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Security Systems

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LIVING
January 1, 1993 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Alexander!" hollered Larry Schwalb into his living room. "Yes, Master?" replied a male voice. "Telephone!" Schwalb called out, to put him on alert. "OK," said the invisible voice. "Police!" hollered Schwalb, a former professional magician. "As you wish," Alexander replied oh-so-calmly. Seconds later, high-tech telephone noises tweeted out of a glossy black box on Schwalb's coffee table. The box was Alexander. Alexander, once Schwalb programs him, will be able to get through to police.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | New York Daily News
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors regularly try to sneak items (such as plastic guns) past airport security devices and human inspectors. The agents have succeeded an undisclosed number of times, and the FAA recently fined the airlines responsible for maintaining the security systems $1 million. Among those assessed penalties: United ($215,000), Northwest ($156,000), Delta ($113,000) and American ($96,000), the FAA reported.
NEWS
April 28, 1988 | By Stanley Bailey, Special to The Inquirer
Saying they lead to serious manpower problems and unnecessary stress for his police officers, the chief of the Upper Providence Police Department wants to decrease the number of false alarms received in the township. Chief Thomas J. Davis said he saw the answer to his problem in enforcement of a new township ordinance governing the use and installation of residential and commercial security systems. Davis said that false alarms divert officers from their normal patrols and increase their stress levels because most of the calls come at night, "and the officers have to search homes with heavy shrubbery and unfamiliar terrain.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1989 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
K-Tron International Inc., the Pitman firm that makes industrial feeders and blenders and security systems, reported gains in revenue and profits for the fourth quarter and all of 1988. But the firm expected lower earnings for the current first quarter. "The 1988 results continue to remain on target with K-Tron's five-year plan of increasing revenues at an average of 20 percent per year while achieving commensurate improvement in earnings," Leo C. Beebe, the firm's chairman and chief executive, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2008 | By Akos Beothy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tyco International Ltd. said yesterday that its ADT security business had agreed to acquire FirstService Security, of Collegeville, for about $187 million. FirstService Security, a division of FirstService Corp., provides integrated security systems for homes and businesses. It has annual revenue of $200 million and employs 2,400 people at 17 offices in the United States and Canada. Out of the total workforce, 150 work in Southeastern Pennsylvania - in offices in Collegeville, Valley Forge and Reading, said Ann Lindstrom, director of corporate communications at ADT Security Services Inc. ADT calls the deal a strategic acquisition, giving ADT Security access to new markets in the banking sector in Canada and in the petrochemicals industry in Canada and the United States, Lindstrom said.
NEWS
October 24, 2002 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two former Philadelphia Gas Works executives accused of stealing nearly $70,000 in PGW funds for home improvements committed no crime, their attorneys argued yesterday, because they had the authority to use the money to purchase costly security systems and gas lanterns. Former chief executive officer James Hawes 3d and former chief operating officer Gregory Martin are charged with theft and conspiracy for allegedly spending PGW money at their Chestnut Hill homes. If convicted, they face up to seven years in prison.
NEWS
August 9, 1999 | By Brooks Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
J. Matthew Ladd whips what looks like a credit card from his slacks and waves it with flair in front of an all-but-invisible pad mounted next to an unmarked door in the depths of his company's headquarters. The door swings open, heavily, and Ladd, vice president of a security firm called the Protection Bureau, strides into a room that looks something like the bridge of the Starship Enterprise. Computers, closed-circuit televisions, and twinkling control panels clutter the room, which is fortified with special fire walls and a backup power supply.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The witnesses described how the crime had shattered their shared belief in urban neighborliness and safety in South Philadelphia's Bella Vista section. On Friday, the man who admitted the crime that fractured Bella Vista was sentenced to 311/2 to 63 years in prison for the rape last March of a barista at a popular local coffee shop. Christopher Reeves, 33, a man whose lawyer said began a life of homelessness and chronic drug use at age 12, said nothing before he was sentenced by Common Pleas Court Judge William J. Mazzola.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Computer hackers traced to China stole personal data belonging to 4.5 million patients who used hospitals owned by Community Health Systems, which includes 20 hospitals in Pennsylvania and one in South Jersey. The stolen information included patient names, addresses, birth dates, and telephone and Social Security numbers, but not credit card or medical information, according to a report filed with the federal government by Community Health. "The company is providing appropriate notification to affected patients and regulatory agencies as required by law," the report said.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
There aren't enough locksmiths or even locks. Keys are routinely missing. Lightning knocks out security systems. Light bulbs along the perimeters are gone. And that's just the beginning of the problems at the city's prisons, according to a 750-page consultant's report that the Rendell administration filed yesterday with a federal judge. While the long-awaited report details a host of problems affecting inmates' quality of life, some of the most surprising findings involve the very thing prisons are supposed to provide - security.
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NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Voters sunk a measure Tuesday to make facility improvements at Sterling High School in Camden County that would have required increases in real estate taxes. In Paulsboro, Gloucester County, voters said yes to higher taxes to improve schools. The Sterling tally was 620 against and 538 in favor, said John Keenan, the municipal clerk for Stratford and Magnolia. Those numbers included mail-in ballots. The Sterling question sought voters' approval of renovations including roof replacement, heating and air-conditioning replacement, new security doors, and improvements to athletic and performing-arts facilities.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Computer hackers traced to China stole personal data belonging to 4.5 million patients who used hospitals owned by Community Health Systems, which includes 20 hospitals in Pennsylvania and one in South Jersey. The stolen information included patient names, addresses, birth dates, and telephone and Social Security numbers, but not credit card or medical information, according to a report filed with the federal government by Community Health. "The company is providing appropriate notification to affected patients and regulatory agencies as required by law," the report said.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2013
In the Region Ryland scoops up Cornell California's Ryland Homes has acquired Cornell Homes in Media. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed, said Ryland spokesman Drew Mackintosh. Cornell, with 12 active developments in the Pennsylvania and New Jersey suburbs, has 97 houses under sales contracts and controls 1,716 buildable lots, Ryland said. All of Cornell's current employees are expected to join Ryland, based in Westlake Village, Calif. Greg Lingo, Cornell's president, will be Ryland's area division president.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Gene Johnson, Associated Press
SEATTLE - Officials in Washington state took their first stab Thursday at setting rules for the state's new marijuana industry, nearly eight months after voters here legalized pot for adults. Among the preliminary regulations: They want to track marijuana from "seed to store. " They'd put a cap on the number of retail outlets in each county, but not on the number of licensed pot growers or processors. No sales of what the board described as marijuana extracts, such as hash, would be allowed - unless the extract is infused into another product - and all pot-related businesses would have to have security systems, 24-hour video surveillance, and insurance.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama's Homeland Security chief toured Drexel University on Tuesday and announced the Philadelphia school is one of seven U.S. colleges that will participate in a federal pilot program to improve emergency preparedness on campus. "A crisis can happen on campus without notice," said Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano. "Drexel has been a true leader when it comes to campus safety. " Napolitano noted that Drexel was ranked third among higher-education institutions that promote campus security according to the 2012 Security 500 report prepared by SecurityMagazine.com that surveyed more than 20 campuses.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
The new Copyright Alert System that went into effect last week is a weak response to the rampant Internet theft of music, films, games, and television programs. But it's better than doing nothing to combat the wrongheaded assertion that intellectual property should be free to anyone who can grab it. Artists deserve to be compensated for their efforts, and so should the companies that take risks to promote and distribute their work. Stealing songs and movies to pass among friends or to sell in a black market robs the originators of their incomes.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The witnesses described how the crime had shattered their shared belief in urban neighborliness and safety in South Philadelphia's Bella Vista section. On Friday, the man who admitted the crime that fractured Bella Vista was sentenced to 311/2 to 63 years in prison for the rape last March of a barista at a popular local coffee shop. Christopher Reeves, 33, a man whose lawyer said began a life of homelessness and chronic drug use at age 12, said nothing before he was sentenced by Common Pleas Court Judge William J. Mazzola.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens
More and more American homes are being burglarized, the Associated Press reports - all in pursuit of gold, whose price peaked last month at $1,891 an ounce. Gold rings, gold chains, gold bracelets, gold earrings. Getting rid of them is easy - they can be melted down and sold, no evidence left, unlike hot TVs or laptops. For homeowners, there are at least a couple of ways to look at this distressing trend. First: How to protect your house from break-ins. Second: How to keep your losses to a minimum if a burglary does occur.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carl M. Campbell Jr., 79, who developed computer-security systems from his home office in Newtown Square, died Sunday, June 26, of pneumonia at Bryn Mawr Hospital. A son, Carl M. 3d, said Mr. Campbell closed his home-based firm, Transaction Security Products, in 2003. His son said that, during much of his career, Mr. Campbell "was chiefly involved with the application of cryptography for the protection of electronic financial-messaging systems. "He was also integral in the development of national and international standards currently in use for protection of electronic financial data throughout the world.
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