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NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - The Egyptian military on Monday assumed joint responsibility with the police for security and protecting state institutions until the results of a Dec. 15 constitutional referendum are announced. The army took up the task in line with a decree issued Sunday by President Mohammed Morsi. The Islamist leader on Monday also suspended a series of tax hikes announced the previous day on alcohol, cigarettes, and other items. The presidential edict orders the military and police to jointly maintain security in the run-up to Saturday's vote on the disputed charter, which was hurriedly approved last month by a panel dominated by the president's Islamist allies despite a boycott of the committee's liberal, secular, and Christian members.
NEWS
May 22, 1986
It is ironic that in his May 14 Letter to the Editor Noah Barsky defends President Reagan's "Star Wars" program saying that the longer it is delayed, the longer it will be before we Americans have a "sense of security" from nuclear attack. That's all anyone can hope to have from this program: A sense of security. Clearly we will not have genuine security, because not even the President's most ardent advocates are willing to commit to the idea that we would be 100 percent secure from attack with this system.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
Greg Kern, the Philadelphia Housing Authority's acting executive director, thinks he has signed an all-star. Dorothy Cousins, the first woman inspector of the city Police Department and the first female chief of county detectives, is the authority's first female security director. Cousins, who started working at the authority this week at an annual salary of $49,500, will run a stronger security department. Unlike her predecessor, Eugene O'Neill, who will stay on as director of investigations, Cousins will report directly to the authority's executive director.
SPORTS
September 15, 2001 | By Jim Salisbury and Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
When the Phillies resume play Monday with the first of four games against the Atlanta Braves, fans no longer will be allowed to bring coolers, backpacks or large bags into Veterans Stadium under a new policy announced yesterday by Major League Baseball. "Fans should expect a close inspection upon entry," Michael R. Stiles, Phillies vice president for operations and administration, said yesterday. "We're going to have a heightened security effort, and that may account for a delay in fans being admitted," he said.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Ahmed Al Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - A masked gunman assassinated a Yemeni security official who worked for the U.S. Embassy in a drive-by shooting Thursday in the capital, officials said, adding that the assault bore the hallmarks of al-Qaeda's Yemen branch. The attack comes amid a sharp deterioration of security in Yemen and several other Muslim countries since the collapse of police states controlled by autocratic leaders during a wave of uprisings known as the Arab Spring. An elite team of 50 Marines that was sent to San'a to bolster security at the U.S. Embassy after a Sept.
SPORTS
September 25, 1992 | by Frank Bertucci, Special to the Daily News
"Hooligan" is defined by "Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary" as "ruffian, hoodlum. " In this country, it seems that a hooligan is thought to be anyone who attends soccer games in Europe. And, of course, we're about to be invaded by all of them in 1994 during the World Cup. Look at the Daily News headline on Tuesday: "Hooligan alert. " Edgar Best was introduced Monday as senior vice president for security for the 1994 World Cup, ostensibly the man to save us all from them.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Mark Bowden, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than $20 million of SEPTA's railroad switching and signal equipment is housed in ramshackle sheds unprotected by fencing or any other security barriers, according to an internal survey of property by transit authority police. A report written by SEPTA police Sgt. Steven Harold noted 50 locations throughout the Regional Rail system where equipment, ranging in value from $50,000 to more than $1 million, was ill-housed and underprotected. "It certainly doesn't make any sense for there not to be better security around these locations," said SEPTA police Chief Howard F. Patton Jr. "I have spoken to the acting general manager about it. Taking some steps to secure them will cost only about $300,000, which, given the value of the equipment out there is certainly a worthwhile investment.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Abdul Sattar, Associated Press
QUETTA, Pakistan - About 3,500 Pakistani Shiites protested in southwestern Pakistan for a second day on Saturday, blocking a main road with dozens of coffins of relatives killed in explosions to demand better security from the government. Police in the city of Quetta said the protest had ended, but prominent Shiite leader Ibrahim Hazara said it would continue until the city was handed over to the army and the provincial government was dismissed. About 50 coffins blocked the road near a place where Shiites worship in Quetta, the capital of southwestern Baluchistan province.
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NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THE MULTITIERED granite steps from the concourse of the Municipal Services Building provide more than just an egress from SEPTA's underground rail line to the Center City streets above. The steps, or rather the cavernous space beneath them, offer refuge from the rain for Philadelphia's homeless. "This is the only dry place we can go in Center City," George Creamer said yesterday after yet another soaker left puddles near his cardboard sleeping mat. "Trust me, I'd rather sleep out underneath the stars, but on nights like tonight, when it's going to rain, there is going to be 20 people down here.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2015 | Inquirer Staff Writer
By Harold Brubaker Picwell, a Philadelphia start-up with a system that analyzes 900,000 variables to help consumers evaluate health insurance plans, said it completed its first significant round of venture capital financing, raising more than than $4 million. The lead investor was MassMutual Ventures, the corporate venture capital arm of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., of Springfield, Mass. Picwell, founded in late 2013, can help employees choosing between different plans offered by their employer save the equivalent of one paycheck per year, Picwell CEO Jay Silverstein, said in an interview last month.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama promised Monday that aging Americans' financial security will not be eroded as the nation grows older, but added, "We're going to have to work for it. " Speaking at the White House Conference on Aging, the president noted that 10,000 Americans a day are turning 65, and that this presents an enormous burden on individuals and society to make sure seniors have enough money, health care, and people to look after them. About 900 people in Philadelphia for a meeting of the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging watched Obama's remarks via internet at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown hotel.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter confirmed Thursday that parts of Philadelphia will be fenced in for security during the visit by Pope Francis in September, but dismissed speculation that the whole of Center City will be behind chain links. "Whoever is saying that somehow all of Center City is going to be shut down has no idea what they're talking about," Nutter said at a news briefing at City Hall following a trip to Mexico. "There's never been any discussion with me where the idea of all of Center City being enclosed, encapsulated, shut down, has ever been discussed," he said.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials and organizers said Monday that they are discussing the possible construction of a fence as high as 8 feet around parts of Center City as security for Pope Francis' visit in September, but that talks are still preliminary. A source involved in the event planning said portions of Center City would be surrounded by fencing, but that the footprint of the security perimeter is being worked out and is largely contingent on the pope's Philadelphia itinerary, which could change in the next three months.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
AlliedBarton Security Services, the Conshohocken-based security giant, will be sold to Wendel, a Paris-based private-equity firm, in a $1.67 billion cash and debt deal. AlliedBarton, which began its local history as SpectaGuard, founded by former Flyers president Jay Snider, employs 6,000 locally and 55,000 nationally. It counts 200 of the Fortune 500 as clients, along with 3,000 other landlords and tenants. Wendel owns 11.7 percent of the Malvern-based building-materials maker Saint-Gobain, which includes Certainteed, a more well-known local materials company.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROME - Philadelphia's security preparations for Pope Francis' 48-hour visit have been going on for more than a year. For Ignazio Marino, mayor of Rome, papal security is an everyday issue. "It's pretty tough because the pope is a terrific person, he attracts millions of people, so traffic and security is a huge, huge issue - particularly in these days and time with possibility of terroristic attacks, we are always concerned," Marino said Thursday outside his office in Rome. The final day of the Philadelphia delegation's trip to Rome focused largely on getting input from Roman and Vatican City authorities on security and infrastructure for large-scale events featuring the pope.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Along with the pomp and pride that comes with hosting the 2016 Democratic National Convention, there's an underside for Philadelphia: begging Congress for money. Since 9/11, federal lawmakers have set aside $100 million every four years to help cover security costs for the cities hosting the national party conventions, but only after overcoming resistance from those who balk at laying out taxpayer money for lavish political rallies. The wrangling in those fights provides a window into how pet causes creep onto the federal tab - often as footnotes in larger and more pressing bills.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie hasn't negotiated with other countries or shaped foreign policy. But he does claim one resumé detail to distinguish himself on national security ahead of a likely 2016 presidential run: the Patriot Act. Even as Congress scales back the law, Christie has been arguing forcefully for the tools given to law enforcement and intelligence agencies after 9/11 as crucial to prosecuting terrorists. Yet the importance of the Patriot Act in Christie's tenure as a prosecutor is less clear than he asserts.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's employer payrolls expanded by 280,000 jobs in May, the U.S. Department of Labor reported Friday, with increased hiring across industry sectors. The unemployment rate rose slightly, to 5.5 percent from 5.4 percent in April, but was down from 6.3 percent last May. The strong employment gain last month has Wall Street expecting the Federal Reserve to move by October to increase interest rates, to keep the economy from overheating. Cranes and scaffolding in Center City and West Philadelphia tell the jobs story here, where, like elsewhere around the country, construction employment is particularly robust.
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