CollectionsSeedlings
IN THE NEWS

Seedlings

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
There are nearly 5,000 school gardens across the United States, living lessons that sprout on rooftops and lawns, in greenhouses and classrooms. Of the 133 in Pennsylvania, one of the more fruitful flourishes in a former courtyard at Bucks County's Bristol Middle-High School, where 4,000 plants occupy 30,000 neatly-tended square feet. A small farm, really. In four years, the garden has grown to 21 raised beds, with an herb wall, a pond graced by a waterfall, a cistern, arbors, tree-shaded picnic benches, and a new vermiculture system in which worms turn food waste into nutrient-rich compost.
LIVING
February 23, 1986 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
If Willard Horner Sr. and Willard Jr. can produce successful crops of eggplant on 15 acres, it seems illogical that my gardening partner and I can't manage to keep even six plants in good shape through the summer. When we started gardening 15 years ago, it was a breeze. We had eggplant coming out of our ears. We fried it and froze it until we never wanted to see it again. During the last few summers, however, the plants have looked wonderful until about the beginning of July.
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | By Michele Riedel, Special to The Inquirer
Tomorrow is Arbor Day, and in the spirit of this annual celebration of tree planting, groups and municipalities are urging citizens to "green up" their communities. In the name of Arbor Day, tree enthusiasts will be selling seedlings. Their greatest hope, nature and man willing, is that the seedling sold today will be a lofty shade or fragrant flowering tree in years to come. "When you plant a tree today, you're really planting it for future generations," said Robert Montgomery Jr., chairman of the Abington Township Environmental Advisory Council.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
Across 10 snow-covered acres of the New Jersey Pine Barrens last weekend, 75 Brownies and bikers, Pioneers and students - all volunteers - dug into the drenched soil and planted 10,000 yellow pine seedlings that they hoped would become 70-foot trees. Eight Brownies from Eastampton's Troop 332 planted 500 of the foot-high, one-year-old seedlings. Three AT&T Pioneers, members of a service group of retired and veteran employees, teamed up to root more than 600 of the wispy, leggy seedlings.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Q: We have two cats, and I need some suggestions on how to get them to leave the houseplants alone. A: Give your cats their own plants and make yours harder to get to. That way you can both be happy. For your cat's chewing pleasure, always keep a pot of tender grass seedlings - rye, alfalfa and wheat - growing in a sunny spot. Parsley and thyme are herbs that many cats enjoy smelling and chewing, and both can be grown indoors. Catnip is a natural, but the herb is so appealing to some cats that they just won't leave it alone.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Although the 20th anniversary of Earth Day is not until April 22, the State Forestry Service isn't waiting until that time to celebrate. Begun two decades ago to make people more aware of the environment, Earth Day is frequently celebrated with local cleanup efforts. But in the Lebanon State Forest in Pemberton and Woodland Townships, Earth Day will be marked by planting trees - up to 200,000 of them. To get all those seedlings planted, state forestry officials are asking residents and groups to help them Saturday at the Lebanon site.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Early morning is the best time to hold teachers workshops because that's the time of day when teachers are best prepared to learn, some educators say. But what to do with the students while their teachers are in the classroom is often a headache for working parents. After studying the issue for some time, the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District thinks it has found a scheduling solution: a child-care program called the Seedlings. "When we asked George (Slick, the superintendent)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Refresh houseplants. It's warm enough to move houseplants outdoors to the deck, patio or a bare spot in the garden. Even if you can only garden indoors, take time to check each plant to see what "refreshment" - repotting, fertilizing, pruning - is needed. If roots reach through drain holes, transplant to a container three to six inches larger in diameter. Add enough fresh potting soil in the bottom and sides, positioning the plant's soil surface to be at the same level as in the previous container.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Alice Szarek showed up for a meeting with a basket full of pepper seedlings in late April, I figured I had to find out more about her gardening activities. "Our family," she said, "is mad about peppers. We use them fresh in salads, stuffed and fried, but most of all, we love to char them on the barbecue. I even freeze a whole lot so we can have them throughout the winter. " Szarek has been growing peppers in Bucks County with her husband, Bob, for several years, but this year things got out of control.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2016
Entrepreneurship might seem like an odd word to associate with Cuba, but it seems increasingly apt, given the individuals I met during a week traveling the island. From the tobacco fields three hours outside of Havana to downtown restaurants that rival the finest Philadelphia has to offer, one can find the seedlings of capitalism and businesses built for profit sprouting everywhere. Don't misunderstand. Cuba remains a nation of great disappointment and contradiction. Friendly people live amid spectacular scenery but are nevertheless trapped in a socialist system that never delivered on the promises of the revolution.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
There are nearly 5,000 school gardens across the United States, living lessons that sprout on rooftops and lawns, in greenhouses and classrooms. Of the 133 in Pennsylvania, one of the more fruitful flourishes in a former courtyard at Bucks County's Bristol Middle-High School, where 4,000 plants occupy 30,000 neatly-tended square feet. A small farm, really. In four years, the garden has grown to 21 raised beds, with an herb wall, a pond graced by a waterfall, a cistern, arbors, tree-shaded picnic benches, and a new vermiculture system in which worms turn food waste into nutrient-rich compost.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant kale and zinnias as fillers. Whether caused by critters or seasonal change, you may have some empty patches in the garden. It's the perfect time to plant kale; it will tolerate cooler fall temperatures and be free from the cabbage worms that are known to munch on mature leaves up until early July. If you start more zinnia seeds now, the younger plants will be ready to replace the zinnias you planted in May that may eventually succumb to powdery mildew. If you don't have any seed or seedlings, then buy, beg or barter to get them.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Q: We have two cats, and I need some suggestions on how to get them to leave the houseplants alone. A: Give your cats their own plants and make yours harder to get to. That way you can both be happy. For your cat's chewing pleasure, always keep a pot of tender grass seedlings - rye, alfalfa and wheat - growing in a sunny spot. Parsley and thyme are herbs that many cats enjoy smelling and chewing, and both can be grown indoors. Catnip is a natural, but the herb is so appealing to some cats that they just won't leave it alone.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fifth graders at Elwood Kindle Elementary School in Pitman spent months digging up the history of the chestnut tree before planting two seedlings bred specifically for longevity. But it was much quicker for someone to yank the fledgling two-foot trees from the ground and uproot the environmental project. The two chestnut trees, planted in May as part of a fifth-grade science project and national competition, were discovered missing Friday after a student scheduled to tend them visited school grounds.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Tracie Cone, Associated Press
  SEQUOIA NATIONAL PARK, Calif. - On a clear day, the view from Beetle Rock in Sequoia National Park extends west for 105 miles across the patchwork of crops in California's agricultural heartland to the Coast Mountains and the Pacific Ocean beyond. The problem is there are few clear days, even at 6,200 feet. The Sierra Nevada forest that is home to the biggest and among the oldest living things on earth - the giant Sequoia redwoods - also suffers a dubious distinction.
NEWS
July 9, 2010 | By Michael Martin Mills, Inquirer Columnist
Question: My six rose of Sharon shrubs drop so many seeds, which ultimately germinate into hundreds of little seedlings. I try to cultivate the ground in the bed every couple of days. I put down Preen. I put down mulch. It takes me hours to weed this bed. What else should I do? - Marie Klincewicz Answer: Ah the fecundity of Hibiscus syriacus, also known as rose of Sharon or, in my Southern youth, althea (accent on the first syllable). Get ahead of the seedlings by deadheading the plants before the seeds mature - remove the seedpods when the flowers fade, or some time in the fall.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|