FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of SEPTA's delayed $130 million smart-card fare system retired last week and went to work for the company that is assisting SEPTA in creating the new system. John McGee, SEPTA's chief officer of new payment technologies, is prohibited by SEPTA rules from working on the SEPTA project for one year for his new employer, LTK Engineering Services of Ambler. A SEPTA spokesman said McGee's departure would not further delay the installation of the smart-card system, which will replace tokens, passes, transfers, and tickets on SEPTA's buses, subways, trolleys and, eventually, Regional Rail trains.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The chances of a transit strike against SEPTA are "very good," union president Willie Brown said Wednesday. "My objective is not to get a strike, I don't look forward to a strike . . . but we're not going to sign a contract full of givebacks," said Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234, which represents about 5,500 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and mechanics. "I'm prepared for a long strike," Brown said in an interview. SEPTA and the union are far apart in negotiations, and no talks have been held since the contract for transit workers in Philadelphia expired March 15. Three other contracts for suburban bus drivers, mechanics, and clerical workers expire April 1 and April 7. The TWU said last week no strike would occur until after those contracts expire.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Philadelphia-area commuters, the possibility of a first-ever transit strike by all SEPTA union workers could loom large when a federally mandated mediation process for Regional Rail engineers expires later this year. After that, the engineers, who have been working without a new contract since 2010, would be permitted to strike. SEPTA's labor contract with city bus drivers and subway operators has already expired, and contracts with suburban operators and mechanics will expire in early April.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 17, 2014
SEPTA's response to demand for overnight subway service has the momentum that's missing from its efforts to dispense with Mesozoic token technology. The Inquirer reported this week that the agency plans to operate trains at all hours on weekends this summer in a welcome effort to take advantage of increased ridership and revived nightlife. SEPTA's proposed operating budget for the next fiscal year includes funds to run the Market-Frankford and Broad Street lines between midnight and 5 a.m., reintroducing service that was discontinued to cut costs in 1991.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA will restore all-night subway service on Fridays and Saturdays, at least temporarily, beginning in June, officials said Monday. SEPTA's proposed new operating budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1 includes several hundred thousand dollars to run the Broad Street and Market-Frankford Lines all night on Fridays and Saturdays. Since 1991, subway service has been halted between midnight and 5 a.m., with Nite Owl buses substituted on those routes. Increasing nightlife and residential activity in Center City prompted SEPTA officials to bring back the subway service.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of SEPTA's delayed $130 million smart-card fare system retired last week and went to work for the company that is assisting SEPTA in creating the new system. John McGee, SEPTA's chief officer of new payment technologies, is prohibited by SEPTA rules from working on the SEPTA project for one year for his new employer, LTK Engineering Services of Ambler. A SEPTA spokesman said McGee's departure would not further delay the installation of the smart-card system, which will replace tokens, passes, transfers, and tickets on SEPTA's buses, subways, trolleys and, eventually, Regional Rail trains.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
More than 350,000 daily passengers are counting on SEPTA and its workers to reach a labor pact without a strike. But as important as uninterrupted service is to the city and its economy, there's a good deal more riding on an agreement between the transit agency and its 5,500 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and mechanics. With a recent infusion of $400 million a year in state funding championed by Gov. Corbett, and with improved service and finances under general manager Joseph M. Casey, SEPTA also has a newly burnished reputation that it must keep on track.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WILLIE BROWN, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234, who shocked the city in 2009 by suddenly calling a SEPTA strike that lasted six days, said yesterday that he won't strike any time soon, as long as both sides are negotiating. Actually, both sides haven't been negotiating since Sunday, when SEPTA submitted its "final offer based on the two-year framework that the union requested," said Jerri Williams, the transit agency's spokeswoman. SEPTA proposed a 5 percent wage hike over two years, along with a 1 percent increase in union members' health-care contributions.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Transit union negotiators will not resume talks with SEPTA until it provides extensive documentation on health-insurance and pension costs, Transport Workers Union Local 234 president Willie Brown said Tuesday. But Brown said a strike by transit workers "is not in my immediate future. " Union leaders have not called for a strike-authorization vote. "As long as we get some movement, we're going to negotiate," he said. In a phone conversation with reporters Tuesday, Brown blasted SEPTA for paying much higher pensions to managers than to union workers, calling it a "clash of the classes.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA officials waited Monday for a union response to the transit agency's "final offer" in labor negotiations aimed at avoiding a strike by bus and subway workers. Union leaders told SEPTA on Monday they could not continue negotiations on key elements of a proposed contract without more information from SEPTA. No new talks were scheduled. But a strike did not appear imminent, as no strike-authorization vote had been called by leaders of Transport Workers Union Local 234. The last of four contracts for about 5,500 city and suburban bus, subway, and other nonrailroad workers expired Sunday night, raising the prospect of the first strike against SEPTA since 2009.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | BY NAVEED AHSAN, Daily News Staff Writer ahsann@phillynews.com, 215-854-5904
A 21-YEAR-OLD man was struck and killed by a SEPTA Regional Rail train just south of the Noble Station in Jenkintown yesterday afternoon, officials said. The train, outbound from Center City on the West Trenton Line, struck the man on the tracks near Old York and Baeder roads about 4:30 p.m., said Kristin Geiger, a SEPTA spokeswoman. No evidence of foul play was found at the scene, officials said, but an investigation into the man's death is continuing. Service was suspended until about 6:30 p.m. Nearly 500 passengers were transferred to shuttle buses to continue their travels during the service suspension.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TWENTY-TWO PEOPLE were hospitalized yesterday after a violent crash sent a SEPTA bus careening into a building in Chinatown, authorities said. The collision happened just before 5 p.m. yesterday at the intersection of 11th and Vine streets, SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch said. A Mazda sedan blew through a red light on Vine Street and slammed into the side of a Route 23 bus, forcing the bus onto the sidewalk, where it smashed into a traffic light, three parked cars and the side of the Chinese Christian Church & Center before coming to a stop, SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas J. Nestel said at the scene.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
CENTER CITY More than 20 people were taken to hospitals after a SEPTA bus was struck by a car that ran a red light in Center City late Friday afternoon, police said. About 4:49 p.m., a Route 23 bus was heading north on 11th Street when a 2011 Mazda traveling west on Vine Street crashed into the front right side of the bus, police said. The bus jumped a curb, knocked down a traffic light, hit three parked cars, and scraped the side of a church before coming to a stop, police said.
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