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Security Deposit

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REAL_ESTATE
May 26, 1989 | By Robert J. Bruss, Special to The Inquirer
I am a novice landlord. When we bought our new home, we decided to keep our old house and rent it to tenants. They paid us a $1,000 security deposit. Do we owe tax on the money? Not yet. Only if the tenant forfeited the security deposit, possibly to pay for damage to the property, would it become income on which you must pay taxes. Of course, you then would have an offsetting repair cost. Until the security deposit is forfeited, the security deposit is not taxable. Your tax adviser can give you details.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By ROBYN SCHAUFFELE SELVIN, Daily News Sales Columnist
Is buying beautiful things for your home one of life's great joys? Then consider a foray over to The Print Club, a non-profit graphic arts organization that runs a small art gallery on tiny Latimer Street in Center City. There you'll find hundreds of prints of all kinds: etchings, silk screens, lithographs and more - all done by emerging artists. Subjects run the gamut from abstracts to still lifes to narratives (they tell a story) to landscapes. The best news: Now through Dec. 24, a 20 percent discount is available to all shoppers.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying he failed to return all of their security deposit, the owners of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com have sued Bart Blatstein, the developer who bought their former building at 400 N. Broad St. "It appears, and we allege, that he misappropriated the money," the company's attorney, Thomas A. Leonard, said. The company gave Blatstein $340,500 for a security deposit, with the proviso that he keep it in a separate account. The lawsuit said Blatstein mingled the deposit with his other funds.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Attorney General LeRoy S. Zimmerman has filed a suit against a Montgomery County medical alarm company saying that the company has failed to refund $5,400 in deposits to nine customers. In a suit filed in Philadelphia District Court June 22, the state said that Med-Alert, a medical emergency alarm system with offices in Jenkintown and North Wales, had not returned the $600 deposits. The attorney general also requested that the court ask Med-Alert to turn over information to ensure that other customers have had their deposits returned.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
A Folcroft tavern owner has asked the borough council to return $6,000 in security fees for video poker machines confiscated by the state police and has also sought a permit to install two new poker machines. Jerome Grossman, owner of the Red Lantern Tavern, 41 Oak Ave., was represented by attorney Andrew D'Amico at Tuesday night's meeting, a continuation of the March 13 session. D'Amico gave the council the following account: On March 15, 1986, three video poker machines in operation at the Red Lantern were confiscated by state police, who charged that they had been used for illegal gambling.
NEWS
June 1, 2005
RE THE THE Responsible Utility Consumer Protection Act: Philadelphia Gas Works now has the right to hold landlords responsible for their tenants' unpaid gas bills, and can also put a lien on the property. Sounds like our elected officials are trying to create disinvestment in the city of Philadelphia. PGW will turn on gas service for anyone who has a pulse and identification, even though they may be delinquent in past accounts. PGW will turn on service at a new address even without a security deposit.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a journalist, a new source is the most generous benefactor. For journalist John Chancellor, Ira Lipman, a 16-year-old at Little Rock Central High in 1957, was the source for his groundbreaking report from the desegregation front. Last night, Lipman, 54, a businessman, became a permanent benefactor when he announced the creation of the John Chancellor Award, an annual $25,000 prize to be given for excellence in journalism. Chancellor and Lipman were the guests of honor at a dinner hosted by the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Public Policy.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, Daily News Staff Writer
THE MADE IN AMERICA festival is officially paid for, and Mayor Nutter says taxpayers are off the hook. Nutter said concert promoter Live Nation has paid $505,124 to cover the city costs incurred by the Labor Day weekend event outside the Art Museum, featuring rap mogul Jay-Z. That includes a $200,000 security deposit and a payment made Wednesday of $305,124. Nutter did not break down exactly what the money covered. The contract for the event lists estimated costs for city services at $500,000, with the following split: police, $220,000; Fairmount Park, $120,000; emergency medical services, $90,000; sanitation, $60,000; licenses and inspections, $10,000; and health services, $1,000.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | by Nicole Weisensee Egan, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Yvonne Latty and Jim Smith contributed to this report
Not only were Roberto Rodriguez and Felix De la Mota alleged drug traffickers, they were apparently terrible neighbors. Rodriguez, 24, lived with his wife and their pit bull in a $300-a-month apartment on Germantown Avenue near Diamond Street in North Philadelphia. They moved in on Nov. 1 and paid three months rent upfront plus a security deposit, landlord Manuel Diaz, 48, said yesterday. "They paid their rent OK, but the last month their behavior was bad," he said. That's when other tenants reported seeing mysterious strangers coming and going at all hours.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsauken loan broker, which during the spring ran advertisements in a dozen newspapers around the country offering to secure business and personal loans from $2,000 to $2 million for people with bad credit, has refunded more than $5,000 to 14 of its customers, the Camden County Consumer Affairs Office said. Penn Financial Services Inc. is no longer in business, according to two of its owners, Frank Masso of Evesham and his son Anthony. The Massos said that Penn Financial and another loan brokering company they founded, Burlington Financial Consultants, were closed after only a few weeks because "it just didn't work out. " In part, Frank Masso said, the businesses were closed due to the "bad reputation of the (loan broker)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 1, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying he failed to return all of their security deposit, the owners of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com have sued Bart Blatstein, the developer who bought their former building at 400 N. Broad St. "It appears, and we allege, that he misappropriated the money," the company's attorney, Thomas A. Leonard, said. The company gave Blatstein $340,500 for a security deposit, with the proviso that he keep it in a separate account. The lawsuit said Blatstein mingled the deposit with his other funds.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, Daily News Staff Writer
THE MADE IN AMERICA festival is officially paid for, and Mayor Nutter says taxpayers are off the hook. Nutter said concert promoter Live Nation has paid $505,124 to cover the city costs incurred by the Labor Day weekend event outside the Art Museum, featuring rap mogul Jay-Z. That includes a $200,000 security deposit and a payment made Wednesday of $305,124. Nutter did not break down exactly what the money covered. The contract for the event lists estimated costs for city services at $500,000, with the following split: police, $220,000; Fairmount Park, $120,000; emergency medical services, $90,000; sanitation, $60,000; licenses and inspections, $10,000; and health services, $1,000.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
DEAR HARRY: My family has had an account with Peco since 1952. There never was a problem in paying their bills on time. My dad died in 2004, and my mom had no trouble getting everything changed to her name alone. She became seriously ill shortly afterward, and I became her caregiver. I paid all her bills with checks drawn on my account with my name clearly printed on them. She died about six months ago, and I got all her stuff transferred to my name, except for this Peco account.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2012 | By Gail MarksJarvis, Chicago Tribune
The hunt for extra-long sheets for the dormitory bed is over. You've packed your child off to college, equipped with all the gear needed for campus life. But there's still time to talk with your student, however remotely, about money - especially credit cards. Students typically are naive about high interest rates, penalties from missing payments, and the lousy credit scores that will hound them for years if they don't give such matters proper attention now. Many adults in money trouble today started burying themselves with credit-card debt in college.
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
To dwell in an apartment is to be free of snow shoveling but beholden to a company that raids your savings and invades your privacy. How else to explain an appalling new national trend requiring tenants to provide access to their bank accounts as a condition of moving in or renewing a lease? Under deceptively named "Direct Debit" policies, tenants' checking accounts become a corporation's ATM. God help folks who get paid erratically, since disappearing funds could trigger bounced checks or late fees when they pay other bills.
NEWS
November 6, 2010 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel Castro, a Philadelphia police inspector, lost $90,000 on a real estate investment and, not surprisingly, sought to recoup his money in a June lawsuit. But the suit, oddly, came after federal authorities allege he engaged in a plot, starting in April, to get his money back through the threat of street justice. Was the suit part of a two-pronged strategy, or a cover story devised by Castro to take his target to court while also allegedly hiring a street enforcer to collect?
NEWS
June 1, 2005
RE THE THE Responsible Utility Consumer Protection Act: Philadelphia Gas Works now has the right to hold landlords responsible for their tenants' unpaid gas bills, and can also put a lien on the property. Sounds like our elected officials are trying to create disinvestment in the city of Philadelphia. PGW will turn on gas service for anyone who has a pulse and identification, even though they may be delinquent in past accounts. PGW will turn on service at a new address even without a security deposit.
NEWS
January 13, 2004 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The judge won. The landlord lost. An eight-member jury took one hour Friday to decide that Leslie Fleisher, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge, did not owe rent to her former landlord and that Fleisher should pay only $100 for damage to an apartment she vacated in 2002. In turn, the jury ordered the landlord, Phyllis Meloff, to refund $2,750 in security deposit and escrowed rent to Fleisher. Meloff had sued Fleisher seeking more than $12,000 - $7,250 in rent and $5,400 for repairs to a Center City apartment Fleisher had occupied from 1999 to 2002.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a courtroom twist, a judge of Philadelphia Common Pleas Court went on trial yesterday - as a defendant. Judge Leslie Fleisher is being sued by a former landlord who alleges that the judge owes $7,250 in unpaid rent and $5,400 in damages to a Center City apartment where Fleisher lived from 1999 to 2002. Fleisher and the landlord, Phyllis Meloff, were unable to work out what was described in court as a highly contentious dispute stemming from Fleisher's complaints about a malfunctioning heater.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | by Nicole Weisensee Egan, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Yvonne Latty and Jim Smith contributed to this report
Not only were Roberto Rodriguez and Felix De la Mota alleged drug traffickers, they were apparently terrible neighbors. Rodriguez, 24, lived with his wife and their pit bull in a $300-a-month apartment on Germantown Avenue near Diamond Street in North Philadelphia. They moved in on Nov. 1 and paid three months rent upfront plus a security deposit, landlord Manuel Diaz, 48, said yesterday. "They paid their rent OK, but the last month their behavior was bad," he said. That's when other tenants reported seeing mysterious strangers coming and going at all hours.
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