FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers voted unanimously Sunday to authorize a strike, which could take effect this year or early in 2015. The voting took place in a huge Columbus Boulevard meeting hall packed with hundreds of SEPTA union members. "There wasn't a nay in the room," said Willie Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. "Members don't want to strike, but they are willing to fight for what we need. " Among the sticking points, he said, is a disagreement between the union and management about the size of pension fund contributions.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
As I stood in line waiting for my train home for more than an hour Tuesday night, I debated whether the SEPTA union president had lost his mind, or whether I should get a job driving a bus. As the time passed and the guy behind me kept sneezing, I got more and more agitated at Willie Brown, the SEPTA union head who walked away from the bargaining table in the middle of the night, leaving thousands of riders in the lurch. Calling a strike without warning at 3 a.m. was dirty pool.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
By Vukan R. Vuchic SEPTA is going ahead with a major change to its Regional Rail service's line designations. It claims the change is necessary because some passengers mistakenly take a line such as the R5 toward Doylestown when they mean to take the R5 toward Bryn Mawr, in the opposite direction from Center City. However, instead of improving passenger information with better signs and clearer indications of train direction, the agency is eliminating all the "R" designations. Instead, it's naming each line after one of 20 suburban stations where it terminates, such as Lansdale or Doylestown.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WARNING: The above video contains language some would find inappropriate. A SEPTA TRANSIT Police officer is being investigated by Internal Affairs for a physical altercation with a man holding a toddler on the El, authorities said. The confrontation, which was captured on cellphone video and posted on Facebook, occurred about 5 p.m. Thursday on the Market-Frankford line. SEPTA police said the man boarded the train at the Margaret-Orthodox station without paying his fare. Surveillance video released yesterday by SEPTA shows the following chain of events: The first officer boards the train at Erie-Torresdale and begins a conversation with the man, who is seated holding a little girl.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
WARNING: The above video contains language some would find inappropriate. A SEPTA police officer was captured on video shoving an alleged fare evader by the throat into a subway train's wall - while the man holds his toddler daughter. The video, recorded on a transit authority camera in a westbound Market-Frankford El train Thursday, was played for reporters at an afternoon news conference held by SEPTA Police Chief Thomas Nestel III. Nestel said that his department "doesn't teach people to do that" and that an internal investigation had been launched.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The SEPTA board on Thursday approved, without discussion, changes to the pension plan for SEPTA's 1,800 nonunion workers. The changes will require management and administrative employees, who now pay 1 percent of theirannual salary toward their pension fund, to contribute 2.5 percent starting in December and 3.5 percent starting in December 2016. Also, the formula for determining the pension pay-out will be changed, to increase the value of a future pension for employees who remain with SEPTA for many years.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA managers and other nonunion employees will be required to pay more toward their pensions, and managers hired in the future will be offered smaller pensions, under a plan expected to be approved Thursday by the SEPTA board. About 1,800 supervisory, administrative, and management employees will be affected by the changes, designed to improve the "long-term financial stability" of the transit agency's pension plan, SEPTA officials said Wednesday. The move is the latest by a public employer to reduce pension costs and shift more of the expense to employees and away from taxpayers.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA Regional Rail trains will be more crowded than usual this summer, as crews take railcars out of service to install equipment needed for a new "positive train control" system. SEPTA said "10 or more" cars in the 351-car fleet will be out of service at any given time for the upgrades until at least November. That will mean many trains, which are often six cars long, will be shortened by at least one car. And that will mean packed conditions for passengers in the remaining cars.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman was attacked and slashed with a box cutter Wednesday morning while walking into a El stop in Frankford, SEPTA officials said. Transit police were still searching for the suspect in the case Wednesday afternoon, said SEPTA Police Chief Thomas Nestel III. The attack happened at 9:27 a.m., officials said, when a woman tried to enter the Margaret-Orthodox station of the Market-Frankford Line and got into an argument with a man inside the station....
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writerbrandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
SEPTA Transit Police are searching for a person of interest after a woman was slashed with a box cutter at the Margaret-Orthodox station on the Market-Frankford Line this morning. A man punched a 50-year-old woman and sliced her forearm with the weapon during an argument around 9:30 a.m., SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel said at a news conference. The woman, who lives near the station and did not know her attacker, had raised her arm to protect herself. The blade left a 5-inch gash in the arm, Nestel said.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
POPE FRANCIS is a man who likes to walk among the people, and those who are planning to see the pope in Philadelphia this September should be prepared to walk as well. Today marks 100 days until Pope Francis' visit and in advance of his trip, officials held a news conference at City Hall yesterday to give preliminary information about transportation during the papal visit. The one big takeaway: Unless you're in the Popemobile, don't try to drive in or around Center City on Sept.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA on Friday celebrated an accomplishment that took 15 years, cost about $50 million, and is virtually invisible to its Regional Rail passengers. Crews installed a plaqueonthe overhead catenary wires by the Wallingford station marking the installation of 150 miles of new wiring to reduce train delays and improve performance. Catenary wires provide electric power to run Regional Rail trains over the system's 280 miles of track. Friday was a rare chance for SEPTA workers like lineman first class Bernie Shine, 49, of Collingswood, to bask in the limelight.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Setbacks are for comebacks. Those were the words Dupree Norman, 53, used during his speech, which drew thunderous applause at the District 1199C Training and Upgrading Fund graduation ceremony at the Kimmel Center. After many odd jobs and getting fired from a job, followed by six years of unemployment, Norman has a job in health care. He completed the union's free behavioral health technician training program and graduated June 4. "I came to 1199C when I needed a change," he said.
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