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Security Clearance

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NEWS
September 7, 1987 | By Frank Greve, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Getting a U.S. government security clearance can be easier than getting an American Express credit card. Would-be 7-Eleven clerks sometimes face tougher background checks than enlistees on the Navy's nuclear submarines. Yet background investigations, which 95 percent of military personnel and 99 percent of civilians ultimately pass, take an average of three months to complete and cost more than $165 million a year, according to the General Accounting Office. Those delays cost taxpayers as much as $920 million a year in lost productivity, the office says.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
With computer degrees from high-ranking universities and experience in artificial intelligence, James M. Wood was looking forward to a career in the pioneering field when he accepted a job at General Electric Co. last fall. Some of the work he was hired to do was so sensitive that he had to apply for a government security clearance. But his application faced nothing but problems after the security investigation turned up an allegation that he was homosexual, Wood, 26, says in a federal lawsuit.
NEWS
March 14, 2006
THE CIA HAS given Scooter Libby a "Get out of jail" card. The CIA claims that copying 400 daily briefing papers for the president would take up to nine months. We know that the copying itself would not take this long, even if the briefing papers ran to 20 pages apiece. So, it must be that the effort of blacking out the items that the judge is not authorized to review that causes the problem. Perhaps this problem could be avoided by obtaining a security clearance for the judge. Surely, this shouldn't be a problem for a federal judge who has passed muster with our illustrious and quick-witted GOP Congress.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Defense Department, General Electric Co. and GE computer specialist James M. Wood have agreed to settle a suit Wood filed in July charging that he was denied due process in seeking a security clearance because of an allegation that he was a homosexual. The parties filed a stipulation of the settlement yesterday in U.S. District Court, and Wood released a brief statement. GE and the Defense Department had no comment. GE "has agreed to treat Wood the same as any other employee and not to engage in any retaliation because of his filing suit against GE," Wood, 26, of Center City, said in his statement.
NEWS
October 2, 1989 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
General Electric Co. has agreed to seek a security clearance for a computer specialist who sued the company for withdrawing his application after he was alleged to have been leading "a homosexual lifestyle," according to the employee's attorney. However, the U.S. District Court suit stands, said attorney Cletus Lyman, because the level of clearance sought for James M. Wood will be different from the one sought in the original application. Lyman said it was unclear whether a different clearance would be satisfactory to Wood, 26, an information systems engineer specializing in artificial intelligence, which involves the development of computers that can simulate the complexities of human intelligence.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Defense attorneys for Rabbi Fred J. Neulander want to know more about Len Jenoff's role as an FBI informant. But the FBI is balking. In documents filed yesterday in Camden County Superior Court, a federal prosecutor asked Judge Linda G. Baxter to deny a request for production of a more complete file on Jenoff. Jenoff, a former private investigator, is a key witness against Rabbi Neulander, who is charged with capital murder, felony murder and conspiracy in the November 1994 slaying of his wife, Carol, in their Cherry Hill home.
NEWS
October 19, 2005
"Blog" is short for "Web log," a diary on the Internet. Blogs can be endless and self-indulgent, or thoughtful and challenging. "Blog Cabin" offers a selection from recent high-profile blogs. Sic Semper Tyrannis 2005 http://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/ I had many levels of security clearance during my long government life. . . . I understood that with that access came an obligation to the state to protect the secrets of the American government. This obligation was entered into freely as a member of "the team.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | By Tim Weiner, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Theodore Postol, a prominent physicist with a top-secret security clearance, had an unpleasant and slightly surreal visit from a Pentagon investigator this week. The visit concerned a paper Postol published in International Security, an academic quarterly, in January. The paper concluded that, contrary to popular opinion, Patriot missiles performed poorly in the Persian Gulf war, frequently failing to hit Iraqi Scud missiles and sometimes slamming into populated areas. He called the Patriot's performance "an almost total failure.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Martin Corp., the nation's largest defense contractor, has bought a Bucks County software and services provider for $462 million. Sytex Group Inc., based in Doylestown, provides information technology and technical support to the U.S. Department of Defense and other federal agencies. The purchase price for the privately held Sytex excludes $13 million in net cash acquired. Sytex's three operating divisions specialize in technology engineering and systems integration, logistics, and technology for counterintelligence, counterterrorism and special operations.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Republican Sen. John McCain on Wednesday strongly defended a longtime aide to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton against unsubstantiated allegations that her family has ties to Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, repudiating charges leveled by another Republican, Rep. Michele Bachmann. In a speech on the Senate floor, McCain praised the work and patriotism of Huma Abedin, a State Department employee who has been a constant presence at Clinton's side. Without mentioning Bachmann by name, McCain assailed the attacks on Abedin, a Muslim, as an example of ignorance and fear that defames the spirit of the nation.
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NEWS
June 13, 2013
Conservative commentator Glenn Beck calls Edward Snowden a "hero," while Republican House Speaker John Boehner calls the domestic-espionage whistle-blower a "traitor. " Who's right? Maybe both of them. Snowden is like a stick of Doublemint, which in old TV commercials was described as "two gums in one. " It's hard to label him because of the way he chose to make an important point about the constitutionally questionable methods being used to guard America against terrorist attacks.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2013 | By Jonathan Fahey and Adam Goldman, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The U.S. government monitors threats to national security with the help of nearly 500,000 people like Edward Snowden - employees of private firms who have access to the government's most sensitive secrets. When Snowden, an employee of one of those firms, Booz Allen Hamilton, revealed details of two National Security Agency surveillance programs, he spotlighted the risks of making so many employees of private contractors a key part of the U.S. intelligence apparatus. James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, called Snowden's leak "gut wrenching.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Republican Sen. John McCain on Wednesday strongly defended a longtime aide to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton against unsubstantiated allegations that her family has ties to Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, repudiating charges leveled by another Republican, Rep. Michele Bachmann. In a speech on the Senate floor, McCain praised the work and patriotism of Huma Abedin, a State Department employee who has been a constant presence at Clinton's side. Without mentioning Bachmann by name, McCain assailed the attacks on Abedin, a Muslim, as an example of ignorance and fear that defames the spirit of the nation.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Emily Mendell is head of communications for the National Venture Capital Association and the co-founder of www.mothersofbrothers.com
The e-mail arrived in the late afternoon of March 30. The subject line read: INVITATION. It looked like spam and I was about to delete it, but something caught my eye in the preview window. A seal of some sort. The White House. Like any registered voter, I receive e-mails all the time from Barack, Michelle, Joe, and Jill. This was different. I wasn't being asked to donate or host a gathering in my home. I was invited to their home, for a signing of the JOBS Act. I reacted in a manner consistent with the maturity and grace I have cultivated in my 43 years of life.
NEWS
November 10, 2009 | By Michael Fumento
With unemployment up yet again, it must be reassuring to Americans that job-seeking veterans are being helped so much by the government, and by all those Web-based organizations with such names as VetJobs.com, MilitaryHire.com, RecruitMilitary.com, HireVeterans.com, and Military Job Zone. Except that they're not. Remember the expression "Don't forget; hire the vet"? We've forgotten. In fact, most of our job-seeking heroes get little or no help from the public or private sector.
NEWS
March 24, 2006 | DEBBIE WOODELL
THE BUSH administration is at it again - continuing its war on "gay terror. " Already unwilling to undo "don't ask, don't tell," it now apparently wants to keep gays and lesbians away from top-secret info. According to news reports, the administration, while not flat-out denying security clearances "solely on the basis of the sexual orientation of the individual," removed policy language that sexual orientation "may not be used as a basis for or a disqualifying factor" in determining eligibility for clearance.
NEWS
March 14, 2006
THE CIA HAS given Scooter Libby a "Get out of jail" card. The CIA claims that copying 400 daily briefing papers for the president would take up to nine months. We know that the copying itself would not take this long, even if the briefing papers ran to 20 pages apiece. So, it must be that the effort of blacking out the items that the judge is not authorized to review that causes the problem. Perhaps this problem could be avoided by obtaining a security clearance for the judge. Surely, this shouldn't be a problem for a federal judge who has passed muster with our illustrious and quick-witted GOP Congress.
NEWS
October 19, 2005
"Blog" is short for "Web log," a diary on the Internet. Blogs can be endless and self-indulgent, or thoughtful and challenging. "Blog Cabin" offers a selection from recent high-profile blogs. Sic Semper Tyrannis 2005 http://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/ I had many levels of security clearance during my long government life. . . . I understood that with that access came an obligation to the state to protect the secrets of the American government. This obligation was entered into freely as a member of "the team.
NEWS
June 20, 2005 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When University of Pennsylvania student Jessica Smyth landed a dream summer job at the White House, it seemed too good to be true. As it turned out, it was. In the end, her dream might translate into an interesting tale for the political-science major to share with her classmates in the fall: "How I Spent (One Day of) My Summer Vacation. " Smyth comes by her political jones through geography: She grew up in the District of Columbia "always loving politics," she said. Smyth is also a political activist.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Martin Corp., the nation's largest defense contractor, has bought a Bucks County software and services provider for $462 million. Sytex Group Inc., based in Doylestown, provides information technology and technical support to the U.S. Department of Defense and other federal agencies. The purchase price for the privately held Sytex excludes $13 million in net cash acquired. Sytex's three operating divisions specialize in technology engineering and systems integration, logistics, and technology for counterintelligence, counterterrorism and special operations.
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