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NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Market East Station, the 30-year-old subterranean commuter rail hub beneath Center City, will be renamed Jefferson Station in a multimillion-dollar deal between SEPTA and Jefferson Health System. SEPTA, Jefferson, and city officials will unveil new signs Thursday at a news conference in the station. The deal will mean millions of dollars for SEPTA and increased public exposure for Jefferson, whose Thomas Jefferson University Hospital complex is just two blocks south of the station.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers voted unanimously Sunday to authorize a strike, which could take effect this year or early in 2015. The voting took place in a huge Columbus Boulevard meeting hall packed with hundreds of SEPTA union members. "There wasn't a nay in the room," said Willie Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. "Members don't want to strike, but they are willing to fight for what we need. " Among the sticking points, he said, is a disagreement between the union and management about the size of pension fund contributions.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
As I stood in line waiting for my train home for more than an hour Tuesday night, I debated whether the SEPTA union president had lost his mind, or whether I should get a job driving a bus. As the time passed and the guy behind me kept sneezing, I got more and more agitated at Willie Brown, the SEPTA union head who walked away from the bargaining table in the middle of the night, leaving thousands of riders in the lurch. Calling a strike without warning at 3 a.m. was dirty pool.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A SEPTA board committee has approved new labor contracts with two rail unions, paving the way for approval by the full board next week. Members of both unions, which represent about 140 maintenance workers, clerks and passenger-service employees, voted last week to ratify the contracts, which provide a 5 percent raise over the 31-month term of the pacts. The contracts with the Brotherhood of Railway Carmen and the Transportation Communications International Union/International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers followed the pattern set last fall by the contract negotiated with the largest of SEPTA's 17 unions, Transport Workers Union Local 234. pnussbaum@phillynews.com 215-854-4587 @nussbaumpaul
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA is preparing to launch a $22 million remake of the Margaret-Orthodox elevated station on the Market-Frankford Line and Arrott Transportation Center in Frankford. A committee of the SEPTA board on Thursday approved a plan to award a $20.9 million construction contract to James J. Anderson Construction Co., of Philadelphia, and a $1.1 million contract to Lima Co., of Philadelphia. If the full board approves the contracts next week, work is expected to start by June to install three elevators, security cameras, new structural steel, new transformers and communications systems.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | ABBY CRUZ, Daily News Staff Writer cruza@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
VERNON WILKINS travels the city on buses, subways and foot, selling $1 carrot cupcakes he bakes from scratch, using a recipe he has made nearly every day - the exact same way - for the past 35 years. "I never ever, ever, ever changed or skimped on my recipe," he said. "I buy fresh products every day. I go to the market every day. One of my favorite sayings in life is, 'If it's not broke, don't fix it,' and that's how I managed to be successful so long. " In the beginning, Wilkins, 60, sold carrot cake in his West Philly store.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the thousands of Democratic conventioneers, SEPTA will spruce up the dilapidated subway and trolley stations and concourses beneath City Hall. However, the long-delayed, $150 million overhaul of the City Hall Station and 15th Street Station won't happen until after the crowds leave town, SEPTA officials said Thursday. The subways will get cosmetic improvements this summer, in time for Pope Francis' visit, and will be touched up again in 2016 before the Democrats arrive in July.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents won't have to look too hard to spot a county bus in Chester County from now on. They will just need to glance around for the splash of lime green in the middle of traffic. The two non-SEPTA bus lines that serve Chester County have been given a makeover and a new name, Chescobus, by the Transportation Management Association of Chester County (TMACC). The changes are an attempt to attract riders and make the four buses more identifiable in a part of the county where there are few mass-transit options.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Southwest Philadelphia man was arrested Wednesday in the attempted rape of a woman in SEPTA's Jefferson Station on Monday afternoon. Police say Reginald Green, 26, attacked the 27-year-old woman, whom he had met about a half-hour before the 1 p.m. assault in the station, formerly Market East. He was charged with attempted rape, aggravated indecent assault, aggravated assault, unlawful restraint, robbery, and related offenses. The woman, who police say is not from the area and did not know Green, met him near the station at 10th and Filbert Streets.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA managers and Regional Rail workers differed sharply Tuesday on the possible safety effects if SEPTA is permitted to avoid requirements of a federal rule designed to limit fatigue. SEPTA wants the Federal Railroad Administration to renew a waiver that the transit agency has had from the work rule for two years. At an FRA public hearing in Delaware County on Tuesday, engineers and conductors argued that a waiver would endanger passengers by forcing train crews to work with too little rest.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
MICHAEL, a Frankford teen, is a poster boy for all the wrong reasons. Last year, Michael - a pseudonym, because most of his offenses were committed as a juvenile - was cited 15 times in six months for hopping onto a SEPTA train without paying, law-enforcement sources said. It got so bad, one SEPTA Transit Police officer told the Daily News , that the cashiers at his most frequently visited stations began to recognize him and would tip off police before he even approached their windows.
NEWS
February 3, 2015
SEPTA police are investigating a group attack that allegedly occurred on a city trolley and was posted on YouTube. SEPTA's social media monitoring team discovered the video Sunday which was posted on a local blogger's site, and a detective was assigned, said SEPTA spokesman Manuel Smith. The video shows a group of young people, male and female, involved in an assault. Some of them appear to be kicking and stomping someone on the floor. One of the females is seen assaulting another passenger with her hands.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long-delayed, $150 million makeover of the busy subway complex beneath City Hall will begin early next year, a top SEPTA official said Wednesday. The century-old 15th Street station on the Market-Frankford Line and the 87-year-old City Hall station on the Broad Street line will be made roomier, brighter, and cleaner, and be equipped with 13 elevators to make them fully accessible. And the dark, narrow passageways that connect the stations and the Subway-Surface Lines will be reconfigured to eliminate stairs and bottlenecks.
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