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Sensitivity

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NEWS
March 11, 1987
I would first like to commend Donald C. Drake for his informative, if disturbing, Inquirer Magazine essay, "The mystery of teenage suicide" (Feb. 22). I was particularly troubled to learn of the phenomenon of suicide clusters, and of the fact that media coverage of the problem can actually trigger suicides. Given the expressed concern over this last issue both in Mr. Drake's essay and in the editor's preface, I am somewhat surprised at the choice of wording in various places in the essay.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
After a long and much-acclaimed run on Broadway, Robert Anderson's Tea and Sympathy was ripe for a screen version. But it was 1956, and Anderson and director Vincente Minnelli had a problem: the Production Code. One of its sillier clauses insisted that "sex perversion or any inference of it is forbidden. " Even though Anderson's work is about a sensitive boy at a prep school who is merely suspected by his classmates of being homosexual, the code presented a problem. Anderson did the adaptation himself and managed - with discretion, tact and perhaps too much taste - to negotiate the difficulties.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2002 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel yesterday, those involved in Convention Center negotiations continued talks to improve customer satisfaction and resolve work issues. Five blocks away, jammed into a hot meeting room at the Convention Center, 120 union carpenters in a sensitivity and productivity class talked over the same issues. And here's how they played out for one union carpenter who raised his hand and described a real-life experience that shows how the relationship between exhibitor and union worker can go awry.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
IRECENTLY lost an old high school friend who was murdered last month in New Jersey - she was a transgender woman and a wonderful person. Perhaps this is why I responded so strongly to your poor coverage of the recent murder in Point Breeze. I've never before seen a murder victim so explicitly sexualized - her full name was left out of the story (and misspelled), and the frame of the story strongly suggested that she was a prostitute without any verifiable evidence. As a reader, I learned nothing about this victim except that she had a "better body" than at least one of her neighbors and frequently garnered male attention.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Police Department, long a target of criticism for its relationship with the city's minority populations, has begun training officers assigned to its Civil Affairs Bureau on how to interact better with various ethnic groups. The training, offered at the Police Academy, is being conducted by Herman Wrice, who is on the social-sciences staff of the Busch Center at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker said he contacted Wrice because of Wrice's national reputation as an educator and expert in such training.
NEWS
August 23, 2010 | By Charles Krauthammer
It's hard to be an Obama sycophant these days. Your hero delivers a Ramadan speech roundly supporting the building of a mosque and Islamic center near ground zero in New York. Your heart swells, and you're moved to declare this President Obama's finest hour, his act of greatest courage. Alas, the next day, at a remove of 800 miles, Obama explains that he was only talking about the legality of the thing and not the wisdom - upon which he does not make, and will not make, any judgment.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
About midway through "Breaking the Rules," you will be aghast to find yourself wishing the main character would hurry up and die of leukemia. This sounds crass, but it really isn't. It's a sensible reaction to the shameless way the people who made this shallow movie have exploited the death throes of a cancer victim. Jason Bateman stars as a young man stricken with the disease. He invites two warring friends (Jonathan Silverman, C. Thomas Howell) on a cross-country jaunt, Cleveland to L.A., a last lark during the few weeks he has left.
NEWS
September 3, 1993 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They were a talkative crowd, those casually dressed grade-school teachers who got together yesterday for the first time since school let out in June. They had been summoned for an in-service seminar. But it wasn't a routine presentation, the type that teachers endure while organizing their lesson plans. Instead, the staff was warned that they might be made uncomfortable, even embarrassed, by some of the things they would hear. This was, after all, the first districtwide cultural diversity and sensitivity training seminar held since perhaps the 1960s.
NEWS
July 6, 2010
WHAT a shortage of sensitivity the Daily News showed on June 16. A fine state trooper, family man and friend, Officer John Quigg, was killed while driving impaired the wrong way. What prompted me to write is your lack of sensitivity. I'm talking about the photo on the front page of your June 17 issue: a state police patch, a set of keys and a glass of booze. This man had an illness and he was seeking treatment. If someone who has a heart condition and is taking medicine and he loses consciousness and has an accident, would you print a photo with a set of keys, a bottle of medicine and a burst, bloody heart?
NEWS
May 20, 1991
FAILING IN OUR LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS Sustaining our global leadership and preserving the health of our economy will require more Americans who are more knowledgeable about internal conditions, more skilled in foreign languages, more familiar with foreign markets and business practices and more capable of functioning abroad with professional skill and cultural sensitivity. In my work in Tokyo, I observe trade barriers. But the linguistic barrier is, in many respects, the most formidale obstacle to a smoother economic relationship.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: I was a well-behaved, respectful child/teen/adult whose mother snooped and took things out of context. So I rebelled where I knew it would hurt. As I look ahead to when my children are teens and adults, I want to be respectful and informed. I want to be the parent they turn to, trusted and sensitive and firm. I'd love to hear your advice on privacy, snooping, and boundaries to keep in my mental filing cabinet.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Hours after being sworn in, Mayor Kenney responded to public outrage over the latest Mummers Parade: He tasked the Human Relations Commission and his administration's top LGBT aide to enact major changes in the city-backed New Year's spectacle. Strict rules, prescreening of acts, sanctions, and sensitivity training for the Mummers all are under consideration in response to some Comics strutting in brownface and dressing as tacos. Others carried racially inflammatory signs. And still others performed a skit about Caitlyn Jenner that was deemed offensive to the LGBT community.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams did little to assuage his critics Monday when he announced that three prosecutors ensnared in a pornographic email chain had finally received sensitivity training. "It's a slap in the face," said City Councilwoman Cindy Bass, who, with eight colleagues, has called for the firing of the prosecutors. "It only happened because we called for their resignation and firing. " The prosecutors - Frank Fina, Marc Costanzo, and Patrick Blessington - completed the training Friday, according to a release from the District Attorney's Office that said Williams and 11 other employees took the training as well.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Syrian native who also held British citizenship was arraigned Friday in U.S. District Court in Scranton on charges of conspiring with a Pennsylvania man to illegally export to Syria laboratory equipment that could be used to create chemical weapons. Ahmad Feras Diri, 42, pleaded not guilty Friday to a host of charges. Diri recently lost an extradition fight in London, and afterward surrendered to agents from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations and the U.S. Commerce Department's Office of Export Enforcement.
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
WELCOME BACK, dear reader, to the land of pornographic emails, fiery vendettas and endless grand jury investigations known as Pennsylvania politics! It's possible you haven't tuned in since last week, when the commonwealth was left stunned by the release of hundreds of graphic sexual images that were contained in emails sent and received by former state prosecutors - including, most prominently, Frank Fina, noted arch-nemesis of recently indicted state Attorney General Kathleen Kane.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Update: Temple University said Friday that Xiaoxing Xi has been temporarily suspended as chair of Temple University's physics department, pending the outcome of federal charges that he schemed to provide sensitive U.S. defense technology to China. "The concern is this certainly will affect his ability to do administrative duties," Temple Provost Hai-Lung Dai said. No decision has been made on whether he will be permitted to teach in the fall if the case has not been resolved, Dai said.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
If there's one thing the people at Montgomery Theater love, it's a cluttered urban apartment filled with two or three of the city's ragged loveless. Jim Geoghan's Light Sensitive fills this bill, and, like many of the theater's other productions, it's a story with working-class humor, heart, and a warm Christmas message. So, good for them. It's not all they do, but they have their niche and they fill it well. The twist in Geoghan's tale comes in the form of Tom (Jared Michael Delaney)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
  Zymir has his heart set on becoming a fashion designer and developing his own brand of "Z" jeans. In fact, he already has made a sketch of them. That's quite ambitious for an 11-year-old, even one as stylish and creative as Zymir. During a recent visit to Philadelphia University's fashion design department, he watched several garments being made and learned the process start to finish. He also got some tips from designer Jay McCarroll, winner of the debut Project Runway competition in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chris Rock established himself as one of our foremost comics with his 1996 HBO special, Bring the Pain . Nearly two decades later, he proves he's also a brilliant filmmaker with Top Five , a stunning, joyous, big-screen comedy written and directed by and starring the 49-year-old Rock. An innovative take on familiar material, Top Five is an exquisitely paced, rich, idiosyncratic, satirical, yet deeply moving free-form comedy about a Hollywood star who is shadowed for one day by a New York Times reporter.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Getting a prostate exam is generally not high on any man's list of favorite pastimes, but just imagine what it would be like to administer one. Actually you don't have to imagine - if you know the right people at Drexel University College of Medicine. That is the home of Patrick, a simulated patient who is part image on a video screen, and . . . well, there is no elegant way to say this: part plastic butt. The inside of the synthetic posterior is equipped with 12 pressure sensors so medical students can practice their technique.
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