CollectionsSeder
IN THE NEWS

Seder

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / BILL CAIN
A model Passover seder was held on Wednesday for the kindergarten students at Abrams Hebrew Academy in Yardley. The reading from the Torah and the eating of symbolic foods like bitter herbs were an introduction to the kindergartners to the traditions of the Jewish holiday. The seder, one of three held for students at the school, was put together by Gali Ben Shacher and teachers Sonia Arusy, Freda Hanover and Jackie Katz.
NEWS
April 18, 2008 | By Terri Akman
What I love the most about being Jewish is following traditions that go back thousands of years. Of all those traditions, my favorite by far is our family Passover seder. Each year, my husband's extended family gathers in the recreation hall of my in-laws' condo building in Baltimore. Four generations of people who rarely see each other throughout the rest of the year come from Florida, North Carolina, Washington and New Jersey. Though our numbers fluctuate from year to year, we typically share this amazing tradition with about 50 loved ones.
NEWS
May 4, 2005 | By LLOYD WILLIAMS
"This is the bread of affliction which our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt; let all those who are hungry enter and eat thereof; and all who are in distress come and celebrate the Passover. " - The Passover Blessing NORMAN ROCKWELL (1894-1978), the quintessential illustrator of the common man, is best remembered for capturing on canvas an array of slice-of-life tableaus of 20th-century Americana. "Golden Rule," perhaps his most socially conscious creation, graced the cover of the April 1, 1961, Saturday Evening Post, a date that fell right between the start of Passover (March 31)
FOOD
April 12, 1989 | By Ethel G. Hofman, Special to The Inquirer
The house is modest clapboard, with a faded black-and-white sign - "Zawid's Catering" - swinging in the sea breeze. But step inside and you'll meet Rose Zawid, the undisputed queen of kosher cooking in South Jersey. "They come from everywhere" she said proudly of her Atlantic City establishment - "from Philadelphia, Cherry Hill and New York. Even Jackie Mason visits, but when he comes," she chuckled, "he tells me to keep this place a secret. " The Jewish holiday of Passover, which begins next Wednesday evening and lasts for eight days, is the busiest time of the year for Zawid.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The huge room buzzed with Russian as the new immigrants waited to taste the foods and hear the prayers of their first seder. Organizers scurried among the 160 men, women and children, delivering another plate of matzo here, another bottle of wine there, until all 12 tables were fully prepared. The double symbolism of the ceremony on Monday night, the first night of Passover, was as poignant as it was obvious. The ritual meal, a commemoration of the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt, was also a celebration of the participants' emigration from the Soviet Union during the last year.
FOOD
March 27, 1988 | By Ethel G. Hofman, Special to The Inquirer
A deep chuckle accompanied the phone invitation. "Just come round to the Manor House, dear - we call it the Jewish Vatican - and we'll have a spot of lunch. " Thus was a visitor introduced to Rabbi Lionel Blue, whose offbeat humor, blended with old-fashioned wisdom, has made his name a household word in Britain. Meeting him in person offers another surprise. Witty, charming and dressed in hat and comfy tweeds, Rabbi Blue, 57, looks like a country squire. He makes you laugh and, instantly, you and he are friends.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
  So you're hosting the second seder of the Passover holiday? Your guests have already been to Monday's first-night ritual meal that commemorates the freedom of the Israelites from slavery. That host got the excitement and anticipation that comes with being first. Now what? With the right amount of planning, local rabbis say, the second seder on Tuesday can be the star. That's because a new mix of guests, different venues, and inventive interpretations make the second night of the eight-day holiday as exciting - if not more exciting - than the first.
NEWS
May 25, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jewish military families celebrating the return of loved ones from Iraq now have a ritual that adapts the themes and rites of Passover to mark the occasion. The "Seder of Safe Return" is designed to welcome home members of the armed services and give people who gather for the ritual meal a chance to reflect. "One of the things that religious rituals do is to give us structure in which to pour our deep feelings - a wedding, a funeral, the birth of a child," said Rabbi Harold S. Kushner, the renowned spirituality author, who co-created the ceremony.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You would think, said Bob Seltzer, that in 1992 it wouldn't be necessary for Jews and blacks to keep reminding each other that they have similar histories. You would think, the Cheltenham resident said, that the stifling remnants of slavery would be long dead, and that there would be no need to reminisce about that common past. Dream on, Seltzer said. Reminders are still crucial. Reminders such as Tuesday's model Passover seder for black and Jewish families at Zoar United Methodist Church in North Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011
As the playbook for the Passover seder, the Haggadah has two roles. It retells the story of the Exodus, and it gives the family cook an opportunity to dust off once-a-year recipes that are eaten to symbolize key parts of the narrative. This recipe for horseradish sauce (symbolizing the bitterness of slavery) hails from the Alsace region of France, where horseradish may have first entered the Passover cook's repertoire, according to food writer Joan Nathan. It's from her latest cookbook, Quiches, Kugels and Couscous: My Search for Jewish Cooking in France.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
At her family's Passover seder last April, Rabbi Debra Orenstein opted for the layered look: an ordinary T-shirt topped by a purple-and-black blouse made in India - and very likely sewn in a sweatshop by slave labor. At the moment when the seder's leader typically holds up a piece of matzo and declares, "This is the bread of affliction" - symbolizing the ancient Israelites' enslavement and hasty flight from Egypt - Orenstein startled her guests by peeling off the Indian blouse. "This," she announced, "is the shirt of affliction!"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
This weekend welcomes two holidays. There will be Easter eggs and candy for some, seders and matzo for others, as Christians celebrate Easter on Sunday and Jews begin their eight-day observance of Passover at sundown Friday.   Easter If you're celebrating Easter, here are a few places where you can hop on down the bunny trail. Let the great egg hunt begin! Stenton Easter Egg Hunt. 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday. Search for eggs and chocolates at the colonial home of William Penn's secretary James Logan.
FOOD
March 27, 2015 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Most cultures have traditions and rituals that herald spring. Who isn't grateful for signs leading toward a season of abundance and growth after the scarcity of winter? Many of these traditions feature eggs, from traditional Easter egg hunts, to the Cimburijada festival of scrambled eggs in Zenica, Bosnia - where 1,500 eggs will be cooked for the town to share the official moment spring begins - to Egypt's Sham El-Nissim holiday, celebrated back to the time of the pharaohs with spring onions and colored eggs.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
It was April, and Judith Helfand was dreading her first motherless Mother's Day. Since her mother died in September, the award-winning filmmaker had a hole in her heart. Compounding the hollowness, she was en route to her first parentless Passover seder. A casualty of a pharmaceutical time bomb, Helfand could not have biological children. After her mother, Florence, miscarried in 1963, the doctor prescribed the "miracle drug" diethylstilbestrol (DES) so it wouldn't happen again. The next year, she gave birth to Judith, who grew up and - like one in every 1,000 DES daughters - developed cervical cancer.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
  So you're hosting the second seder of the Passover holiday? Your guests have already been to Monday's first-night ritual meal that commemorates the freedom of the Israelites from slavery. That host got the excitement and anticipation that comes with being first. Now what? With the right amount of planning, local rabbis say, the second seder on Tuesday can be the star. That's because a new mix of guests, different venues, and inventive interpretations make the second night of the eight-day holiday as exciting - if not more exciting - than the first.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
If you're the kind of person who likes to cozy up to the sedate, traditional Passover seders led by the family patriarch, a recent evening at the Gershman Y in Philadelphia might have thrown you for a loop. Tap dancer Germaine Ingram was executing a soulful routine as violinist Diane Monroe accompanied her, expressing the doubt and hope of American slaves upon learning that slavery was abolished. Not a Jewish reference specifically, but surely one to which Jewish history could relate.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
Sunday Love in the garrets Puccini's indelible story of impoverished artists in 1830s Paris, La Bohème , was first performed in London's Covent Garden in 1897. A film of the Royal Opera's January production screens at 12:30 p.m. at the Ambler Theater , 91 E. Court St., Doylestown. Tickets are $18. Call 215-348-1878. King and country Shakespeare's Henry V sees the former wastrel prince wearing the crown and leading his underdog army into war and a hard-fought peace, armed with some of the Bard's most rousing speeches.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
Scottish eyes will be smiling April 2, as Bruce Williams, owner of Williams Brothers Brewery, in Alloa, Scotland, drops by Devil's Den (1148 S. 11th St., 215-339-0855, devilsdenphilly.com ) to discuss the family biz. Among the brews he'll bring along are a hand-pumped firkin of Grozet, brewed with gooseberries, plus bottles of Fraoch Heather Ale, whose recipe dates back to 2000 B.C. Scottish food will supplement the menu for the evening, which begins at 7 p.m. Tickets go on sale Friday for the Do AC Boardwalk Wine Promenade, an outdoor wine festival featuring 150 wines presented at seven destinations along the Boardwalk, May 4-5. $75. doatlanticcity.com , 800-736-1420.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
* The word seder is Hebrew for "order. " The order of things for the Passover meal gets tweaked a bit as Ross M. Levy, Ken Ulansey's Whirled Music, storyteller Jos Duncan and magician Ran'd Shine, plus members of BalletX, headline The Philadelphia Seder March 17 at the Bellevue Hotel (Broad & Walnut streets) Master of ceremonies is Rabbi Eli Freedman, of Rodeph Shalom synagogue. Tix are $80 adults, $60 full-time students. 215-545-4400 or gershmany.org . * There's still room at the bountiful table - make that tableau - that is The Brewer's Plate, 5:30-9 p.m. Sunday at the National Constitution Center (525 Arch St.)
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Joyce Gemperlein, FOR THE INQUIRER
I grew up in a rural town where there were only two Jewish families and, although one of the boys was a close friend in high school, I never thought to ask him what he was eating instead of the tuna noodle casserole and other standbys we Catholics were consuming. With age came diverse neighbors and brazen mooching at their tables, especially on holidays. I've now been to a multitude of Passover seders and have heard for two types of food-related conversations there: ones about heirloom Jewish family recipes that commemorate the ancient Israelites' hasty flight from slavery in Egypt; and spirited debates about what is acceptable to eat on the holiday, which this year begins at sunset on Friday with the ritual seder dinner and continues for seven days.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|