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NEWS
March 30, 2012
Talks have broken off between SEPTA and its striking transit police force. A SEPTA spokeswoman said the two sides met for several hours Thursday, but no agreement was reached and no further talks had been scheduled. A spokesman for the Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents the officers, could not be reached for comment. About 200 transit officers, who have been working without a contract for a year, have been on strike since March 21. In their absence, city police, transit police supervisors, and private security companies are patrolling the system's subways, trains, buses, and trolleys.
NEWS
April 3, 2004 | By Seth Borenstein and Scott Dodd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
With the U.S. military stretched thin in Iraq and pursuing Osama bin Laden on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, the job of keeping the peace in Iraq and Afghanistan and guarding the pipelines is being taken over by hired guns. In the chaotic world of nation-building, thousands of former special operations soldiers are working for an untold number of private security companies, making far more than Uncle Sam paid them. But there are big risks with the big paychecks. Four private security guards from Blackwater Security Consulting of North Carolina were killed Wednesday in Fallujah, Iraq.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN hinkelm@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The federal government is trying to put troubled Argenbright Security Inc. out of the security business at U.S. airports. The Federal Aviation Administration is seeking bids from other security companies to take over Argenbright's airline security operations. Atlanta-based Argenbright, a unit of the British security conglomerate Securicor, has 40 percent of the market. Argenbright used to provide baggage screening and checkpoint security at Philadelphia International Airport, but no longer does, said airport spokesman Mark Pesce last night.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Heidi Vogt, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - NATO is allotting extra resources to set up an Afghan force to take over from private security firms after a report showed the Afghans are unlikely to be ready for the planned disbanding of private security companies in March, officials said Wednesday. Afghan President Hamid Karzai ordered last year that security companies be disbanded because they were flouting Afghan laws and creating the equivalent of paramilitary forces. But the process of shifting the guarding of convoys, development projects, and the outside perimeters of NATO bases over to Afghan forces has been slow.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2001 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The federal government will take control of more than 400 contracts that govern security at the nation's airports on Feb. 17. No longer will the airlines, which now contract directly with private security companies, be responsible for the low-wage screeners who perform baggage searches and pat-downs of passengers, as well as searches with handheld metal detectors. The change in who oversees the security contracts is mandated by the new aviation security law, a precursor to the complete control that the Department of Transportation will exercise next year when it hires 28,000 screeners.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Dion Nissenbaum and Hashim Shukoor, McClatchy Newspapers
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghan President Hamid Karzai's office abruptly announced plans Monday to close all private security companies in the country by year's end, a decision that could create more risk for the U.S.-led military along crucial supply routes into Afghanistan. In an announcement that appeared to catch NATO officials by surprise, Karzai vowed to shutter the polarizing, lucrative network of private security firms. "The government of Afghanistan has decided that the security companies have to go," Karzai spokesman Waheed Omar said.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2002 | By Thomas J. Walsh FOR THE INQUIRER
Allied Security is a direct, if somewhat reluctant, beneficiary of the nation's emphasis on security since last year's terrorist attacks. Allied has hired, trained and assigned hundreds of new security officers since last fall. Many of its business customers have had their contracts rewritten, usually to add guards, cameras and other technology. "We're getting involvement now from the CEO level," said Ron Rabena, an Allied senior vice president in charge of the Philadelphia region.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2002 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A video face-recognition system installed by a Bucks County company for crowd surveillance at Olympic hockey games was nixed at the last minute by Olympics organizers. The company, Graphco Technologies Inc., or G-Tec, of Newtown, which participated in a controversial similar installation at the 2001 Super Bowl, said it had hoped to make this month's Olympics in Salt Lake City a showcase for its system, called FaceTrac. But that will not happen. The local police chief who requisitioned the system last year said he was told on Feb. 7 that its use could violate sponsorship contracts between the Salt Lake Organizing Committee and other security companies at the games.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 2,500 Philadelphia security guards, working at most of the city's office buildings and major institutions, have become unionized and ratified their first contract. The ratification, coming as union membership is declining and unionism is under attack, will be announced at City Hall on Wednesday. The contract brings wage increases and health benefits to guards at the Gallery, the University of Pennsylvania, the Convention Center, and Temple University. "It means a lot to me," said Pamela Legg, 44, of West Philadelphia, a security guard at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | By Mike McGraw, Fredric N. Tulsky and Eric Nalder INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As House and Senate conferees argue over how best to screen airline passengers and baggage, it pays to look back a few years. In 1996, Congress directed the Federal Aviation Administration to create minimum standards to train and test workers who screen passengers and bags at airports. Five years later, the agency is still working on those rules. Twice since 1990, White House panels urged more efforts to keep explosives off planes. President Bill Clinton asked for "an action plan.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 2,500 Philadelphia security guards, working at most of the city's office buildings and major institutions, have become unionized and ratified their first contract. The ratification, coming as union membership is declining and unionism is under attack, will be announced at City Hall on Wednesday. The contract brings wage increases and health benefits to guards at the Gallery, the University of Pennsylvania, the Convention Center, and Temple University. "It means a lot to me," said Pamela Legg, 44, of West Philadelphia, a security guard at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
Talks have broken off between SEPTA and its striking transit police force. A SEPTA spokeswoman said the two sides met for several hours Thursday, but no agreement was reached and no further talks had been scheduled. A spokesman for the Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents the officers, could not be reached for comment. About 200 transit officers, who have been working without a contract for a year, have been on strike since March 21. In their absence, city police, transit police supervisors, and private security companies are patrolling the system's subways, trains, buses, and trolleys.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Heidi Vogt, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - NATO is allotting extra resources to set up an Afghan force to take over from private security firms after a report showed the Afghans are unlikely to be ready for the planned disbanding of private security companies in March, officials said Wednesday. Afghan President Hamid Karzai ordered last year that security companies be disbanded because they were flouting Afghan laws and creating the equivalent of paramilitary forces. But the process of shifting the guarding of convoys, development projects, and the outside perimeters of NATO bases over to Afghan forces has been slow.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Dion Nissenbaum and Hashim Shukoor, McClatchy Newspapers
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghan President Hamid Karzai's office abruptly announced plans Monday to close all private security companies in the country by year's end, a decision that could create more risk for the U.S.-led military along crucial supply routes into Afghanistan. In an announcement that appeared to catch NATO officials by surprise, Karzai vowed to shutter the polarizing, lucrative network of private security firms. "The government of Afghanistan has decided that the security companies have to go," Karzai spokesman Waheed Omar said.
NEWS
April 3, 2004 | By Seth Borenstein and Scott Dodd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
With the U.S. military stretched thin in Iraq and pursuing Osama bin Laden on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, the job of keeping the peace in Iraq and Afghanistan and guarding the pipelines is being taken over by hired guns. In the chaotic world of nation-building, thousands of former special operations soldiers are working for an untold number of private security companies, making far more than Uncle Sam paid them. But there are big risks with the big paychecks. Four private security guards from Blackwater Security Consulting of North Carolina were killed Wednesday in Fallujah, Iraq.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2002 | By Thomas J. Walsh FOR THE INQUIRER
Allied Security is a direct, if somewhat reluctant, beneficiary of the nation's emphasis on security since last year's terrorist attacks. Allied has hired, trained and assigned hundreds of new security officers since last fall. Many of its business customers have had their contracts rewritten, usually to add guards, cameras and other technology. "We're getting involvement now from the CEO level," said Ron Rabena, an Allied senior vice president in charge of the Philadelphia region.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2002 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A video face-recognition system installed by a Bucks County company for crowd surveillance at Olympic hockey games was nixed at the last minute by Olympics organizers. The company, Graphco Technologies Inc., or G-Tec, of Newtown, which participated in a controversial similar installation at the 2001 Super Bowl, said it had hoped to make this month's Olympics in Salt Lake City a showcase for its system, called FaceTrac. But that will not happen. The local police chief who requisitioned the system last year said he was told on Feb. 7 that its use could violate sponsorship contracts between the Salt Lake Organizing Committee and other security companies at the games.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN hinkelm@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The federal government is trying to put troubled Argenbright Security Inc. out of the security business at U.S. airports. The Federal Aviation Administration is seeking bids from other security companies to take over Argenbright's airline security operations. Atlanta-based Argenbright, a unit of the British security conglomerate Securicor, has 40 percent of the market. Argenbright used to provide baggage screening and checkpoint security at Philadelphia International Airport, but no longer does, said airport spokesman Mark Pesce last night.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2001 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The federal government will take control of more than 400 contracts that govern security at the nation's airports on Feb. 17. No longer will the airlines, which now contract directly with private security companies, be responsible for the low-wage screeners who perform baggage searches and pat-downs of passengers, as well as searches with handheld metal detectors. The change in who oversees the security contracts is mandated by the new aviation security law, a precursor to the complete control that the Department of Transportation will exercise next year when it hires 28,000 screeners.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | By Mike McGraw, Fredric N. Tulsky and Eric Nalder INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As House and Senate conferees argue over how best to screen airline passengers and baggage, it pays to look back a few years. In 1996, Congress directed the Federal Aviation Administration to create minimum standards to train and test workers who screen passengers and bags at airports. Five years later, the agency is still working on those rules. Twice since 1990, White House panels urged more efforts to keep explosives off planes. President Bill Clinton asked for "an action plan.
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