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NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SAYS something about Kelly Morris that his funeral was attended by nearly 1,000 people, that SEPTA, his employer, had to use two buses to bring co-workers to the services. What it says is that Kelly James Morris was an exceptional human being, a man who captured the hearts and esteem of just about everybody he came in contact with. He was a man who could never pass up a chance to help a person who needed his special brand of love and caring, be it the children of neighbors, family or friends who needed a surrogate dad, the elderly, the hungry, prisoners - the full spectrum of human need.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
DOUGLAS Ioven, the SEPTA police officer arrested last month for allegedly arresting a woman on Christmas morning after she attempted to file a complaint against him, yesterday was ordered to stand trial for witness intimidation, retaliation against a witness, false imprisonment and related counts. Common Pleas Judge Teresa Carr Deni made the ruling after Muibat Williamson testified during a preliminary hearing about the encounter with Ioven at Suburban Station last Christmas. Williamson, a registered nurse, had just left work and stopped at a Dunkin' Donuts in the station about 8 a.m. when Ioven, 42, who was in uniform, cut to the front of the line and stepped on her foot, she said.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
New passenger buses ordered by SEPTA have been delayed by production problems, forcing the transit agency to continue operating old buses that are increasingly prone to mechanical breakdowns. The first of 275 new electric-diesel buses purchased for $202.6 million was delivered this week, SEPTA officials said Wednesday. The first bus is more than a year behind schedule. The vehicles are being built by Nova Bus, Inc., a subsidiary of Volvo Bus Corp., headquartered in Saint-Eustache, Quebec, Canada.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The chances of a transit strike against SEPTA are "very good," union president Willie Brown said Wednesday. "My objective is not to get a strike, I don't look forward to a strike . . . but we're not going to sign a contract full of givebacks," said Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234, which represents about 5,500 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and mechanics. "I'm prepared for a long strike," Brown said in an interview. SEPTA and the union are far apart in negotiations, and no talks have been held since the contract for transit workers in Philadelphia expired March 15. Three other contracts for suburban bus drivers, mechanics, and clerical workers expire April 1 and April 7. The TWU said last week no strike would occur until after those contracts expire.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SAYS something about Kelly Morris that his funeral was attended by nearly 1,000 people, that SEPTA, his employer, had to use two buses to bring co-workers to the services. What it says is that Kelly James Morris was an exceptional human being, a man who captured the hearts and esteem of just about everybody he came in contact with. He was a man who could never pass up a chance to help a person who needed his special brand of love and caring, be it the children of neighbors, family or friends who needed a surrogate dad, the elderly, the hungry, prisoners - the full spectrum of human need.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The two unions representing SEPTA railroad engineers and electrical workers on Friday expressed disappointment with the recommendations of a presidential panel on their long-running labor dispute. The panel, appointed by President Obama, on Monday sided with SEPTA management on most of the issues in the dispute, which prompted a one-day strike last month. "We are disappointed with the recommendations of the [presidential emergency board], particularly because the board, instead of directly addressing the economic analysis of the employees, simply sidestepped the core issue of this labor dispute," the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen and IBEW Local 744 said in a joint statement.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
A presidential panel's endorsement of SEPTA's reasonable offers to two unions should be the last stop for a suspended strike that threatens to bring suburban lines to a needless standstill. Much of the public was no doubt nonplussed by the one-day Regional Rail strike last month, which came in response to SEPTA's decision to "impose" raises of as much as 11.5 percent on engineers and electrical workers after years of stalemate. Now a board of experienced arbitrators appointed by a Democratic president has reached the same conclusion that many American workers would: The raises were a generous imposition indeed.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
DOUGLAS Ioven, the SEPTA police officer arrested last month for allegedly arresting a woman on Christmas morning after she attempted to file a complaint against him, yesterday was ordered to stand trial for witness intimidation, retaliation against a witness, false imprisonment and related counts. Common Pleas Judge Teresa Carr Deni made the ruling after Muibat Williamson testified during a preliminary hearing about the encounter with Ioven at Suburban Station last Christmas. Williamson, a registered nurse, had just left work and stopped at a Dunkin' Donuts in the station about 8 a.m. when Ioven, 42, who was in uniform, cut to the front of the line and stepped on her foot, she said.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA police are field testing video cameras that clip onto officers' shirts and record everything they do, officials announced Tuesday. The camera, which connects to an officer's handheld police radio, records video and audio, and can take photos, said SEPTA Police Chief Thomas Nestel. "The benefit of that is that every contact that an officer has will then be video- and audiotaped. It's a tremendous benefit for police, a tremendous benefit for the public," Nestel said. "We're experimenting.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
POLICE ARRESTED a SEPTA passenger and confiscated four BB guns, ammunition, two large butcher knives and a meat cleaver he carried with him Monday night as he rode the Broad Street Line. Darryl Donahue, 52, of Germantown, told officers he had the weapons for protection, SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel said. He was riding the Broad Street Line north when a passenger noticed the "telltale bulge" of a gun in his waistband, took his photo with her smartphone and alerted police, Nestel said.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN ITS REPORT filed yesterday, a board called by President Obama to end a years-long labor dispute sided with SEPTA on raises and pension-plan contributions - two major sticking points behind a one-day Regional Rail strike last month. "We are pleased with the results of the report," said Jerri Williams, a SEPTA spokeswoman. "It's what we've been trying to explain in negotiations with the unions for a number of years. " The board recommends that the wage increases paid out to the members of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers should be the same (11.5 percent)
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A panel appointed by President Obama sided with SEPTA management Monday on most of the issues in its long-running labor dispute with Regional Rail engineers and electrical workers. The presidential emergency board, whose recommendations are not binding, said the rail workers should get the same 11.5 percent raises negotiated in a five-year contract in 2009 by bus drivers and subway operators. The railroad workers are not entitled to retroactive raises or an additional increase based on a pension boost received by the bus drivers' union, the board said.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IF YOU see a SEPTA Transit Police officer in the next few days, be sure to smile - you may be on camera. This week, the force is beginning a trial run of body-mounted cameras on its officers, an initiative officials have had their eyes on for months. "It improves public trust," SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel said. "If people know police have cameras on uniform, they have more faith that officers are acting properly. " Nestel's a self-admitted fan of technology - he boasts more than 2,000 Twitter followers - and says the cameras can be a valuable tool for the force.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
An alleged drunken driver ran a red light and rammed a SEPTA paratransit bus in Fairhill, causing it to overturn and sending five people to nearby hospitals, Philadelphia police said. The 48-year-old driver of a brown Cadillac was driving southbound on North Sixth Street when he failed to stop at a red light at West Cambria Street, hitting the bus around 2 p.m., police said. The bus - part of SEPTA's Customized Community Transportation program for senior citizens and people with disabilities - overturned and also hit a light pole.
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