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Senate Hearing

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NEWS
October 21, 1991 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Soap Opera City. Since only Justice-designate Clarence Thomas and Professor Anita Hill know what happened between them, the rest of us are left trying to evaluate credibility and to figure out why it became such a procedural mess. Seems to me one of the first points that needs to be addressed is the misplaced anger aimed at Hill by some senators and others, blaming her for the timing of her allegations against Thomas. Sen. Strom Thurmond, in a stupefying display of hypocrisy, demanded to know: "Why didn't they come forward if they had something against him?
NEWS
May 1, 1997 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Chris Mondics of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Attorney General Janet Reno and the Senate Judiciary Committee gathered yesterday for a strange ritual: The Washington Inquisition. Officially, it was called an "oversight hearing. " In fact, it was a bit of scripted political theater. The Republicans called the hearing to pressure Reno to appoint an independent counsel to investigate campaign-finance abuses. But they knew she wouldn't budge, and she didn't. Reno sat alone at the witness table, dressed in regal purple, thick legal books spread before her. She repeated her mantra: She hasn't seen evidence of a crime yet to require such an appointment.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | By David Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congress has been experimenting with the Internet and with telephone conferencing for years. But yesterday, the Internet and video conferencing were combined to produce what was billed as the first "virtual" Capitol Hill hearing. The occasion was an otherwise unexceptional hearing on reforming the Internal Revenue Service. But this time, witnesses in St. Louis and Salt Lake City appeared via video in a Senate hearing room. The public could also participate by asking questions through a "chat room" on the Internet.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | By Alexis Moore
There's a principle at stake in the Lani Guinier affair that transcends the ideological battle over how this country enforces its civil rights laws. It's the grand American tradition of fair play. Since when in America has it been standard operating procedure to let vocal opposition deprive a nominee the chance to be heard? Since when does the comfort level of a certain select group of politicians determine a person's integrity? Yet that's what the President seems to be saying as he vacillates over whether to withdraw the nomination before she even has a chance to explain her views to the Senate.
SPORTS
December 3, 1992 | By John Nolan, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Timothy Dwyer contributed to this article
As more people came forward to say Marge Schott had made racist remarks, a U.S. senator said yesterday that the Cincinnati Reds' owner would be a topic of discussion next week at a Senate hearing on baseball. Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum (D., Ohio) said he was appalled by remarks attributed to Schott, which are being investigated by a committee appointed by baseball's ruling executive council. "Hitler was good in the beginning, but he went too far," Schott was quoted as saying in a New York Times article Sunday.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | By Lenny Savino, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Top film studio executives skipped a Senate grilling yesterday on their reported practice of marketing films with R ratings to underage viewers. "By some uncanny coincidence, every single studio executive was either out of the country or unavailable," said Commerce committee chairman John McCain (R., Ariz.). "I can only conclude the industry is too ashamed of, or unable to defend, their marketing practices. " Video-game and music-industry executives summoned to answer the same questions showed up at the hearing, at which Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, the Democratic vice presidential nominee, and Lynne Cheney, wife of his Republican counterpart, Dick Cheney, also testified.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Twisted Sister, performing tomorrow night at the Spectrum, is best known to the non-heavy-metal audience as one of the prime targets of the Parents Music Resource Center's anti-rock campaign. The band's lead singer, Dee Snider, was one of three pop stars (Frank Zappa and John Denver were the others) who testified before a Sept. 19 Senate hearing in defense of rock music. There, Snider was calm and articulate; in concert, he provides the sort of addled froth and naughtiness that his fans seem to find peerlessly witty.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - A former U.S. Justice Department official warned at a Senate hearing here Wednesday that the $45.2 billion merger of Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc. would lead to a dangerously large corporation with "massive tentacles" in the pay-TV and Internet industries. Comcast executive David Cohen, who was testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, countered that "consumers will be big winners in this transaction. " A three-hour, sometimes tense hearing revealed deep skepticism among Democratic senators about the proposed merger of the nation's largest and second-largest cable-TV operators.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Despite a few questions about her role in the firing of a prosecutor, Gov. Christie's former attorney general, Paula Dow, cruised through her judicial confirmation Thursday in the New Jersey Senate. Dow, who said she recently moved from Essex County to Willingboro, will serve on Superior Court in Burlington County. The Senate voted to confirm her by 38-0 with two abstentions. Dow originally was nominated by Christie to serve in Essex County, but an apparent dispute between Christie and senators there held up her hearing.
NEWS
June 18, 1995
There is the temptation, having watched the grim, self-righteous testimony of the commandants of America's scattered, 100,000-strong militia movement, to dismiss them as stone fools, blowhards and big boys playing dress-up. The raw material certainly was there: Michigan gun shop owner Norman Olson in his frown and fatigues with the rolled-up sleeves; former toy-company owner Robert Fletcher, now of rural Montana, rambling on about how the U.S. government's weather-altering tornado technology could be used to kill "a million Americans.
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NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
LANCASTER - Witnesses at a state Senate committee hearing Monday called for a dramatic strengthening of DUI laws, saying current statutes are too weak to stop repeat offenders who endanger everyone. Patrick Crowley, whose 24-year-old son Liam was killed last year by a man prosecutors called the worst drunk driver in Chester County, testified that people are dying because of Pennsylvania's lax laws. "We watched our son, Liam, die," Crowley said, reading a statement written by Liam's mother.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - A Dish Network Corp. executive told lawmakers Wednesday that Comcast Corp.'s deal for Time Warner Cable Inc. should be flatly rejected because the combined cable-TV giant would serve half of the residential Internet customers in America and could thwart new streaming companies that compete with traditional TV. The Comcast/Time Warner Cable deal and a related proposed merger of AT&T Inc. and DirecTV "will determine whether a few large...
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - A former U.S. Justice Department official warned at a Senate hearing here Wednesday that the $45.2 billion merger of Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc. would lead to a dangerously large corporation with "massive tentacles" in the pay-TV and Internet industries. Comcast executive David Cohen, who was testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, countered that "consumers will be big winners in this transaction. " A three-hour, sometimes tense hearing revealed deep skepticism among Democratic senators about the proposed merger of the nation's largest and second-largest cable-TV operators.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold the first public hearing on Comcast Corp.'s proposed $45.2 billion deal for Time Warner Cable Inc. on Wednesday, amid regulatory and financial concerns about merging the No. 1 and No. 2 cable-TV companies. The hearing likely will be a forum for a word most people - cable customers or not - will find unfamiliar: monopsony . It is a market condition in which there is only one big buyer for services or goods. In the context of a combined Comcast and Time Warner Cable, it describes how the giant cable-TV company would be the major purchaser of Hollywood entertainment because of its tens of millions of cable-TV subscribers, and thus could dictate economic terms to the programmers.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG Doctors and the broader public may be split on the prospect of legalizing medical marijuana in Pennsylvania. But the mothers who lined up at a Senate hearing Tuesday to testify about their children's severe chronic illnesses and a lack of treatment were not. Christine Brann's 3-year-old son, Garrett, has Dravet syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy. She said that doctors had tried 10 medications to control his seizures, but none worked. "Medical marijuana is the only course of treatment we have left," said Brann, of Hummelstown, Dauphin County.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia family of five lived without a working toilet for a month after the landlord refused to fix it. When the family withheld the rent - which is legal - the landlord locked them out. Because they didn't have an attorney, the family was never able to get back into the apartment. That was one of dozens of stories conveyed at a Pennsylvania Senate Judiciary Committee public hearing at the Philadelphia Bar Association in Center City on Thursday on the importance of civil legal help for the poor.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Top Pentagon leaders said for the first time Thursday that the Defense Department backed the idea of providing arms to opposition groups in Syria. Until Thursday, the Pentagon had only said publicly that U.S. policy is to give only humanitarian assistance to rebels battling President Bashar al-Assad's regime. Providing arms has been the subject of internal administration debate. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said President Obama made the final decision against arming the rebels.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Despite a few questions about her role in the firing of a prosecutor, Gov. Christie's former attorney general, Paula Dow, cruised through her judicial confirmation Thursday in the New Jersey Senate. Dow, who said she recently moved from Essex County to Willingboro, will serve on Superior Court in Burlington County. The Senate voted to confirm her by 38-0 with two abstentions. Dow originally was nominated by Christie to serve in Essex County, but an apparent dispute between Christie and senators there held up her hearing.
NEWS
May 14, 2012
Senate hearing set on scandal WASHINGTON - The chairman of the Senate committee with jurisdiction over homeland security says he has scheduled a hearing for May 23 to review the Secret Service investigation of the Colombia prostitution scandal. Sen. Joe Lieberman told CNN's State of the Union that he believes the agency has done a thorough job in investigating the incident. But the Connecticut independent said he also wants to know whether there were warning signs about agents' behavior.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Library officials, researchers, and fishermen were among those who went to Burlington County College on Wednesday to tell a Senate panel what they thought of Gov. Christie's proposed state budget. Christie's $32.1 billion spending plan provides many with more money than they received last year. But organizations are still reeling from deep cuts in Christie's previous budgets, and his plan for fiscal 2013 won't alleviate that. Libraries have closed, state psychiatric hospitals are crowded, and poor people can't get lawyers even if they qualify for free help, advocates said.
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