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SPORTS
October 2, 1988 | Inquirer photos by Jerry Lodriguss
At this 24th Olympiad, there has been no shortage of records - men and women swimming faster, jumping higher, running more rapidly. But after these marks have been broken, what will remain from the 16 days in Seoul, what always lingers from these international sporting spectacles, are recollections of the emotion they can elicit. And that is perhaps not so surprising, when you consider that four years of backbreaking training can be compressed into a single leap skyward, a momentary slip or stumble, an arbitrary ruling by an impassive referee.
SPORTS
September 16, 1988 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
At 2:22 p.m. today in Seoul, 22 minutes after midnight in Philadelphia, an Olympic Torch relay runner entered the city limits and began making his way toward City Hall for a 7 p.m. ceremony (5 a.m. in Philadelphia). The torch was to wind its way through streets that often are crowded and hazy with smog, but have been rendered litter-free. Armies of jump suit-clad workers have been sweeping gutters, some using tweezers to remove the tiniest, most obstinate bits of debris. As the torch completed the final leg of its journey - accompanied by the ever-present national police and an anti-government demonstration in which at least 33 officers and 15 students were reported hurt - athletes and officials from 21 nations were scheduled to maneuver through the stringent security at Kimpo International Airport today and take their places in the Olympic Village.
SPORTS
September 28, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Rich Schutz's distant dream of winning an Olympic medal in weightlifting took a tragic turn on his second day in Seoul. He learned that his mother had died of leukemia. He caught the first flight home and attended her funeral. For a lesser competitor, the Olympic quest might have ended. Schutz refused to let that happen, and yesterday he was back in Seoul under the bright lights, competing and trying to keep the sadness and loss out of his mind. "It's been a real roller coaster ride," said the quiet, 23-year-old health club instructor.
SPORTS
September 17, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Seoul is a warm place filled with warm-hearted people, unlike those in Inchon who made it warm for the Olympic torch runners by hurling Molotov cocktails in their path. "They can't do enough for you," U.S. women's basketball coach Kay Yow said of the Seoul residents. And not just in the Olympic Village. On the subway, people give up their seats for foreigners. In the back streets, where tourists seldom venture unless they are lost, they come up to you and offer to help you find your way. They don't just point the way, either.
NEWS
September 16, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Three top South Korean officials yesterday accused North Korea of causing Sunday's "barbarous" airport explosion, an accusation that North Korea denied today. Five South Koreans were killed and more than 30 injured when the bomb exploded Sunday in a trash can outside a terminal at Kimpo International Airport. The terminal was packed with foreign athletes arriving for the 10th Asian Games, a major track-and-field event that opens here this week. "There is no doubt that the bombing was a barbarous anti-national act of either North Korean agents or subversive leftists instigated by them," said a government statement signed by the ministers of defense, justice and home affairs.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | BY FRANCESCA CHAPMAN Daily News wire services, the New York Post, Washington Post and USA Today contributed to this report
We're getting a mixed message from the latest leg of Michael Jackson's "HIStory" tour, in which the performer plans a concert tonight in Seoul, South Korea. The usual hundreds of fans are staking out the singer's hotel, shrieking "We love you, Michael," from the street. But thousands of Seoul residents are protesting the singer's presence, mostly by hammering the United States Embassy with angry phone calls, leters and faxes. (Callers were told the State Department had nothing to do with the HIStory tour, thanks very much.
NEWS
June 12, 1987
Like Nero, South Korean President Chun Doo Hwan was fiddling when his capital, Seoul, began to burn. Mr. Chun was celebrating the choice of his hand-picked successor, Roh Tae Woo, at a gala reception when the most violent demonstrations in years broke out across downtown Seoul. The demonstrators, mainly students, were protesting the anointing of Mr. Roh, as well as the torture death of a student by police last January. Mr. Roh has become a symbol of Korean democracy stillborn. The authoritarian Mr. Chun, who seized power violently in a military coup in 1980, has pledged to step down voluntarily next February after seven years in power.
SPORTS
August 24, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
An actress dressed as a high priestess of ancient Greece yesterday lit the Olympic flame that is scheduled to travel 6,950 miles to Seoul, South Korea, for the Summer Games. Katerina Didaskalou, dressed in a white robe, solemnly knelt on one knee as she held a torch to a concave mirror that focused the sun's rays and ignited the flame. The flame-lighting ceremony, attended by about 15,000 people, was held at the sanctuary of the god Zeus at the site of ancient Olympia, some 112 miles southwest of Athens.
SPORTS
April 17, 1988 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a mix of pride, hope and anxiety, Evelyn Lewis probably will go to the Olympics this year, once more to cheer for her son and daughter. There remains the matter of qualifying competition, of course, but barring the unexpected, the mother of Carl and Carol Lewis firmly expects to relive the emotional ordeal she knew in the Los Angeles Games of 1984. Carl's 1984 victories - in the 100 and 200 meters, the long jump and the 400-meter relay - made him the Summer Olympics' first quadruple gold medalist since Jesse Owens in 1936.
NEWS
December 14, 2003 | By Regina Roadfuss FOR THE INQUIRER
I arrived in Seoul, South Korea, at the end of August 2002. I landed a job teaching English to children in one of Seoul's many language schools. This was my first time away from home. The city proved to be everything the tourist guidebooks said it would be: a very modern town that blends Korean culture and tradition with today's technology. Although it was awkward at first, I soon became used to Seoul's busy atmosphere. Soon after my arrival, the headlines from back home exploded with worries over North Korea's production of nuclear weapons.
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NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
PARK CITY, Utah - Growing up in Huntingdon Valley in the 1980s, Benson Lee loved the teen comedies of that spirited time, especially John Hughes classics like The Breakfast Club and Sixteen Candles . The music, the style, the "youthful attitude" - those films were, he says, "such a great escape for me. " There was just one problem. Lee, a second-generation Korean American, "hated the depiction of Asian characters," like Sixteen Candles' Long Duk Dong, a buffoonish exchange student whose appearances were introduced with ringing gongs.
NEWS
October 17, 2014
THE TRUCK: Impossible to miss. David Song's Korean-American fusion food truck is basically a rolling mural with stars and stripes, a red-and-blue taegeuk, the Liberty Bell, a ferocious white tiger and the Philadelphia skyline, among other things. Hungry or not, you kind of want to check it out anyway. WHAT TO EAT: The Cheese Steak Korean ($9) caught our attention immediately. We will eat any variation of this sandwich - breakfast, lunch, dinner, midnight snack, whatever. Song's has thinly sliced Korean marinated beef, Cheez Whiz, sauteed kimchi and onions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Patrick, who grew up in West Chester, had been living and teaching English in Korea for just two months when he posted his profile on a website for English speakers. That's where he met Erica. She grew up in Busan, Korea, studied hospitality at the University of Delaware, and interned and worked at hotels in South Carolina for two years before moving to Seoul, where she worked as a project manager for Rosetta Stone. They were amazed that Erica, now 29, was at Delaware when Patrick lived less than an hour away in West Chester, and that she was in South Carolina when he was studying history at the University of South Carolina.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Antigay bill gains in Russia MOSCOW - A bill that stigmatizes gay people and bans giving children any information about homosexuality won overwhelming approval Tuesday in Russia's lower house of parliament. Hours before the State Duma passed the Kremlin-backed law in a 436-0 vote with one abstention, more than two dozen protesters were attacked by hundreds of antigay activists and then detained by police. The bill banning the "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations" still needs to be passed by the appointed upper house and signed into law by President Vladimir V. Putin, but neither step is in doubt.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Sam Kim, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - North and South Korea on Thursday agreed to hold talks on reopening a jointly run factory complex and other cross-border issues, after months of deteriorating relations and a day before a U.S.-China summit in which the North is expected to be a key topic. The envisioned talks, welcomed by Washington, could help rebuild avenues of inter-Korean cooperation that were obliterated in recent years amid hard-line stances by both countries, though the key issue isolating the North from the world community - its nuclear program - is not up for debate.
NEWS
April 27, 2013 | By Chico Harlan, Washington Post
SEOUL - After North Korea on Friday rejected formal talks to resolve a standoff at a jointly operated border industrial complex, South Korea said it would call home its remaining workers from the facility, formally severing the last major connection between the two countries. South Korea's decision diminishes the already slim odds of the complex's survival and widens a divide between Seoul and Pyongyang that has grown during weeks of back-and-forth threats. The Kaesong Industrial Complex had stood as the chief symbol of cooperation between the neighbors after opening in 2004 as a capitalist bubble on the northern side of the border where South Korean companies employed cheap North Korean labor.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Ben Feller and Anne Gearan, Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - President Obama intends to open his pitch for faster work to lock down nuclear material that could be used by terrorists with an up-close look at the nuclear front lines along the heavily militarized border with volatile North Korea. Obama arrived in Seoul on Sunday morning for three days of diplomacy. In the midst of an election year focused on economic concerns at home, Obama has designed a rare Asia visit that features time in just one country. He'll use much of the time to keep pressure on North Korea to back off a planned rocket launch and return to disarmament talks.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL, South Korea - Everywhere she goes, whether it's work or the corner market, Lee Kyung Ok is on the lookout to make new friends. When the magic happens, she whips out her smartphone to exchange digits. She's aggressive, hyper-confident in her navigation of her hipster device. She's also 63. Lee is among the rapidly growing ranks of older South Korean technology users, veteran consumers who feel compelled to keep pace with younger residents of this restless society. While some her age might become analogue shadows of an increasingly high-tech world, the Seoul office worker embraces the challenge.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
The obits for North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il are filled with details about his weird personal habits and his country's nukes, but the history books will reveal him as one of the great mass murderers of our times. One of my most chilling journalistic experiences came in 2004 in South Korea, when I was interviewing a handful of North Koreans who had managed to escape to Seoul, and listening to the horrors they'd endured in their home country. Only a few thousand North Koreans have made it out, and they bear witness to the terrible suffering that Kim and his father, Kim Il Sung, inflicted on the North Korean population.
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