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LIVING
April 25, 1995 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Be polite. Be on time. Follow up on those telephone calls, and be kind to secretaries. That's the kind of advice you'd give to any job seeker. But what can you tell the twentysomethings? Bradley G. Richardson has a few suggestions. How about reminding them to keep their body piercings covered up? Or, don't wear high-top sneakers to the big interview. And do make sure that the message on your answering machine doesn't say, "Dude, I can't come to the phone right now 'cause I'm out partying!"
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | For The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
Tubing down the river on a sunny afternoon in July is a good way to beat the heat. Seekers of cool head for a bus that will take them upriver from a Point Pleasant tube-rental spot on the Delaware. As temperatures rise, they'll have lots of company.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
If you were wearing a blue-bordered name tag at Monday's Senior Shared Housing open house in Audubon, you probably were looking for someone with a yellow one, and vice versa. The color-coded stickers were the way homeowners (blue) could be distinguished from home-seekers (yellow) in the group of about 50 people. The system has worked well for the Camden County Senior Shared Housing Program, which has endeavored for the last seven years to match those looking for housing, with homeowners who have space to share.
NEWS
December 28, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bring together a random sampling of parents, and their child-rearing horror stories are likely to be similar. There is the 12-year-old who "forgets" his homework, the 15-year-old who decides to skip class, and the 10-year-old who argues over everything. They are not drug-dealing, car-stealing bad children, said psychologist Thomas N. Tavantzis. They are just frustrating because they are underachievers. "An underachiever is a good kid who has average to above-average intelligence, is not learning-disabled or emotionally damaged, but who is academically dead in the water," Tavantzis said.
NEWS
February 13, 2014
Hoop dreams The communities of Abington and Neshaminy should be recognized for the absolutely incredible sportsmanship demonstrated by their varsity basketball teams and coaches last weekend when a Bensalem student with Down syndrome was included in their basketball games ("A special player helps lift Bensalem," Feb. 9). The four-year member of our team who serves as team manager, Kevin Grow, took the court and forged memories for himself and all of us who had the pleasure of watching this fine young man score numerous points.
NEWS
June 30, 2004 | By Brendan McCarthy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been 100 years since Dr. Henry Minton, a local physician and pharmacist, gathered five Philadelphia colleagues to form the nation's first African American fraternity. To mark this milestone, nearly 3,000 members and family members of the Grand Boule of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity are attending a weeklong conference here this week. The fraternity includes high-profile African American civic leaders, business executives and politicians. "It's all about being part of the movers and shakers of the African American community across the country," former Mayor W. Wilson Goode Sr. said yesterday.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after the recession's "official" end in June 2009, about 12 million people remain unemployed, with more than three jobless people for every opening, the U.S. Labor Department reports. So why do employers constantly whine about their inability to find the talent they need from an applicant pool that they say lacks skills, rudimentary educational abilities, and even a willingness to work? Sitting in his office at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton management professor Peter Cappelli asked himself the same question.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tri-County Security is looking for a few good security guards. Bobby Fisher, 26, a student at Burlington County Community College, is looking for a job. Bobby, meet Tri-County Security. Tri-County Security, meet Bobby. This introduction was one of the hundreds at yesterday's "Jobs for the Future" fair at the Burlington Center mall, a joint production of the Burlington County Chamber of Commerce, the New Jersey Department of Labor and Assembly members Diane Allen and Carmine DeSopo, Seventh District Republicans.
NEWS
May 19, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The voice is not especially loud. But when the unassuming man - bearded, balding, graying hair, average height - entered the Havertown church and, eyes closed, began speaking, his resonant, almost theatrical tones made even the skeptics sit up straight in their hard wooden pews. "Greetings and blessings in the many names of the divine," the mystic intoned slowly. "Peace be with you. " Daniel Clay - His Divine Grace to his followers - is a freelance holy man. He is a dash of Southern preacher with a dose of New Age seer thrown in. He has published a book of prophecies, and he has run for president.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | By William J. Byron
His name is Michael and he is one of the lucky ones. It took him just three months after losing one job to find another. Some of the men and women I interviewed for a recent study of mid-career, white-collar job loss have been out for three years and are still looking. An accountant by training, Michael was one of the more efficient job seekers I encountered among the 150 displaced managers who talked to me about their experience of unemployment. After a top-level, commendation-studded executive career for 25 years with the Internal Revenue Service, Michael left government to become a banker in the private sector.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Job applicants no longer need to disclose any criminal history when applying to work for Montgomery County, which on Thursday joined cities and counties across the country in waiving the requirement. The new policy is aimed at helping those who are leaving jail find employment and reduce their chances of being rearrested, said Josh Shapiro, chairman of the county commissioners. "Montgomery County has now officially banned the box, and that is the box that often shuts people out from second chances," he said, referring to the box that candidates check on applications if they have been convicted of a crime.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
For months, Tiesha Smith had dreamed of ringing the bell. Sometimes, a week would pass without the sound of it. Then, while sitting in one of her job- training classes at the workforce development agency Philadelphia Works, she would hear it peal. As in It's a Wonderful Life , the sound of the bell meant someone had received wings. It meant someone had landed a job. And now, they were ringing the brass bell in the lobby - "the sweet bell of success" - to celebrate, to let everyone know.
NEWS
February 14, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For the Daily News
SINCE ITS founding two years ago, the Center for Contemporary Mysticism (CfCM) at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Chestnut Hill has aimed to stretch the boundaries of what's sacred. Its members seek ways to "connect with things spiritual and mystical in the world when we might not be looking for it or even recognize it as such," says Joseph Irwin, the center's coordinator. The group's eclectic events programming - including talks by visiting authors and mystics, and classes in mindfulness and meditation - is already attracting hundreds of patrons.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
AOL co-founder Steve Case wants to take in entrepreneurs' new ideas, to pick their brains, before picking one to receive an investment of $100,000. "The idea has to be more than a scribble on a paper napkin," he said Monday. "There has to be something to show, a product with some momentum that needs a boost of cash but hasn't gotten big enough to get the interest of venture capitalists. " Case has been on this mission for a year or so, clocking 3,000 miles on a bus, visiting towns (14 so far)
NEWS
March 31, 2015
ISSUE | FREE TRADE With each new deal, more jobs leave What a disappointment it was to read former Gov. Ed Rendell's endorsement of yet another expansion of supposed free trade between the United States and Asia ("For the middle class, trade issues are crucial," March 20). Apparently, Rendell belongs to that group of politicians who actually believe the expansion of trade provides a net benefit to the American worker and the U.S. economy, rather than the sad truth that these moves often promote more imports than exports for our country.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Villanova University law professor Michele Pistone sensed the growing problem in the nation's asylum system even before new data released this month presented a stark picture of the backlog. "For 15 years, I could count on getting appointments for [asylum] interviews" promptly at the regional office in Newark, N.J., she said. "Students could start a [client's] case and have it adjudicated by the end of the semester. "This year, for the first time, that's not happening," she said, and appointments her students requested in September still have no interview dates.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Mark Manzoni, a bartender at the doomed Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, has a manila envelope in his hand and a smile on his face. "I just got a job," the Galloway Township resident says. "My last shift at Revel ends at 8 a.m. on Labor Day, and I go down to Maryland Sept. 2. " Manzoni, 50, was the first to arrive and the first hired during the job fair sponsored Tuesday and Wednesday by the Maryland Live! Casino. With the Atlantic Club already dark and Revel, Showboat, and Trump Plaza scheduled to shut down within weeks, an estimated 8,000 Atlantic City casino workers will have lost their jobs this year.
NEWS
February 13, 2014
Hoop dreams The communities of Abington and Neshaminy should be recognized for the absolutely incredible sportsmanship demonstrated by their varsity basketball teams and coaches last weekend when a Bensalem student with Down syndrome was included in their basketball games ("A special player helps lift Bensalem," Feb. 9). The four-year member of our team who serves as team manager, Kevin Grow, took the court and forged memories for himself and all of us who had the pleasure of watching this fine young man score numerous points.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
WE APPLAUD Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane's decision to bring criminal charges against XTO, a gas driller, for a few reasons. First among them is that Kane's move is a strike against a culture. Not the culture of "Welcome to Pennsylvania - Drill wherever you want," but the culture of major corporations inflicting damage - human, environmental, financial - and making the problem go away with cash or a wrist slap. Consider, for example, the West Virginia coal-mine explosion that killed 29 workers in 2010.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Nicolaus Mills
The new The Lone Ranger , with Armie Hammer as the Lone Ranger and Johnny Depp as Tonto, never misses a chance to poke fun at the myth of the American West. The campy film includes a madam with an ivory leg, an outlaw who carves the hearts out of his victims, and a Lone Ranger who constantly abandons Tonto. Too much camp, for sure, but as someone who grew up listening to The Lone Ranger on radio, I'm grateful that this latest Lone Ranger doesn't challenge my generation's straight-arrow version of him. I was enough of a fan to realize that if I fiddled with the radio dial long enough, I could find a second radio station that played The Lone Ranger at a different time.
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