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NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
In another era, SEPTA's proposal to build a power plant in an industrial complex near its Wayne Junction station might have attracted little attention. SEPTA says the project, which would power most of the transit agency's northern Regional Rail system, will keep its trains running in case of a Peco blackout. It also says the $26.8 million plant will save money, and require no outlay for the cash-strapped agency. But SEPTA's proposed power plant would be fueled by natural gas, which despite its clean-burning attributes has become a lightning rod for anti-fossil-fuel activists.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
As I stood in line waiting for my train home for more than an hour Tuesday night, I debated whether the SEPTA union president had lost his mind, or whether I should get a job driving a bus. As the time passed and the guy behind me kept sneezing, I got more and more agitated at Willie Brown, the SEPTA union head who walked away from the bargaining table in the middle of the night, leaving thousands of riders in the lurch. Calling a strike without warning at 3 a.m. was dirty pool.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
By Vukan R. Vuchic SEPTA is going ahead with a major change to its Regional Rail service's line designations. It claims the change is necessary because some passengers mistakenly take a line such as the R5 toward Doylestown when they mean to take the R5 toward Bryn Mawr, in the opposite direction from Center City. However, instead of improving passenger information with better signs and clearer indications of train direction, the agency is eliminating all the "R" designations. Instead, it's naming each line after one of 20 suburban stations where it terminates, such as Lansdale or Doylestown.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Asbury, N.J.-based builders J.G. Petrucci Co. plan to officially start work Wednesday on an eight-building, 151-unit apartment complex across the street from SEPTA's Warminster regional rail station. The development, to be called Jacksonville Station, is expected to open in Spring 2017, the company said in a release. J.G. Petrucci also built the nearby Station at Bucks County residential complex, a 257-unit project that opened in 2012. jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
In another era, SEPTA's proposal to build a power plant in an industrial complex near its Wayne Junction station might have attracted little attention. SEPTA says the project, which would power most of the transit agency's northern Regional Rail system, will keep its trains running in case of a Peco blackout. It also says the $26.8 million plant will save money, and require no outlay for the cash-strapped agency. But SEPTA's proposed power plant would be fueled by natural gas, which despite its clean-burning attributes has become a lightning rod for anti-fossil-fuel activists.
NEWS
June 16, 2016
A 76-year-old woman who was struck by a SEPTA bus in the city's Chestnut Hill section Thursday has died, police said Tuesday. Police identified the woman as Elizabeth O'Malley, 76, of the 800 block of East Horton Street in West Philadelphia. She died at 5:05 p.m. Saturday at Einstein Medical Center, police said. It was about 4:20 p.m. Thursday when the Route L bus traveling south on Germantown Avenue made a left onto Gravers Lane and hit O'Malley and a 50-year-old woman, who were walking in a crosswalk.
NEWS
June 15, 2016
SEPTA's new fare card went on sale Monday morning. SEPTA Key, the electronic fare card that will eventually replace passes and tokens on the region's public transportation network, is being made available to 10,000 people on a first-come, first-served basis. Cash, tokens, and - for the first time on SEPTA's system - credit cards can be used on kiosks to buy the new cards. These kiosks are in six stops on the Market Frankford Line and six stops on the Broad Street Line. Once you have the card, though, you can "reload" it like an E-ZPass - setting up an account online, or over the phone, and adding to it as needed.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
For those who were among the first to buy SEPTA's new smart fare card Monday morning, the sheer novelty was a big part of the draw. "I just wanted to get a daily [pass] to see what it was like," said Dennis Grimes, of Philadelphia, who passed through Dilworth Plaza Station on his way to work at a Center City health-care company. At 6 a.m., when SEPTA's yellow-vested ambassadors arrived at the two silver kiosks in the station to help customers with the new SEPTA Key fare system, people were already waiting.
NEWS
June 11, 2016
Two women were hospitalized after they were hit by a SEPTA bus Thursday afternoon in the city's Chestnut Hill section, an agency spokesman said. The Route L bus was traveling on Germantown Avenue at Gravers Lane when it hit the women about 4:20 p.m., said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. The women were transported to Einstein Medical Center. Their injuries did not appear to be life-threatening, Busch said. The cause of the accident was under investigation. - Robert Moran
BUSINESS
June 11, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
The fare system of Philadelphia's future arrives Monday. SEPTA Key, the electronic fare card that will eventually replace passes and tokens on the region's public transportation network, is being made available to 10,000 people - first come, first served - in the coming weeks. SEPTA officials are keen to demonstrate the system's capabilities, and a brief presentation Thursday showed how cash, tokens, and - for the first time on SEPTA's system - credit cards can be used on kiosks to buy the new cards.
NEWS
June 7, 2016
Service was restored Sunday afternoon at SEPTA's Norristown Transportation Center two hours after it was shut down about 1:30 p.m. at the request of Norristown Police after a suspicious package was discovered at the adjacent Bieber Tourways bus depot. At 3:45 p.m., a SEPTA spokesperson said the Norristown High Speed Line, the Manayunk/Norristown Regional Rail Line and bus service had resumed. "It ended up being nothing," said a Norristown Police spokesman. "The bomb squad cleared it. " SEPTA had stopped servicing the Norristown Transportation Center after receiving word from Norristown police that an unattended package was being investigated.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
A van crashed into a utility pole at North 9th Street and Roosevelt Boulevard early Friday, briefly knocking out power to 1,300 PECO customers, including SEPTA's Broad Street Line. No injuries were reported in the crash at about 4:30 a.m. in an area bound by the Logan, Olney and Hunting Park sections of the city. Benjamin Armstrong, a PECO spokesman, said power was restored about a half-hour later. SEPTA, however, was not able to fully restore service on the Broad Street and Ridge Spur Lines until about 5:45 a.m. - Joseph A. Gambardello
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
The runner who was critically injured by a hit-and-run driver in Holmesburg a week ago was a SEPTA Transit police officer for whom runners plan a four-mile "get well" outing Sunday. Officer Gary Miller, 44, was running on Rowland Avenue, near Chippendale Street, about 3 p.m. last Sunday when a dark-colored sedan struck him from behind, throwing him up against the windshield before he landed on the road. SEPTA Police Chief Thomas Nestel III said Saturday that Miller, who has been a transit officer for about 13 years, was in serious condition in the intensive-care unit at the Aria Health-Torresdale Campus.
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