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NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday narrowly approved Gov. Christie's nomination of Robert Barr to serve on the Pinelands Commission. Barr, secretary of the Cape May County Democratic Committee, has been opposed by most state conservation and environmental organizations, which see him as a likely yes vote if South Jersey Gas seeks another waiver to build a controversial pipeline through the protected Pinelands. Jaclyn Rhoades, assistant director of the advocacy group Pinelands Preservation Alliance, said it appeared the vote on Barr's nomination was scheduled for Tuesday because Sen. Raymond Lesniak (D., Union)
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams hinted at a potential bid for U.S. Senate next year, as his party seeks a nominee to take on the incumbent, Republican Pat Toomey. "Anytime people talk about that, it's something you have to consider," Williams said Thursday in a telephone interview. He stressed that he is focused on his current job, but said being a senator might give him more chances to make an impact statewide. Supporting early childhood education or after-school programs, he said, "would really do a great job with helping us prevent crime.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - When he started working on defense issues, Ashton Carter said Wednesday, there was just one big worry: the Cold War and its threat of nuclear disaster. "Those were the good old days," said Sen. James M. Inhofe (R., Okla.). Now, as Carter stands poised to become the civilian head of the U.S. military, the Abington High School graduate faces a much more complex tangle. "We are in a time where the number and severity of risks is not something I've seen before in my life," Carter said during the first hearing on his nomination to become secretary of defense.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - At Gov. Wolf's inaugural last month, new House Majority Leader Dave Reed was among those seated in the A-list section outside the Capitol. After the ceremony, a state official turned to Reed, looking for a program. Reed told him he did not know where there was an extra one. The official, whom Reed declined to name, responded by saying, "If you want your boss, the governor, to be successful, you'd better know where the programs are. " Without missing a beat, Reed replied, "My apologies, sir. " It happens that way for Reed - a lot. At 36, he more closely resembles the star athlete who just got named president of his college fraternity than a six-term lawmaker just elected leader of the Republican House majority in the nation's sixth most populous state.
NEWS
January 14, 2015
THE NEW state House majority leader, one of the most powerful posts in Harrisburg, isn't exactly a carbon copy of leaders in Pennsylvania. In fact, Dave Reed, of rural Indiana County, "Christmas Tree Capital of the World," seems an odd fit for leadership in a legislature known for sameness. He was sworn in last week. He's far from the same ol', same ol'. He's in the party of old men but, at 36, is the youngest GOP legislative leader in the state's modern history. He started life in a trailer park, but holds an Ivy League master's degree from Penn's Fels Institute of Government.
SPORTS
January 8, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
After being away from the Wells Fargo Center for 19 days, the Flyers returned home Tuesday night and ended their five-game losing streak in dramatic fashion. Wayne Simmonds scored the game-winner in the fifth round of the shootout as the Flyers outlasted Ottawa, 2-1, at the Wells Fargo Center. Goalie Steve Mason was brilliant in the shootout (four stops on five shots) and the 65 minutes as the Flyers snapped a 10-game, two-year losing streak in shootouts. They had been 0-5 in shootouts this season, and are now 28-56 since the breakaway competition started in 2005-06.
SPORTS
January 7, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
TUNE INTO any baseball telecast, especially in the bottom of the ninth with the game on the line, and you're likely to see a particular hitter's career numbers against that pitcher flash on the screen. In hockey, you're only likely to see a goaltender's career record against a certain opponent. Individual matchups are often lost in hockey. "Well, at least I know a lot of coaches pay attention to that type of stuff," Flyers netminder Ray Emery said, laughing. The game-inside-the-game tonight will be Senators forward Clarke MacArthur going up against Flyers goaltender Steve Mason.
NEWS
December 18, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - An unusual thing happened in Congress this month: The Senate and the House each passed legislation likely to create a law, with massive bipartisan support. Sen. Robert P. Casey (D., Pa.), a sponsor of the bill, wound up on the same side as House Speaker John Boehner, the top Republican in Congress. The beneficiaries of this cooperation: families facing the lifelong costs of disabling illnesses such as epilepsy or Down syndrome. If President Obama signs the bill, people with disabilities and their families would soon have the option of creating tax-sheltered savings accounts to help pay for long-term care.
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The debate over U.S. military action against the Islamic State, pushed to the background for some time, came to the forefront again Thursday in one of New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez's last hearings chairing the Foreign Relations Committee. Sen. Rand Paul (R., Ky.) forced the issue by trying to advance a plan imposing limits on the ongoing fight in Syria and Iraq, prompting a tense debate that crossed party lines. The fight put Menendez, a Democrat, in charge of a weighty international debate for one of the last times before Republicans take the Senate majority in January and he gives up his gavel.
NEWS
December 2, 2014
LET'S TAKE a moment to think about what lies ahead if the Legislature decides to hold a voting session in early January. You heard about this, right? Emboldened by picking up stronger Republican majorities in the House and Senate, some GOPers are considering exercising those majorities to, you know, get what they want and stick it to the incoming Democratic governor. Hey, that's what people with power do. It's misnamed a "lame-duck" session. But newly elected and re-elected lawmakers get sworn in Jan. 6; the only lame anything is Gov. Corbett.
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