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NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WHEN JASON Walters first met Winchester, the German shepherd was a 120-pound ball of energy so big and high-strung that his overwhelmed owners had given him up to a shelter. He was exactly what Walters, a SEPTA police officer, wanted. "High-strung, for us, is a positive," said Walters, who helped transform Winchester into a working police dog (now a svelte 95 pounds from rigorous training). "Training these dogs is like playtime for them - their work is hide-and-seek. " Their partnership has proven so successful that Walters has created a charity, the Throw Away Dogs Project, that aims to train unwanted shelter dogs to be working police dogs.
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A TENTATIVE DEAL has been reached between SEPTA and one of the Regional Rail unions with which it's been locked in a long labor dispute, officials said yesterday. Representatives from the transit authority and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers agreed yesterday to the terms of a new labor contract, said Arthur Davidson, the general chairman of the union's System Council No. 7. With the contract approved by union leadership, the next step is for it to be ratified by IBEW's 220 members, who will be voting for the next two weeks on the matter, Davidson said.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move to ease the threat of a commuter rail strike, SEPTA's board on Monday delegated its authority to approve new labor contracts to board Chairman Pasquale T. "Pat" Deon Sr. Deon was authorized to sign a new pact with Regional Rail electrical workers if the 215 workers ratify the contract in balloting that is now underway. That would allow the workers to get their raises before the next scheduled SEPTA board meeting at the end of September. No deal has been reached with Regional Rail locomotive engineers, however, so the possibility of a commuter rail strike remains.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move to ease the threat of a commuter rail strike, SEPTA's board on Monday delegated its authority to approve new labor contracts to board Chairman Pasquale T. "Pat" Deon Sr. Deon was authorized to sign a new pact with Regional Rail electrical workers if the 215 workers ratify the contract in balloting that is now underway. That would allow the workers to get their raises before the next scheduled SEPTA board meeting at the end of September. No deal has been reached with Regional Rail locomotive engineers, however, so the possibility of a commuter rail strike remains.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
As SEPTA prepares to settle one long-running labor battle, it faces two bigger disputes that could mean a transit strike this year. In fact, a strike is "very likely," according to the president of the largest union representing SEPTA workers, Transport Workers Union Local 234. The SEPTA board will meet Monday to give board chairman Pasquale T. "Pat" Deon Sr. the authority to approve a new contract with Regional Rail electrical workers, if...
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A TENTATIVE DEAL has been reached between SEPTA and one of the Regional Rail unions with which it's been locked in a long labor dispute, officials said yesterday. Representatives from the transit authority and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers agreed yesterday to the terms of a new labor contract, said Arthur Davidson, the general chairman of the union's System Council No. 7. With the contract approved by union leadership, the next step is for it to be ratified by IBEW's 220 members, who will be voting for the next two weeks on the matter, Davidson said.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WHEN JASON Walters first met Winchester, the German shepherd was a 120-pound ball of energy so big and high-strung that his overwhelmed owners had given him up to a shelter. He was exactly what Walters, a SEPTA police officer, wanted. "High-strung, for us, is a positive," said Walters, who helped transform Winchester into a working police dog (now a svelte 95 pounds from rigorous training). "Training these dogs is like playtime for them - their work is hide-and-seek. " Their partnership has proven so successful that Walters has created a charity, the Throw Away Dogs Project, that aims to train unwanted shelter dogs to be working police dogs.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A VETERAN SEPTA electrical worker was recovering last night after a close call on the subway tracks in Center City, officials said. The unidentified worker, 52, was held overnight at Hahnemann University Hospital after he was clipped by a Market-Frankford El train, according to a law-enforcement source who said "his prognosis is optimistic. " All things considered, the worker, a 27-year veteran of the transit authority, was extremely lucky: His brush with the train left him with only a long gash on his forehead and a knee injury, the source said.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the region's deteriorating bridges and ailing train stations is lucrative opportunity for a niche of businesses also in need of a helping hand: small, minority, and female contractors. SEPTA is trying to play matchmaker. With the agency planning more than $570 million in Philadelphia-area capital projects over the next two years - and more than $6.8 billion by 2026 - the transportation agency made a pitch Tuesday to involve more so-called Disadvantaged Business Enterprises in that work.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SAYS something about Kelly Morris that his funeral was attended by nearly 1,000 people, that SEPTA, his employer, had to use two buses to bring co-workers to the services. What it says is that Kelly James Morris was an exceptional human being, a man who captured the hearts and esteem of just about everybody he came in contact with. He was a man who could never pass up a chance to help a person who needed his special brand of love and caring, be it the children of neighbors, family or friends who needed a surrogate dad, the elderly, the hungry, prisoners - the full spectrum of human need.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The two unions representing SEPTA railroad engineers and electrical workers on Friday expressed disappointment with the recommendations of a presidential panel on their long-running labor dispute. The panel, appointed by President Obama, on Monday sided with SEPTA management on most of the issues in the dispute, which prompted a one-day strike last month. "We are disappointed with the recommendations of the [presidential emergency board], particularly because the board, instead of directly addressing the economic analysis of the employees, simply sidestepped the core issue of this labor dispute," the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen and IBEW Local 744 said in a joint statement.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
A presidential panel's endorsement of SEPTA's reasonable offers to two unions should be the last stop for a suspended strike that threatens to bring suburban lines to a needless standstill. Much of the public was no doubt nonplussed by the one-day Regional Rail strike last month, which came in response to SEPTA's decision to "impose" raises of as much as 11.5 percent on engineers and electrical workers after years of stalemate. Now a board of experienced arbitrators appointed by a Democratic president has reached the same conclusion that many American workers would: The raises were a generous imposition indeed.
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