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Security Blanket

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NEWS
February 15, 2000
Childhood is a time of secret anxieties, of hurts that sting all out of proportion, of casual words that lodge in memory and refuse to budge for life. Get over it, parents will sometimes urge their emotional children. Charles Schulz never got over it. Thank goodness. The creator of Peanuts, who died at age 77 last weekend, never lost his vivid sense of childhood as a time when hope and dread, pleasure and anxiety, friendship and cruelty clash unforgettably. For 50 years, his strip - the loyal work of his hands and his hands alone - surveyed the emotional terrain of childhood with wit, candor and a theological depth.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | Daily News wire services
MOGADISHU GIS TO STAY ON AS 'SECURITY BLANKET' America's top general told a flotilla of sailors and Marines yesterday they must remain off Somalia's shores for at least another six weeks as a "security blanket" for U.S. citizens and diplomats. Gen. John Shalikashvili, during a whirlwind trip to gauge the final days of the U.S. military withdrawal, told sailors on board the helicopter assault ship USS Peleliu that "no one knows" what's going to happen once American forces leave Somalia and hand over the peacekeeping job to U.N. troops.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1993 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a program of bedtime stories that's strictly for big kids. It's billed Tellebration 93!, an evening of personal stories and folktales for adults told by members of Patchwork: a Storytelling Guild, professional tale- tellers from the Philadelphia area. It's the guild's fourth such event, which raises money for the National Association for the Perpetuation and Preservation of Storytelling (NAPPS), and it happens Nov. 20 at Friends Central School, 1101 City Ave. in Wynnewood.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By Michael Bamberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Derek Hamilton began his varsity high school football career in a big way Saturday. A sophomore fullback playing in his first game for the Haverford School, Hamilton ran for 145 yards on two carries, setting up two Ford touchdowns. Hamilton's fleet running enabled the Fords to win their season opener, as they defeated Roman Catholic, 14-6, at home. "I didn't think I'd get 100 yards," said Hamilton, who admitted to being nervous. 'So to come up with 145 - that was a really big thrill.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
It's just a stained, raggedy, weatherbeaten white sweatshirt. Two discolored stripes around the right sleeve. A well frayed collar. Splotches of paint down the front. It doesn't matter. It's still the first one off the hook just about every weekend. Like a baby's security blanket, it's always there. Like that blanket, the shirt is also very special. What makes it special is the four faded blue letters across the front. WEST, it reads. One time, when the letters were bright and new, a man, wearing his West shirt, was taking a sunset walk on a South Jersey beach.
SPORTS
July 30, 2007 | By LES BOWEN bowenl@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
It's Andy Reid's team, but it's Donovan McNabb's leg. That was one obvious conclusion over the weekend, as McNabb worked out with a group of rookies and select vets, and both he and his coach addressed reporters. McNabb looked just fine dropping back, planting and throwing Saturday and yesterday, although the Eagles' quarterback was excused from yesterday's morning session after it was moved indoors to Rauch Fieldhouse's hard surface by a prolonged thunderstorm. But just as in last month's minicamp, Reid and McNabb seemed to emphasize different things when they discussed McNabb's recovery from right ACL surgery.
NEWS
November 19, 2006 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I hate flying. I hate flying so much I drove from my job in Nebraska to my mother's home in Baltimore. I hate flying so much that I took a 27-hour bus ride from London to Prague. And yet, I love to travel. Ironic, no? And not in a not-really-ironic, Alanis Morissette way. There are many like me. A landmark 1980 study by Boeing found that one of every three Americans was either anxious or afraid to fly. And that was before skyscrapers became targets. Millions of folks, popping drugs, tossing back shots, gripping the armrests in knuckle-popping agony.
SPORTS
September 24, 2003 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last week, as Philadelphia mourned two Eagles losses, A.J. Feeley had another burden to carry. With a board of governors' vote, his girlfriend, Heather Mitts, suddenly was unemployed. Just like that, the Women's United Soccer Association was gone from this town, this country, and, for now, Mitts' life, undone by unmet financial goals. "It's unfortunate because I think we need as many professional leagues for females that we can possibly have," Feeley, the Eagles' third-string quarterback, said on Monday.
SPORTS
September 21, 2001 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bok quarterback Kareem Jeffreys always had his security blanket last season. Whenever he got into trouble - or even when he had plenty of time to work - he could always throw the ball downfield and count on Ramon Mills, arguably the most dangerous offensive weapon in the Public League, to leap above a defensive back and catch it. Mills then typically turned the play into a big gain. But Mills, a senior receiver last year, is gone. Not that his absence slowed Bok's offense yesterday.
SPORTS
October 22, 1992 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The 76ers, who came west without Andrew Lang, Johny Dawkins and Jeff Ruland, also didn't have Hersey Hawkins, Armon Gilliam or Charles Shackleford last night. They didn't have much else, either, in a 119-100 preseason loss to the Utah Jazz. They started out shooting 6-for-21 in the first quarter, eventually found some ways to score, but never unraveled the mystery of their dreadful defense. "We just let (opponents) do what they want," said Hawkins, who sat out with a pulled quadriceps muscle in his right leg. "We don't hit people, we let guys roam around, score at will.
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SPORTS
August 4, 2010 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
CHICAGO - Evan Royster isn't the fastest running back ever to play for the Penn State Nittany Lions. He isn't the most powerful, either, nor the most elusive in the open field. His "wow" factor on a scale of 1-to-10 probably is somewhere around 6, maybe a 7 on a good day. But the durable, dependable 6-1, 224-pound senior from Fairfax, Va., is set to enter the 2010 season well within range of one of the school's longest-standing records - the 3,398 career rushing yards set by two-time All-America and 2009 College Football Hall of Fame inductee Curt Warner from 1979-82.
SPORTS
July 30, 2007 | By LES BOWEN bowenl@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
It's Andy Reid's team, but it's Donovan McNabb's leg. That was one obvious conclusion over the weekend, as McNabb worked out with a group of rookies and select vets, and both he and his coach addressed reporters. McNabb looked just fine dropping back, planting and throwing Saturday and yesterday, although the Eagles' quarterback was excused from yesterday's morning session after it was moved indoors to Rauch Fieldhouse's hard surface by a prolonged thunderstorm. But just as in last month's minicamp, Reid and McNabb seemed to emphasize different things when they discussed McNabb's recovery from right ACL surgery.
NEWS
November 19, 2006 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I hate flying. I hate flying so much I drove from my job in Nebraska to my mother's home in Baltimore. I hate flying so much that I took a 27-hour bus ride from London to Prague. And yet, I love to travel. Ironic, no? And not in a not-really-ironic, Alanis Morissette way. There are many like me. A landmark 1980 study by Boeing found that one of every three Americans was either anxious or afraid to fly. And that was before skyscrapers became targets. Millions of folks, popping drugs, tossing back shots, gripping the armrests in knuckle-popping agony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2003 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ALTHOUGH THE Nation of Islam is denying any official role in Michael Jackson's life, members of the group have reportedly begun handling security at Neverland Ranch and taking over some of Jackson's business affairs since the self-proclaimed King of Pop was accused of committing lewd acts on a child. Unfortunately, the Nation of Islam has not begun advising the one-gloved epaulet-attired singer how to dress. The group, which in the past has been accused of anti-Semitism and inflammatory, separatist rhetoric, issued a statement Monday: "The Nation of Islam, in response to several inquiries, has said today that it has no official business or professional relationship with Mr. Michael Jackson.
SPORTS
September 24, 2003 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last week, as Philadelphia mourned two Eagles losses, A.J. Feeley had another burden to carry. With a board of governors' vote, his girlfriend, Heather Mitts, suddenly was unemployed. Just like that, the Women's United Soccer Association was gone from this town, this country, and, for now, Mitts' life, undone by unmet financial goals. "It's unfortunate because I think we need as many professional leagues for females that we can possibly have," Feeley, the Eagles' third-string quarterback, said on Monday.
NEWS
October 16, 2002
The federal courts have declared that immigration hearings for those swept up in post-Sept. 11 investigations should be open . . . or closed. "Democracies die behind closed doors" stated a Cincinnati federal judge, ruling several months ago that the blanket closure of hundreds of hearings was unconstitutional. But last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia ruled the other way: Hearings can be held in secret. How so? Chief Judge Edward R. Becker wrote it's a whole new game since terrorists targeted the United States.
SPORTS
September 21, 2001 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bok quarterback Kareem Jeffreys always had his security blanket last season. Whenever he got into trouble - or even when he had plenty of time to work - he could always throw the ball downfield and count on Ramon Mills, arguably the most dangerous offensive weapon in the Public League, to leap above a defensive back and catch it. Mills then typically turned the play into a big gain. But Mills, a senior receiver last year, is gone. Not that his absence slowed Bok's offense yesterday.
NEWS
December 18, 2000 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the Monday after another big win, and the media are assembling at Veterans Stadium for the weekly Eagles press briefing from coach Andy Reid. Clusters of reporters compare notes and stats from the game between gobbles of fried shrimp and hot beef provided by Chickie and Pete's. Finally at 12:30, the burly coach enters and heads straight to the podium to run down the injuries and to field questions. Accompanying him through the door in a leather "NFL" jacket is his constant sideline companion, Anthony "Butch" Buchanico.
NEWS
May 9, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The peace of mind that comes with having a security blanket is a feeling almost every child can relate to, thanks in part to Project Linus. Started in Colorado in 1995, Project Linus has donated handmade blankets to children in need, with a focus on the seriously ill or traumatized. It borrowed the name from the blanket-toting tot in the Peanuts comic strip. The international nonprofit organization's local volunteer chapters, such as the one in Chester Springs, see to it that area children are blanketed with love.
NEWS
February 15, 2000
Childhood is a time of secret anxieties, of hurts that sting all out of proportion, of casual words that lodge in memory and refuse to budge for life. Get over it, parents will sometimes urge their emotional children. Charles Schulz never got over it. Thank goodness. The creator of Peanuts, who died at age 77 last weekend, never lost his vivid sense of childhood as a time when hope and dread, pleasure and anxiety, friendship and cruelty clash unforgettably. For 50 years, his strip - the loyal work of his hands and his hands alone - surveyed the emotional terrain of childhood with wit, candor and a theological depth.
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