultivating The Secret Garden , the Marsha Norman/Lucy Simon musical, innovatively co-conceived by Jorge Cousineau and company artistic director Terrence J. Nolen. In the show, based on Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1911 novel, vocal powerhouses Jeffrey Coon, Alex Keiper, and Steve Pacek sing of illness, loneliness, and neglect in the setting of a gloomy Yorkshire estate in the early years of the 20th century. Each Philadelphia thespian has showstopping moments of Celtic pop song.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Growing up in Poland, Agnieszka Holland read Frances Hodgson Burnett's turn-of-the-century children's classic, The Secret Garden. And read it again, and again. "And then, when my daughter was the right age, I read it to her, and I remembered the book very, very well," recalls the filmmaker, who makes her Hollywood studio debut with The Secret Garden, which opened around the country Friday. "And when I read the first version of this script, I could immediately find what was not accurate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Diane C. Lade, SUN SENTINEL
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The kitchen features a hutch with lovely antique blue-and-white plates. One bathroom has a walk-in shower. And lounge chairs surround a good-sized shaded pool in the back. So what makes this seven-bedroom property different from other large homes nearby? It's South Florida's first gay retirement home. Tom Duffy, a retired catering business owner, converted what once was a small Wilton Manors assisted-living facility to create his dream: Secret Garden, an independent living center where gay men can be themselves as they age. "I want it to be like a family, more like a commune, I guess," said Duffy, 61, who lives on the property and has been interviewing prospective residents in recent weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
I don't think they've got The Secret Garden clarified just yet. "No, no, they're all dead people," a woman patiently explained to her male companion during opening-night intermission at the Playhouse Theatre, where the Marsha Norman-Lucy Simon musical is in residence through Saturday. She meant the ghosts that drift in and out of Norman's adaptation of the 1911 Frances Hodgson Burnett novel - specters that troubled the original Broadway production and, despite extensive revisions in the interim, haunt the road company as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In shimmering lacy gowns, ghosts of the dead waltz across the stage, while their survivors sing mournfully of how much they are missed. Meanwhile, a sourpuss of a little girl, with some help from a Yorkshire-speaking robin, a country boy named Dickon and a curmudgeonly older servant, slowly nurses a garden back to life. If The Secret Garden, a musical tale of loss and recovery, is not exactly action-packed, that's no accident, one member of its all-female creative team explained recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
On a gray day in January, the moment has come to unlock the garden gate. Director, conductor, designer and singers with scores in hand gather in an empty Chestnut Street storefront to breathe life into The Secret Garden, an opera that has been gestating for three years in a process devised by the Pennsylvania Opera Theater (TPOT). The singers sit in a semicircle with coffee cups and tape recorders ranged in front of them. Stage-staff members take notes as director Michael Montel talks the singers through scenes and acts while designer Anita Stewart, working a scale model of the stage, shows where shrubs and trees will stand, where bed and table, garden doors and stairs will be - and where glasses of water may be hidden for the singers during performance.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By Bill Chenevert, FOR DO THIS
It is said that Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote The Secret Garden after the death of her 16-year-old son, and its macabre magic still resonates 100 years later. Mary Lennox is a protagonist whose irritating coldness melts before your very eyes - she's a strange little girl. But in the Arden Theatre's version of the musical adaptation, director Terry Nolen and scenic and video designer Jorge Cousineau have imbued Mary and her story with joy that the novel only grazes. Marsha Norman's book and lyrics and the music of Lucy Simon (Carly's sister)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016
The Secret Garden opens Tuesday and runs through June 19 at the Arden Theatre, 40 N. 2nd St. Tickets: $15-$42. Information: 215-922-1122, ardentheatre.org
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016
The long: Fans of Harry Potter and The Chronicles of Narnia will fall for this musical rendition of Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1911 English tale of an orphaned 10-year-old who goes to live with an unhappy hermit uncle in an imposing mansion on the moors to discover new friends, a locked garden, and total redemption. The short: Catch Pa. native Tony-winner 13-year-old Bailey Ryon before she takes over Broadway. (Wait. She already did that.) The demo: Ages 10 and up. The length: 2.5 hours, including intermission.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
At the Arden Theatre, a rich array of local acting talent is cultivating The Secret Garden , the Marsha Norman/Lucy Simon musical, innovatively co-conceived by Jorge Cousineau and company artistic director Terrence J. Nolen. In the show, based on Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1911 novel, vocal powerhouses Jeffrey Coon, Alex Keiper, and Steve Pacek sing of illness, loneliness, and neglect in the setting of a gloomy Yorkshire estate in the early years of the 20th century. Each Philadelphia thespian has showstopping moments of Celtic pop song.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2015 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Martin Schneider didn't go to the Tattooed Mom on a recent Sunday afternoon for football-watching or pool-playing. The 27-year-old took a friend to drink cider on tap - and to color. "I appreciate going to a relaxing place where people can get together and make art of varying quality, even for someone like me who isn't artistically inclined," said Schneider, of South Philly. The bar in Queen Village draws 50 to 100 people between noon and midnight on any given Sunday to color - sometimes original illustrations by local artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Diane C. Lade, SUN SENTINEL
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The kitchen features a hutch with lovely antique blue-and-white plates. One bathroom has a walk-in shower. And lounge chairs surround a good-sized shaded pool in the back. So what makes this seven-bedroom property different from other large homes nearby? It's South Florida's first gay retirement home. Tom Duffy, a retired catering business owner, converted what once was a small Wilton Manors assisted-living facility to create his dream: Secret Garden, an independent living center where gay men can be themselves as they age. "I want it to be like a family, more like a commune, I guess," said Duffy, 61, who lives on the property and has been interviewing prospective residents in recent weeks.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Lise Funderburg
My yard is barely visible from the sidewalk, thanks to a snaggle of untamed evergreens atop a four-foot-high retaining wall. But behind that ragged urban barrier, the property opens out onto a surprising double-lot expanse of serpentine flowerbeds, an oasis of hammocks and bluestone patios, cedar pergolas and grassy terraces. An oversized cast-iron smoker hugs the fence line (on standby for twice yearly pig roasts), and the parking pad in front of the garage has been known to serve as a temporary abattoir, which is a nice word for describing what happens when my husband takes a Sawzall to the deer he gets from bow hunter culls of nearby parks.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When devoted gardeners run out space in their backyards, they often tear up the old plantings to make room for the new. But Andrew Bunting, a horticulturist with a magazine-worthy ornamental garden behind his ivy-covered stone cottage in Swarthmore, had a different idea. In January, he asked neighbors Clair and Rob Oaks, with whom he had a cordial but not close relationship, if he could use a section of their backyard for a vegetable garden that they would share. He would design, install, and cultivate the plot, and even pay them $100 a month in rent.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lisa Butler has herself quite a haul: six mums, two asters, one anemone, and two pumpkins, all chosen from the attractive seasonal displays at Secret Garden, the Roxborough plant nursery near her Andorra home. "I love my mums," she says. "They're a beautiful fall flower. " And you can't miss them these days. The breeding and mass-marketing of fall garden-variety mums, begun in the 1980s, has reached the saturation point in 2011. You'll find them for as little as $2 apiece, not just at garden centers and big-box stores, but at supermarkets, discount outlets, seasonal pop-ups, and gas stations, too. Here's why: Mums provide one of the only blasts of color for the year-end garden.
FOOD
October 6, 2011
Tucked away down a narrow Old City alley, the garden patio behind Wedge + Fig is one of the loveliest local pocket hideaways in which to while away the last warm days over panini and salad. Formerly a cheese shop (and a bakery before that), this light-bite boutique from one-time sailmakers Kirk Nelson and Lisa Ruff features the culinary talents of Rebecca Torpie, the former chef-owner of Flying Monkey. There are baked goods reminiscent of her cupcake days (lemon bars, macaroons)
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