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NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A grant of nearly $2.6 million will bring emissions-free electric buses to Philadelphia streets. "We looked at the economics, and we looked at the impact on the environment, and we thought on both fronts this was a good decision for the authority," said Rich Burnfield, SEPTA's deputy general manager. The Federal Transportation Administration grant, announced Tuesday, will help pay for 25 electric buses from Proterra, a California-based manufacturer. Matt Horton, one of the company's senior vice presidents, said SEPTA's order was one of the largest from a major transit agency.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
As I stood in line waiting for my train home for more than an hour Tuesday night, I debated whether the SEPTA union president had lost his mind, or whether I should get a job driving a bus. As the time passed and the guy behind me kept sneezing, I got more and more agitated at Willie Brown, the SEPTA union head who walked away from the bargaining table in the middle of the night, leaving thousands of riders in the lurch. Calling a strike without warning at 3 a.m. was dirty pool.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
By Vukan R. Vuchic SEPTA is going ahead with a major change to its Regional Rail service's line designations. It claims the change is necessary because some passengers mistakenly take a line such as the R5 toward Doylestown when they mean to take the R5 toward Bryn Mawr, in the opposite direction from Center City. However, instead of improving passenger information with better signs and clearer indications of train direction, the agency is eliminating all the "R" designations. Instead, it's naming each line after one of 20 suburban stations where it terminates, such as Lansdale or Doylestown.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
For falsely arresting a nurse on Christmas 2013, former SEPTA Police Officer Douglas Ioven must spend four hours each Christmas for the next four years doing community service. That was part of a novel Noel sentence handed down Friday by a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge. In March, Ioven, 44, was found guilty of false imprisonment and official oppression for arresting nurse Muibat Williamson at Suburban Station, following a contentious confrontation between the two at a Dunkin' Donuts store.
NEWS
May 14, 2016
Two SEPTA passengers were injured Thursday afternoon after a trolley and SUV crashed in the Ludlow section of Philadelphia, officials said. SEPTA spokeswoman Kristin Geiger said the crash, which occurred at Ninth Street and Girard Avenue, involved a Route 15 trolley. The extent of the passengers' injuries was unknown. Geiger said she wasn't sure if any more passengers were riding the trolley at the time of the crash. The SUV driver's condition was also unknown. SEPTA is running shuttle buses between 15th Street and the Delaware Loop until the trolley route can be cleared.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
SEPTA Police Chief Thomas Nestel III used a Taser on a man in Kensington on Wednesday afternoon while responding to a situation involving a group of neighborhood residents and two intoxicated men, a spokeswoman for the transit authority said. According to spokeswoman Carla Showell-Lee, around 2:40 p.m. a drunken driver - with his equally intoxicated passenger beside him - hit several parked cars at Frankford Avenue and Cambria Street. Residents tried to hold the men down until police arrived, but a large "melee" ensued, Showell-Lee said.
NEWS
May 12, 2016
A bicyclist died Tuesday afternoon after being struck by a SEPTA bus in Frankford, police said. About noon, the male cyclist cut in front of a Route J bus traveling on Orthodox Street near Aramingo Avenue, police said. The bus struck the cyclist, who was taken to Aria Health's Frankford hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 12:12 p.m., police said. The bus driver stopped at the scene. The bus had no passengers at the time, but was in service, SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch said.
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Tommy Rowan, STAFF WRITER
A former city employee pleaded guilty Monday to forging and selling fake SEPTA passes to City Hall workers, prosecutors said. Mark Cooper, 35, worked for Philly 311, the city's Call Center. Federal prosecutors say he and his co-worker Kimberly Adams sold more than $10,000 worth of forged TransPass cards between August 2013 and June 2015. The duo sold about 2,000 fake passes for about $50 apiece, prosecutors said. The passes - which allow unlimited monthly travel on buses, trolleys and subways - retail at $91 a month.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
A school bus driver turned away from a job as a SEPTA bus operator because of a drug conviction dating back nearly 20 years filed a federal lawsuit against the transit agency Wednesday. The suit said SEPTA violates federal employment laws by routinely misusing criminal-history information turned up in background checks to eliminate potential employees, even when the offenses happened long ago and are irrelevant to the job. SEPTA said it would have no comment on the lawsuit. "People change their lives," said Frank Long, 56, of Philadelphia's Logan section, now a delivery-truck driver.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A SEPTA police officer who found a man unconscious at the 69th Street Transportation Center in Upper Darby on Thursday accidentally got pricked by an uncapped needle in the man's pocket and was taken to a hospital to be examined, authorities said. It was about 2 p.m. when the officer saw the man, who looked like he was in his 20s, in a passenger waiting area, SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch said. The officer, a 25-year veteran, went to check if the man was breathing, Busch said.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A grant of nearly $2.6 million will bring emissions-free electric buses to Philadelphia streets. "We looked at the economics, and we looked at the impact on the environment, and we thought on both fronts this was a good decision for the authority," said Rich Burnfield, SEPTA's deputy general manager. The Federal Transportation Administration grant, announced Tuesday, will help pay for 25 electric buses from Proterra, a California-based manufacturer. Matt Horton, one of the company's senior vice presidents, said SEPTA's order was one of the largest from a major transit agency.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
The city's annual Philly Spring Cleanup is happening on Saturday as neighborhoods and volunteers across the city help spruce up the streets. The cleanup is taking place now until 2 p.m. The Streets Department will pick up bagged trash and debris at designated locations after 2 p.m. For more info, visit www.PhillySpringCleanup.com , or just go outside and help your neighbors if you see a cleanup in progress. Hundreds of SEPTA employees and City Year corps members are among many who will be helping clean city streets.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Transit agencies around the country will be watching SEPTA June 13. That's the debut, announced Friday, of the long-promised smart-fare card, SEPTA Key. It is among the most complicated systems of its kind, designed to manage fares for trains, buses, and trolleys with an open payment system, which will eventually accept not just the branded SEPTA card but certain bank cards. "Everyone is watching Philadelphia," said Walter Allen, who runs Acumen Building Enterprise, an Oakland, Calif., company that installs similar systems.
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