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NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - The Egyptian military on Monday assumed joint responsibility with the police for security and protecting state institutions until the results of a Dec. 15 constitutional referendum are announced. The army took up the task in line with a decree issued Sunday by President Mohammed Morsi. The Islamist leader on Monday also suspended a series of tax hikes announced the previous day on alcohol, cigarettes, and other items. The presidential edict orders the military and police to jointly maintain security in the run-up to Saturday's vote on the disputed charter, which was hurriedly approved last month by a panel dominated by the president's Islamist allies despite a boycott of the committee's liberal, secular, and Christian members.
NEWS
May 22, 1986
It is ironic that in his May 14 Letter to the Editor Noah Barsky defends President Reagan's "Star Wars" program saying that the longer it is delayed, the longer it will be before we Americans have a "sense of security" from nuclear attack. That's all anyone can hope to have from this program: A sense of security. Clearly we will not have genuine security, because not even the President's most ardent advocates are willing to commit to the idea that we would be 100 percent secure from attack with this system.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
Greg Kern, the Philadelphia Housing Authority's acting executive director, thinks he has signed an all-star. Dorothy Cousins, the first woman inspector of the city Police Department and the first female chief of county detectives, is the authority's first female security director. Cousins, who started working at the authority this week at an annual salary of $49,500, will run a stronger security department. Unlike her predecessor, Eugene O'Neill, who will stay on as director of investigations, Cousins will report directly to the authority's executive director.
SPORTS
September 15, 2001 | By Jim Salisbury and Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
When the Phillies resume play Monday with the first of four games against the Atlanta Braves, fans no longer will be allowed to bring coolers, backpacks or large bags into Veterans Stadium under a new policy announced yesterday by Major League Baseball. "Fans should expect a close inspection upon entry," Michael R. Stiles, Phillies vice president for operations and administration, said yesterday. "We're going to have a heightened security effort, and that may account for a delay in fans being admitted," he said.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Ahmed Al Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - A masked gunman assassinated a Yemeni security official who worked for the U.S. Embassy in a drive-by shooting Thursday in the capital, officials said, adding that the assault bore the hallmarks of al-Qaeda's Yemen branch. The attack comes amid a sharp deterioration of security in Yemen and several other Muslim countries since the collapse of police states controlled by autocratic leaders during a wave of uprisings known as the Arab Spring. An elite team of 50 Marines that was sent to San'a to bolster security at the U.S. Embassy after a Sept.
SPORTS
September 25, 1992 | by Frank Bertucci, Special to the Daily News
"Hooligan" is defined by "Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary" as "ruffian, hoodlum. " In this country, it seems that a hooligan is thought to be anyone who attends soccer games in Europe. And, of course, we're about to be invaded by all of them in 1994 during the World Cup. Look at the Daily News headline on Tuesday: "Hooligan alert. " Edgar Best was introduced Monday as senior vice president for security for the 1994 World Cup, ostensibly the man to save us all from them.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Mark Bowden, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than $20 million of SEPTA's railroad switching and signal equipment is housed in ramshackle sheds unprotected by fencing or any other security barriers, according to an internal survey of property by transit authority police. A report written by SEPTA police Sgt. Steven Harold noted 50 locations throughout the Regional Rail system where equipment, ranging in value from $50,000 to more than $1 million, was ill-housed and underprotected. "It certainly doesn't make any sense for there not to be better security around these locations," said SEPTA police Chief Howard F. Patton Jr. "I have spoken to the acting general manager about it. Taking some steps to secure them will cost only about $300,000, which, given the value of the equipment out there is certainly a worthwhile investment.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Abdul Sattar, Associated Press
QUETTA, Pakistan - About 3,500 Pakistani Shiites protested in southwestern Pakistan for a second day on Saturday, blocking a main road with dozens of coffins of relatives killed in explosions to demand better security from the government. Police in the city of Quetta said the protest had ended, but prominent Shiite leader Ibrahim Hazara said it would continue until the city was handed over to the army and the provincial government was dismissed. About 50 coffins blocked the road near a place where Shiites worship in Quetta, the capital of southwestern Baluchistan province.
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NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Center City residents living at the epicenter of the papal events in September will have some help navigating security restrictions, Mayor Nutter said Thursday. Nutter and Donna Crilley Farrell, executive director of the World Meeting of Families, outlined resources available to residents, including making the city's 311 hotline available 24 hours a day just ahead of the visit. Also, a "papal playbook" will be released, specifically created for residents with questions about transportation, emergency contacts and information on events during the week.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Papal visit security measures are causing a giant case of heartburn among restaurateurs, cafe owners, and even operators of Reading Terminal Market, the very businesses that are among Philadelphia's most celebrated amenities and tourist draws. With inbound vehicles barred and public transit sharply curtailed for the better part of three days when Pope Francis visits next month, the eateries that normally thrive on big crowds are struggling to figure out how to stay open and have enough food and workers to function.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series The nation's future cyber sleuths are in training in a third-floor classroom in Drexel University's Bossone Hall. Even as security breaches make headlines - the alleged Chinese hack attack on the U.S. government's federal personnel records in June, the compromise of 1.1 million Neiman Marcus credit cards in January - Kapil Dandekar's wireless network security class practices hacking into and defending make-believe information networks and communication systems.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The massive security efforts planned for next month's papal visit to Philadelphia are unnecessarily burdensome and might not be effective, according to some security and counterterrorism experts. The closure of major highways and bridges for more than two days, a three-square-mile traffic-free zone in Center City, restricted transit access, and the closing of offices and businesses "is a disproportional reaction," said Scott White, a former security agent for the Canadian government and now a professor of homeland security and security management at Drexel University.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie's most fiery moment of Thursday's GOP presidential debate came during an exchange with Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, as Christie gave a strident defense of government intelligence gathering, and Paul accused him of being willing to weaken Americans' privacy rights. But Christie stayed out of the fray with real estate mogul Donald Trump during the debate - the first such matchup between the top Republican candidates, 10 of whom earned spots on the stage during prime time in Cleveland based on an average of national polls used by Fox News.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Marcus Brown, whose nomination to lead the Pennsylvania State Police was quashed earlier this year, has been tapped again by Gov. Wolf for a public safety post. Wolf on Thursday appointed Brown director of the Governor's Office of Homeland Security, where he will lead the state's response to terrorism and infrastructure threats. "The commonwealth must take every step necessary to protect its citizens from terrorist threats, and I am confident that Col. Brown's leadership and experience will be an asset to the commonwealth in this role," Wolf said in a statement.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The security restrictions being placed on Philadelphia for the papal visit invite comparison to the fenced-in "closed cities" of World War II. Or Manhattan after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Or American cities patrolled by National Guard troops during riots in the 1960s. Rarely has a peacetime event drawn such Draconian security measures across such a broad section of a U.S. city. Overkill is the word being used by some law enforcement and transportation officials for the sweeping shutdown of highways and bridges, and the creation of a Beirut-style "green zone" where most vehicle traffic will be forbidden.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WITH THE city's official announcement yesterday about bridge closures, traffic boxes and other security measures for Pope Francis' arrival next month, the Twittersphere was dripping with sarcasm. During his news conference, Mayor Nutter proclaimed: "We will be ready. " To which one person on Twitter replied: "For the pope or Godzilla?" All jokes aside, the extensive buildup raises the question: Is a city supposedly known for its hospitality - brotherly love and all that - gearing up to welcome people in, or to keep people out?
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry K. Bootle went into the Air Force in July 1958 with a South Carolina high school education. But by the time he retired as a chief master sergeant for security in September 1986, he had earned a bachelor's degree in education at what is now Texas State University in 1977. And he had followed that with a master's in human relations from what is now Webster University in St. Louis in 1978. Mr. Bootle took the Air Force opportunities to earn his degrees because he figured that "if he had more training, he could progress," his wife, Christina, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The pope was immensely popular, and his visit to the redbrick city was seen as a history-making event. People streamed in - by bus, train, and foot - to hear him speak in a sprawling public park, and they turned the city's old, narrow streets into tributaries of flowing humanity. Yet the communal joy was tempered by fresh news of a brazen bombing. Fears of a terrorist attack left government officials on edge. That was Dublin in 1979 and I was a young (very young!) reporter covering the visit of Pope John Paul II for a monthly Irish "news" magazine called Magill . Along with 5,000 or so members of the international press corps, I trailed the pope during the 51 hours he spent in Ireland, following the frenzied pack as it moved from Dublin to the remote village of Knock to the free drinks at the bar in the Irish parliament.
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