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NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers voted unanimously Sunday to authorize a strike, which could take effect this year or early in 2015. The voting took place in a huge Columbus Boulevard meeting hall packed with hundreds of SEPTA union members. "There wasn't a nay in the room," said Willie Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. "Members don't want to strike, but they are willing to fight for what we need. " Among the sticking points, he said, is a disagreement between the union and management about the size of pension fund contributions.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
As I stood in line waiting for my train home for more than an hour Tuesday night, I debated whether the SEPTA union president had lost his mind, or whether I should get a job driving a bus. As the time passed and the guy behind me kept sneezing, I got more and more agitated at Willie Brown, the SEPTA union head who walked away from the bargaining table in the middle of the night, leaving thousands of riders in the lurch. Calling a strike without warning at 3 a.m. was dirty pool.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
By Vukan R. Vuchic SEPTA is going ahead with a major change to its Regional Rail service's line designations. It claims the change is necessary because some passengers mistakenly take a line such as the R5 toward Doylestown when they mean to take the R5 toward Bryn Mawr, in the opposite direction from Center City. However, instead of improving passenger information with better signs and clearer indications of train direction, the agency is eliminating all the "R" designations. Instead, it's naming each line after one of 20 suburban stations where it terminates, such as Lansdale or Doylestown.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
COMING TO a SEPTA trolley, bus or train-stop near you: Anti-Islamic advertising, courtesy of the far-right group American Freedom Defense Initiative. At least, that may be where we're headed, after a judge's decision last week seemed to clear the way for the AFDI to expand its transit ad campaign beyond New York City, where it's currently assaulting eyeballs on Metro Transit Authority buses and trains. Back in September, the AFDI filed a lawsuit against SEPTA that accused the transit agency of violating the group's free-speech rights when it refused to sell ad space to AFDI.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
PAUL "EARTHQUAKE" Moore, a former boxer turned soul-of-Southwest-Philly activist, is a force-of-nature food and toy gatherer during the holidays. He gave turkey-and-trimmings Thanksgiving dinners to 80 needy families - food he collected by sitting outside a big rental truck for 24 hours in the cold, inviting compassionate people to fill it. They did. Afterward, Moore thanked major food donors Barbara Capozzi, a South Philly real estate agent; Pasco Inc., a Southwest Philly scrap metal recycler, and the Island Super Market on Woodland Avenue near Island Avenue, which donated 10 turkeys and fed Moore cheesesteaks and coffee all night long.
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Regional Rail engineers have asked federal regulators to require SEPTA to follow a safety rule designed to limit fatigue. SEPTA wants the Federal Railroad Administration to renew a waiver that the transit agency has had from the work rule for two years. The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen asked the federal agency to deny SEPTA's request and hold a public hearing on the issue, citing accidents at other railroads caused by fatigued engineers. A sleep-deprived engineer was blamed for a fatal accident in New York last year in which a Metro-North Railroad train derailed while taking a 30 m.p.h.
NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's board of directors on Thursday approved the recently negotiated contract with 5,000 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, cashiers, and mechanics. The agreement with members of Transport Workers Union Local 234 avoided a possible transit strike. The pact, ratified this month by TWU members, provides a 5 percent raise over the two-year term of the contract. But it postpones difficult decisions on two major issues that will resurface soon: pensions and health-care contributions.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Normal service resumed on SEPTA's Trenton commuter rail line shortly before noon Tuesday, about two and a half hours after a person was struck and killed south of the Bristol station. A 35-year-old man was struck by a Philadelphia-bound Regional Rail train between the Bristol and Croydon stations at about 9:15 a.m., a SEPTA spokeswoman said. The two-car train's 96 passengers were transferred to another train to complete their journey, and service was affected for trains in both directions until about 11:45 a.m.  
BUSINESS
November 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A SEPTA worker involved in a fatal 2009 Regional Rail accident is fighting a federal effort to disqualify him from safety-sensitive rail work until 2019. Vance Almond, 57, of South Philadelphia, contends he is being made a scapegoat in the death of rail inspector Kevin Sparks, who was hit and killed by a West Trenton train on Nov. 5, 2009, during a transit strike. About 8:30 a.m. that day, Train 327 was coming out of a curve at 65 m.p.h., traveling south on tracks usually used by northbound trains, just south of the Melrose Park station, federal accident investigators found.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
SEPTA'S subway trains will keep on a-rolling all night long on weekends, even though they cost more to operate than the Night Owl buses they replace. Make that about $34,000 more, according to statistics from the transit authority. So why is SEPTA shelling out the extra dough for the service? To benefit the riders who executives say have served the company so well. "You have to look at the bigger picture," Richard Burnfield, SEPTA's chief financial officer, told the Daily News . "When we consider overnight train service, we see it as a benefit not just to SEPTA, but also to the people in the city and the entire region.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of Transport Workers Union Local 234 on Friday ratified a two-year contract with SEPTA that will provide a 5 percent pay raise over that span. The sides reached a tentative agreement late last week after the union threatened to strike. The union represents 5,000 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, cashiers, and mechanics. The two-year deal allowed both sides to postpone decisions on pension and health-care issues. The terms are expected to set the pattern for other unions representing SEPTA employees.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 12-year veteran of SEPTA's transit police is facing criminal charges after allegedly masturbating on the Broad Street Line while off-duty, agency officials said. Officer Kevin Fant, 44, facing charges of indecent exposure and open lewdness, was expected to surrender Monday night to the Philadelphia Police Department, said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. "Disgusting and shameful," Transit Police Chief Thomas J. Nestel 3d tweeted late Monday afternoon. SEPTA's social media team was tipped off Oct. 25 to an online video showing a man masturbating on a Broad Street subway car. The video was originally posted in August.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THIS WAS far from a stroke of genius. Kevin Fant, 44, a SEPTA Transit Police officer, was placed on administrative leave yesterday after he was literally caught with his pants down, Jerri Williams, a SEPTA spokeswoman, said in a statement. A video of Fant allegedly masturbating on a subway train reached SEPTA's administration last week, according to Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel. The footage, recorded in August on a Broad Street Line train, shows Fant getting in touch with himself while off duty.
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