CollectionsSecurity Risk
IN THE NEWS

Security Risk

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 13, 2011 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
Ride the Ducks has its work cut out for it in Philadelphia. The duck-boat company is facing a number of lawsuits and trying to get city approval to resume operating. And now the feds are breathing down its neck. Chief Judge Theodore A. McKee of the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and other federal officials have told the National Park Service and city officials that Ride the Ducks' former loading zone along 6th Street north of Market poses a security risk to the federal courthouse.
NEWS
February 18, 2006 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Politicians, port officials and security experts worried aloud yesterday about the Bush administration's decision to allow an Arab company to become a major player in U.S. seaport operations. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey wrote a stern letter asking for details about the process that led to a pending deal's approval by a secretive committee based in the U.S. Treasury Department. Its Newark container terminal is part of the transaction. Sen. Rick Santorum (R., Pa.)
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A lot of people in Conshohocken were happy to see Kiwon Lee buy a vacant, deteriorating corner grocery and begin renovations for a new dry-cleaning store in their small suburban town. Until they saw his very urban plans for security. Lee, a 41-year-old Philadelphia businessman, decided the large plate-glass windows in front would be too big a security risk. So he did what any discerning city merchant would: He installed rolling steel gates over the windows and the front door to prevent nighttime break-ins and vandalism.
NEWS
February 22, 2006 | By William Douglas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush, brushing aside opposition from Democrats and some powerful Republicans, said yesterday that he would veto any effort by Congress to stop a deal allowing a company owned by the United Arab Emirates to run seaports in Philadelphia and five other U.S. cities. "I'm trying to conduct foreign policy by saying to people of the world, 'We'll treat your fairly,' " Bush said aboard Air Force One. "And after careful scrutiny, we believe this deal is a legitimate deal that will not jeopardize the security of the country, and at the same time, sends a signal that we're willing to treat people fairly.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 10 1/2 years, Ailish Nic Phaidin had what she considered a prestigious job - administrative assistant at the U.S. Embassy in Dublin, Ireland. The good pay and working conditions came to an abrupt end on Feb. 26, 1987, when Phaidin was called by her boss and told, without explanation, that she was being fired as a "security risk. " On Monday, a Philadelphia lawyer filed a suit for Phaidin in U.S. District Court here. The suit names Secretary of State George P. Shultz, U.S. Ambassador Margaret M. Heckler and three other embassy officials.
NEWS
July 24, 2005 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Street says that the Philadelphia Gas Works' plan to build a terminal for tankers hauling a liquid form of natural gas "could be a great thing for the city. " When asked about the mayor of Fall River, Mass., who is opposing a similar project in his city for homeland-security reasons, Street said, "Everything poses a security risk these days. " Two LNG projects, two mayors, two very different reactions. How come? The answer may stem from the fact that the PGW project is unlike any other in the country.
NEWS
November 1, 2002 | By PETER DURANTINE
THE SCHWEIKER administration has issued a ruling that, for now, affects only reporters, particularly those who work in the state Capitol newsroom, but has the potential to harm some innocent people. The policy could also adversely affect the way reporters cover state government and thus the news the public is entitled to. Those are my reasons for not submitting to the order that requires reporters to pay $10 for a criminal background check conducted by the state police to determine whether members of the press are a risk to security.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
DEAR HARRY: One of my chief financial concerns is having control of my finances. I have set up a will, legal and medical powers of attorney, etc., through a lawyer who specializes in elder law. I'm still leery of online banking because of the security risk, the risk of errors, the possibility of getting confused. I am nearing 83 years old and feel that I'm slowing down. I'm thinking of setting up an automatic-payment plan to handle my monthly credit-card bill. For years, I have had direct deposit for my Social Security and my pension, as well as automatic payments for all my bills other than my credit card.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Not so long ago, in the name of security, top state House leaders championed the need to give the chamber's guards the power to carry guns. Not anymore. House officials have quietly decided to strip the roughly 16 uniformed guards, who also act as the chamber's sergeants-at-arms, of their firearms. They did so after discovering that one had been carrying a gun for years despite a criminal history. That security officer was fired in early May, and three who supervised him resigned shortly afterward, according to House records and interviews.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | By Wes Conard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An inmate who escaped from the Chester County Farms Prison on Friday was still at large yesterday, although warden Thomas Frame said he did not believe that the inmate presented a great danger to the public. Duane Robert Riley, 41, escaped by jumping a six-foot fence in the recreation yard of the prison's pre-release center Friday afternoon, a day after he was moved into the center because of overcrowding at the prison. He had been incarcerated since August on an 11- to 23-month sentence for terroristic threats against his estranged wife.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2013
WASHINGTON - Defying Republican critics, President Obama named outspoken diplomat Susan Rice as his national security adviser yesterday, giving her a larger voice in U.S. foreign policy despite accusations that she misled the nation in the aftermath of the deadly attack on Americans in Benghazi, Libya. The appointment, along with the nomination of human-rights advocate Samantha Power to replace Rice as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, signals a shift by Obama toward advisers who favor more robust American intervention overseas for humanitarian purposes.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Pablo Gorondi, Associated Press
BUDAPEST, Hungary - Right-wing extremists shout Nazi salutes and attack a man they believe is Jewish. Black-booted militants frighten aging Holocaust survivors. Writings of authors linked to a pro-Nazi regime are recommended reading for schoolchildren. Hungary is seeing a rise in anti-Semitism, which the prime minister is now vowing to fight. Prime Minister Viktor Orban told a gathering of Jewish representatives Sunday that anti-Semitism is "unacceptable and intolerable. " The meeting of the World Jewish Congress is being held in Budapest to draw attention to a rise in anti-Semitism in this Eastern European country.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
DEAR HARRY: One of my chief financial concerns is having control of my finances. I have set up a will, legal and medical powers of attorney, etc., through a lawyer who specializes in elder law. I'm still leery of online banking because of the security risk, the risk of errors, the possibility of getting confused. I am nearing 83 years old and feel that I'm slowing down. I'm thinking of setting up an automatic-payment plan to handle my monthly credit-card bill. For years, I have had direct deposit for my Social Security and my pension, as well as automatic payments for all my bills other than my credit card.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Richard Seifman
We have to move away from the divisive "guns or no guns" debate to avert a cycle of senseless violence. Vice President Biden and his new task force on gun violence should consider the long-term potential of new technology to address the problem. We have tried a variety of approaches, including background checks under the Brady bill, the assault-weapons ban, increased police protection, and public awareness campaigns. These options may have temporarily or partly addressed the problem, but none have worked well.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
Questions that need answers Journalists need to pursue the following questions concerning the resignation of CIA Director David H. Petraeus ("Lawmakers question FBI probe of Petraeus," Monday): How does a journalist/author deal with a source with whom there is a sexual relationship? And vice versa? Both of them are compromised, right? And if the source is the head of the CIA, then there is no limit to the end of questions that raises. When will someone ask them? If the FBI seemingly stumbled on this relationship, when did the FBI director know?
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Not so long ago, in the name of security, top state House leaders championed the need to give the chamber's guards the power to carry guns. Not anymore. House officials have quietly decided to strip the roughly 16 uniformed guards, who also act as the chamber's sergeants-at-arms, of their firearms. They did so after discovering that one had been carrying a gun for years despite a criminal history. That security officer was fired in early May, and three who supervised him resigned shortly afterward, according to House records and interviews.
NEWS
January 13, 2011 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
Ride the Ducks has its work cut out for it in Philadelphia. The duck-boat company is facing a number of lawsuits and trying to get city approval to resume operating. And now the feds are breathing down its neck. Chief Judge Theodore A. McKee of the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and other federal officials have told the National Park Service and city officials that Ride the Ducks' former loading zone along 6th Street north of Market poses a security risk to the federal courthouse.
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
And now, for something completely bizarre featuring a rapping rodent named G-Hog and a gaggle of flashdancers trying to get teenagers interested in health careers. Clearly, I'm in need of some counter-programming after all the gun violence and vicious political ads of recent weeks. But how to do justice to one of the strangest uses of $4,157 in taxpayer money in Pennsylvania history? I'm talking about the Department of Labor and Industry promoting Health Careers Week (Nov. 5-9)
NEWS
August 18, 2007 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A plan to move Camden County probation offices from Camden to an office complex between Routes 38 and 70 has some Cherry Hill residents up in arms. Flyers protesting the move were sent out Thursday by the Woodland Civic Association, a neighborhood association, to businesses and hundreds of homes in the township. "We are concerned about safety, the additional burden on the Cherry Hill police, the value of our property, the effect on area businesses and the image of our community," the flyer reads.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moving the Regional Produce Market to the Navy Yard would create serious security risks and block major growth at the Port of Philadelphia, maritime business and labor leaders said yesterday. Uwe Schulz, president of the Ports of the Delaware River Marine Trade Association, pressed port officials to fight a plan by Gov. Rendell and State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.) to put the new produce terminal on the Navy Yard site, just south of the port. The association is the employer group that hires labor for the port.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|