CollectionsSepta
IN THE NEWS

Septa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers will vote Sunday afternoon on authorizing a strike this year or early next year. No strike appears imminent, said officials for the union and the transit authority. Transport Workers Union Local 234 is the largest of SEPTA's 17 unions, representing about 5,000 drivers, operators, mechanics, cashiers, and other workers. They have been working without a contract since the previous five-year pacts expired in March and April, and union president Willie Brown has said a strike is all but certain.
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers voted unanimously Sunday to authorize a strike, which could take effect this year or early in 2015. The voting took place in a huge Columbus Boulevard meeting hall packed with hundreds of SEPTA union members. "There wasn't a nay in the room," said Willie Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. "Members don't want to strike, but they are willing to fight for what we need. " Among the sticking points, he said, is a disagreement between the union and management about the size of pension fund contributions.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one wants a strike. "I often have no choice in the matter," said Willie Brown, 51, president of Transport Workers Local 234, the union representing SEPTA's bus drivers, subway operators, and trolley drivers. "I don't think it's a matter of if we strike," he said. "It's simply a matter of when, unfortunately. " On Sunday, union members moved a step closer to a strike, voting to allow Brown to call workers off the job - any time, and without warning. Question: You go on strike to gain benefits for workers, but do you worry that the people you are hurting most are the everyday working people who rely on transit to get to their jobs?
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Negotiators for SEPTA and Regional Rail locomotive engineers reached a tentative agreement, which will avert a possible commuter rail strike if the pact is accepted by the engineers and the SEPTA board. The deal provides for SEPTA's 220 engineers to get an 8.5 percent wage increase when the contract is approved and a 3 percent raise next April. The engineers, who have not received a raise since their last contract ended in 2010, also will get a $1,250 "signing bonus" and a 35-cent-an-hour increase immediately to reflect a traditional differential above conductors' pay. All together, the engineers' increases will amount to 13.3 percent above current pay by April, the union said.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
There won't be a SEPTA rail strike on Oct. 13. But there might be one on Feb. 10. And that could coincide with a possible strike by bus, subway, and trolley workers, shutting down the entire SEPTA system. SEPTA officials said Friday that they will ask for a second 120-day presidential emergency board to mediate the Regional Rail labor dispute when the current board's term expires at 12:01 a.m. on Oct. 13, if no settlement is reached by then. Under the federal Railway Labor Act, that would compel locomotive engineers and SEPTA to continue to operate as normal until the end of the 120 days, on Feb. 10. SEPTA's 220 locomotive engineers and 215 railroad electrical workers went on a one-day strike on June 14, before President Obama appointed the first presidential board at Gov. Corbett's request.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA riders won't have to worry about the possibility of a transit strike for at least three weeks. Leaders of Transport Workers Union Local 234 said Friday that Philadelphia bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and maintenance workers will remain on the job despite the expiration at 12:01 a.m. Saturday of their labor contract. Suburban contracts expire during the first week of April, and "if a work stoppage becomes necessary," it will happen after those contracts expire, the TWU said in a statement.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Market East Station, the 30-year-old subterranean commuter rail hub beneath Center City, will be renamed Jefferson Station in a multimillion-dollar deal between SEPTA and Jefferson Health System. SEPTA, Jefferson, and city officials will unveil new signs Thursday at a news conference in the station. The deal will mean millions of dollars for SEPTA and increased public exposure for Jefferson, whose Thomas Jefferson University Hospital complex is just two blocks south of the station.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one wants a strike. "I often have no choice in the matter," said Willie Brown, 51, president of Transport Workers Local 234, the union representing SEPTA's bus drivers, subway operators, and trolley drivers. "I don't think it's a matter of if we strike," he said. "It's simply a matter of when, unfortunately. " On Sunday, union members moved a step closer to a strike, voting to allow Brown to call workers off the job - any time, and without warning. Question: You go on strike to gain benefits for workers, but do you worry that the people you are hurting most are the everyday working people who rely on transit to get to their jobs?
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers voted unanimously Sunday to authorize a strike, which could take effect this year or early in 2015. The voting took place in a huge Columbus Boulevard meeting hall packed with hundreds of SEPTA union members. "There wasn't a nay in the room," said Willie Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. "Members don't want to strike, but they are willing to fight for what we need. " Among the sticking points, he said, is a disagreement between the union and management about the size of pension fund contributions.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JOANN JACKSON-SMITH, who has driven a SEPTA bus for three years, went to her first Transport Workers Local 234 strike vote yesterday, and brought her daughters Jasmin, 13, and Jenevieve, 11, to give them a living civics lesson. "When you stand together as a group and fight for what you believe in, you stand strong," Jackson-Smith said after more than 1,000 union members voted unanimously to authorize a strike if negotiations with SEPTA management break down. "I've never done anything like this before," Jackson-Smith said.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
REST ASSURED, commuters: If a contract dispute between SEPTA and its largest union turns sour, the city's train operators and bus and trolley drivers won't strike until next week. And if they do decide to strike, they'll give us all 24 hours' notice, according to Willie Brown, the president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. "My decision to strike is totally up to SEPTA," said Brown, who noted that, even after months of negotiations, the distance between his union and SEPTA on key matters, especially pensions, is as wide as the gap between "California and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA transit workers are likely to strike soon, their union president said Monday, but it won't be this week, and no strike date has been set as labor talks continue. Willie Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234, said workers and SEPTA management were as far apart "as California and Pennsylvania. " He said he would reassess the strike prospect after this week. The main sticking point, he said, is the union's request for changes to its pension plan. Unlike five years ago, when the TWU went on strike in the middle of a night without notice, riders this time will get 24-hour notice of an impending strike, Brown said.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
ALTHOUGH SEPTA's largest union is meeting tomorrow to take a strike vote, a source said riders don't have to worry about the subway shutting down on Monday. But what happens after that is a different story. Transport Workers Union Local 234 - which represents nearly 5,000 bus drivers and subway and trolley operators - is in the midst of heated negotiations with the transit authority over health-care benefits and pensions, according to union officials. TWU's members have been working without a contract since the spring, when the union's previous agreement expired.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers will vote Sunday afternoon on authorizing a strike this year or early next year. No strike appears imminent, said officials for the union and the transit authority. Transport Workers Union Local 234 is the largest of SEPTA's 17 unions, representing about 5,000 drivers, operators, mechanics, cashiers, and other workers. They have been working without a contract since the previous five-year pacts expired in March and April, and union president Willie Brown has said a strike is all but certain.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's long-delayed, $130-million smart-card payment system will be called SEPTA Key, the agency announced Thursday. Like Ben Franklin's key. Get it? But unlike Franklin's kite experiment, no lightning speed is involved with SEPTA's move away from tokens, passes and tickets. The first new subway turnstiles are in place, but widespread use of the card on subways and buses won't happen till next year, and on Regional Rail, not until 2016 at least. The new system will allow riders to use any "contactless" credit card or a SEPTA-issued card or even a smartphone to pay their fares at card-reading turnstiles or bus fare boxes.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER negotiating for five years, SEPTA has settled with one of its Regional Rail unions. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen reached a "tentative agreement" with the transit authority yesterday afternoon, according to a statement from union leaders. The parties approved a contract that, once ratified by the union's 200 members and by SEPTA's board of directors, would cover the union through July. "This agreement keeps the trains rolling in Philadelphia," union vice president Steve Bruno said in announcing the agreement.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Negotiators for SEPTA and Regional Rail locomotive engineers reached a tentative agreement, which will avert a possible commuter rail strike if the pact is accepted by the engineers and the SEPTA board. The deal provides for SEPTA's 220 engineers to get an 8.5 percent wage increase when the contract is approved and a 3 percent raise next April. The engineers, who have not received a raise since their last contract ended in 2010, also will get a $1,250 "signing bonus" and a 35-cent-an-hour increase immediately to reflect a traditional differential above conductors' pay. All together, the engineers' increases will amount to 13.3 percent above current pay by April, the union said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|