FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Mensah M. Dean and Daily News Staff Writer
Penny Chapman, the young mother at the center of a shocking SEPTA bus shooting last June, dabbed her eyes in court Tuesday morning, apologized and pleaded guilty to attempted murder and related counts. Common Pleas Judge Willis W. Berry Jr. accepted a negotiated guilty plea and sentenced Chapman, 21, to five to 10 years in state prison followed by five years of reporting probation. Chapman's decision to sidestep a trial — during which video would have been shown of her friends shooting up the bus on June 18 — was likely a wise decision.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
As I stood in line waiting for my train home for more than an hour Tuesday night, I debated whether the SEPTA union president had lost his mind, or whether I should get a job driving a bus. As the time passed and the guy behind me kept sneezing, I got more and more agitated at Willie Brown, the SEPTA union head who walked away from the bargaining table in the middle of the night, leaving thousands of riders in the lurch. Calling a strike without warning at 3 a.m. was dirty pool.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
By Vukan R. Vuchic SEPTA is going ahead with a major change to its Regional Rail service's line designations. It claims the change is necessary because some passengers mistakenly take a line such as the R5 toward Doylestown when they mean to take the R5 toward Bryn Mawr, in the opposite direction from Center City. However, instead of improving passenger information with better signs and clearer indications of train direction, the agency is eliminating all the "R" designations. Instead, it's naming each line after one of 20 suburban stations where it terminates, such as Lansdale or Doylestown.
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NEWS
September 17, 2016
An unidentified person was struck by an Amtrak train Thursday afternoon in Delaware County, causing a halt in service on SEPTA's Wilmington-Newark Line, officials said. About 3:35 p.m., Acela Express train 2121 heading south hit the person about a half mile from the Norwood Station. There was no immediate word on the condition of the person who was struck. None of the 206 passengers were hurt, but the train was stopped for the police investigation. Other Amtrak trains were getting through the area because two of four tracks were still open, an Amtrak spokesman said.
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Harold C. Juram, 98, an assistant general manager for SEPTA who "rode the transit system wherever he was headed" whenever possible, died Sunday, Sept. 4, at Abington Memorial Hospital of complications after a fall, his family said. He had lived in Southampton, Bucks County, before retiring to Foulkeways at Gwynedd in 1997. Mr. Juram began his career in the scheduling department of the old Philadelphia Transportation Co. (PTC), a private business that ran the trolleys, buses, trackless trolleys, subway, and elevated rail lines in the city from 1940 to 1968.
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Gladys Gershenfeld, 91, who as the first female labor arbitrator in the Philadelphia area handled a wide range of labor disputes, including those involving SEPTA and the Philadelphia Police Department, died Thursday, Aug. 25, at the Quadrangle in Haverford after suffering from Alzheimer's. Mrs. Gershenfeld was a pioneer in the field of labor arbitration. There were few women role models, if any, when she decided to pursue a master's degree in industrial relations and labor at Cornell University in 1951, said her son Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld.
NEWS
August 23, 2016
ISSUE | NORRISTOWN A bright future Montgomery County has great optimism for Norristown's future (" Norristown sees hope in project ," Wednesday). In addition to the Lafayette Street Extension Project, a number of important county and private-sector initiatives will help make Norristown's transformation possible: Strong economic development opportunities for new businesses; Working with SEPTA to expand the Norristown high-speed line to King of Prussia and increase regional rail frequency; The connection of several major regional trails in downtown Norristown; and New and proposed market-rate apartment and condo buildings throughout town.
NEWS
August 22, 2016
"When [they] don't post that stuff and don't announce that stuff, you're just at their mercy. " - Rider Laurie Gerner, about her canceled train This is no way to run a railroad: SEPTA dispatchers "flying blind," or losing track of trains because of poor communication with Amtrak, and riders not knowing when their train will show up because of chronic lateness and unreliable status reports. Each weekday, 65,000 Regional Rail passengers ride in cars dating to the 1970s, on tracks that are 100 years old. No wonder more than 40,000 trains (17 percent)
NEWS
August 20, 2016
ISSUE | SEPTA Mass-transit system is too critical to fail It was sad to read the Inquirer's analysis of the SEPTA Regional Rail network ("Why your train is late," Sunday). The SEPTA system and PATCO Speedline are two of our area's crowning achievements. In the late 1970s and early '80s, millions of federal, state, and local dollars were poured into transit projects: the Center City commuter tunnel, Broad Street subway cars, the Airport Line, West Philadelphia trolleys, and the subway closed-circuit TV surveillance.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Seven passengers reported injuries after a SEPTA bus collided with an automobile Monday night in the city's Nicetown section, an agency spokesman said. The accident occurred around 8:30 p.m. on Germantown Avenue at Juniata Street, said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. It was not immediately clear how many passengers on the bus - Route 23 heading toward Center City - were taken to hospitals. None of the injuries were life-threatening, Busch said. The cause of the accident was under investigation.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
Police are asking for help finding the man who attacked a SEPTA bus driver in South Philadelphia. Philadelphia police on Friday released surveillance footage of the suspect in the Aug. 3 assault on the Route 37 bus driver. The suspect got off the bus on the 2000 block of South Broad Street about 3 a.m. and began arguing with the driver, police said. The man then got back on the bus and pummeled the driver, punching him, slamming his head into the dashboard and biting him, police said.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
A SEPTA rider who took a Philadelphia tourist's bag containing her family's passports on Thursday returned the bag early Sunday morning following a public offer of amnesty from SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel. "On Thursday, my trip turned into a nightmare and I was so sad," said Ximena Estrada, 35, of Colombia. "But when I got that phone call, it was like, wow . I felt so grateful, so grateful. " Estrada and her children, a 14-year-old boy and a 4-year-old girl, have been visiting family in Philadelphia from South America since June.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
SEPTA police are offering amnesty to the man who took a bag off a bus in Rhawnhurst that contained passports of two children visiting with their mother from Colombia, South America. Ximena Estrada, who has been visiting family in Philadelphia for about two months, accidentally left the bag behind when she got off the Route 58 bus Thursday. Inside were passports for her 14-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter, she said Saturday. They are to return home to Colombia this Tuesday. Around 6 p.m. Thursday, Estrada was carrying a purse and red backpack on the bus, she said, when she thought she missed her stop.
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