FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A flawed weld that attaches a plate to a key weight-bearing beam is at the root of SEPTA's rail-car woes, the company that built the cars acknowledged for the first time Tuesday. "The design of how it was welded and the weld itself are in question," Andrew Hyer, marketing and business-development manager at Hyundai Rotem, said Tuesday in the company's first extended comments since cracks in the beams forced SEPTA to pull one-third of its rail cars from service. "How we decide to weld the material may make all the difference," Hyer said.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
Jammed platforms. Brutal delays. Passengers left stranded as packed-to-capacity trains sped past. And, because some people were likely off Tuesday for the holiday, things will probably get worse, especially for riders from inner-ring suburbs who will have to contend with the most crowded trains. "It could be a little worse tomorrow," said Jeff Knueppel, SEPTA's general manager, during a news conference Tuesday. "I wish I didn't feel that way but I've got to say it. " And the problems could last all summer, officials said, because they don't know whether a temporary weld can get the trains back in service until new beams are installed.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
As I stood in line waiting for my train home for more than an hour Tuesday night, I debated whether the SEPTA union president had lost his mind, or whether I should get a job driving a bus. As the time passed and the guy behind me kept sneezing, I got more and more agitated at Willie Brown, the SEPTA union head who walked away from the bargaining table in the middle of the night, leaving thousands of riders in the lurch. Calling a strike without warning at 3 a.m. was dirty pool.
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NEWS
August 17, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Seven passengers reported injuries after a SEPTA bus collided with an automobile Monday night in the city's Nicetown section, an agency spokesman said. The accident occurred around 8:30 p.m. on Germantown Avenue at Juniata Street, said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. It was not immediately clear how many passengers on the bus - Route 23 heading toward Center City - were taken to hospitals. None of the injuries were life-threatening, Busch said. The cause of the accident was under investigation.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
Police are asking for help finding the man who attacked a SEPTA bus driver in South Philadelphia. Philadelphia police on Friday released surveillance footage of the suspect in the Aug. 3 assault on the Route 37 bus driver. The suspect got off the bus on the 2000 block of South Broad Street about 3 a.m. and began arguing with the driver, police said. The man then got back on the bus and pummeled the driver, punching him, slamming his head into the dashboard and biting him, police said.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
A SEPTA rider who took a Philadelphia tourist's bag containing her family's passports on Thursday returned the bag early Sunday morning following a public offer of amnesty from SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel. "On Thursday, my trip turned into a nightmare and I was so sad," said Ximena Estrada, 35, of Colombia. "But when I got that phone call, it was like, wow . I felt so grateful, so grateful. " Estrada and her children, a 14-year-old boy and a 4-year-old girl, have been visiting family in Philadelphia from South America since June.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
SEPTA police are offering amnesty to the man who took a bag off a bus in Rhawnhurst that contained passports of two children visiting with their mother from Colombia, South America. Ximena Estrada, who has been visiting family in Philadelphia for about two months, accidentally left the bag behind when she got off the Route 58 bus Thursday. Inside were passports for her 14-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter, she said Saturday. They are to return home to Colombia this Tuesday. Around 6 p.m. Thursday, Estrada was carrying a purse and red backpack on the bus, she said, when she thought she missed her stop.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
A SEPTA train struck and killed a woman in Delaware County Wednesday night. The incident happened about 9:30 p.m. on the Media/Elwyn Region Rail Line near the Fernwood Station Station in Yeadon Borough, according to Kristin Geiger, a SEPTA spokeswoman. The unidentified woman in her late 50s was in the track area and the train could not stop in time, said Geiger. The incident is still under investigation and it is not clear why the woman was on the tracks. Approximately 75 passengers were on the train at the time and were transferred to buses.
NEWS
August 4, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A 34-year-old Holmesburg man was held for trial Tuesday on charges stemming from a May hit-and-run that critically injured an off-duty SEPTA Transit Police officer. The officer, Gary Miller, 44, was out for an afternoon run on Rowland Avenue in Holmesburg on May 22 when he was hit by a Saturn sedan. Jeffrey Soder, also known as Jeffrey Sickel, was charged with aggravated assault by vehicle, driving under the influence, and related charges. Soder, of the 4600 block of Kraydor Street, was ordered held for trial after a preliminary hearing before Municipal Judge Wendy Pew. He remains in custody at the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility in Holmesburg.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
A SEPTA Transit Police officer who deployed pepper spray through a fence at protesters during the Democratic National Convention in South Philadelphia this week was found to be justified in his actions, according to a SEPTA spokesman. The incident, which was captured on video and uploaded to YouTube on Tuesday, begins with the officer calmly deploying the pepper spray at protesters, one of whom attempts to shield his face with a homemade sign. Among the people hit by the spray is Anna Marie Stenberg, 69, a pro-Bernie Sanders protester from California.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Getting around Philadelphia on the second day of the Democratic National Convention was largely a repeat of the protests, detours, and delays that have inconvenienced the region since the event began. Once again, protests stalled service on the Broad Street Line on Tuesday afternoon from Oregon Avenue to the AT&T Station, the stop closest to the Wells Fargo Center, where the convention's evening events were held. SEPTA restored full service after 30 minutes, only to end all service between the two stations shortly before 7:30 p.m. for what officials described as security reasons.
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin and Michaelle Bond, STAFF WRITERS
The first day of the Democratic National Convention saw travelers by car, train, and bus delayed. Officials at transportation agencies said it was likely that traffic jams, bus detours, and unexpected disruptions would continue to be part of getting around Philadelphia until the donkeys leave town. The first troubles came on I-95 during the morning commute. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation had initially planned to keep all lanes open to passenger vehicles, but over the weekend found that truckers were not aware of a ban on vehicles weighing five tons or more and were still using the highway, said Eugene Blaum, a PennDot spokesman.
NEWS
July 26, 2016
Bus crash hurts 2 pedestrians, 26 riders Police are investigating a crash that occurred in Yeadon, Delaware County, at around 6:20 p.m. Sunday. Andrew Busch, a SEPTA spokesman, said a Route 113 bus was traveling south on Lansdowne Avenue when a Jeep Liberty turned left off of Providence Road and collided with the bus. Two adults near the site of the collision were hit by the bus and were in critical condition at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Busch said. There were 26 SEPTA passengers on board, all of whom sustained non-life-threatening injuries.
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