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NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate judge set stringent bail conditions yesterday for a SEPTA police officer charged by New York authorities in a hostage-taking robbery allegedly orchestrated by Russian mobsters. Authorities allege that furs, jewelry and Rolex watches were taken during a home break-in in Brooklyn on May 13 and that the victims were later forced to pay an additional $40,000 in cash. The victims, identified only as the owners of a New York business, were gagged, handcuffed and had their faces covered with ski caps by two men who entered their home posing as police officers, according to a criminal complaint filed last week.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
Everybody's hoping for another Phillies parade next year, but fans shouldn't expect SEPTA to do the impossible - that is, carry hundreds of thousands of riders beyond its normal capacity. The disappointed baseball fans who were delayed and stranded on crowded train platforms last week were understandably frustrated and angry. But they really shouldn't have been surprised that a commuter rail system sized for 135,000 could not handle several times the ridership. No question, thousands tried to do the right thing by taking a train or bus to Center City and the stadium complex.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
NEWS
August 17, 1986
SEPTA Chairman Lewis F. Gould Jr. understandably is upset about the deletions made by Gov. Thornburgh in state funding for transit projects in Southeastern Pennsylvania before approving the capital budget enacted by the legislature. The governor "blue-lined" items for SEPTA totaling $36 million - more than half of the funds voted by the legislature. As Mr. Gould has noted in a letter to the governor, federal funds for transit capital projects require matching funds from the state.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
HOW CAN the Daily News say that the SEPTA service cuts make sense (editorial, April 2)? These cuts don't make sense. This is the beginning of the total dismantling of our transit system. These cuts will hurt our region's economy since it will be harder to attract new jobs and will only hasten the departure of companies who are considering leaving our area. As a supporter of Gov. Rendell, I ask him to address this issue of dedicated transit funding and fix this problem once and for all. It is sad that we continue to remain near the bottom of the list in the funding of the transit system our country.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA's board of directors approved a new contract Thursday for the agency's transit police. The police union, which staged a nine-day strike last month, ratified the contract April 5. Under the agreement, each of the 210 members of the Fraternal Order of Transit Police will receive a $1,250 bonus immediately and a 12 percent increase in pay over four years. The agreement also includes small increases in longevity pay and clothing allowances, and doubles the death benefit to $500,000 for any officer killed in the line of duty.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
An unidentified man was struck and killed by a SEPTA train in West Philadelphia Saturday afternoon in an apparent suicide, officials said. The man reportedly jumped in front of a Market-Frankford train around 3 p.m. at the 40th Street Station, said SEPTA spokesman Manny Smith. The train was heading eastbound from West Philadelphia to Center City and the Frankford Transportation Center, he said. Service was suspended to cut off power to the tracks and allow emergency officials to tend to the man, who was pronounced dead at the scene by the medical examiner.
NEWS
November 6, 2009
As I stood in line waiting for my train home for more than an hour Tuesday night, I debated whether the SEPTA union president had lost his mind, or whether I should get a job driving a bus. As the time passed and the guy behind me kept sneezing, I got more and more agitated at Willie Brown, the SEPTA union head who walked away from the bargaining table in the middle of the night, leaving thousands of riders in the lurch. Calling a strike without warning at 3 a.m. was dirty pool.
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NEWS
February 2, 2016 | BY DAN GERINGER, Staff Writer
A MAN WHO allegedly stabbed a SEPTA bus passenger in Frankford on Friday afternoon has surrendered to police, according to Northeast Detectives. Police had released a SEPTA bus video Saturday seeking help in finding the suspect, who had boarded a southbound Route 56 bus on Torresdale Avenue, was unable to pay the fare, and refused to leave. After the bus stopped on Torresdale Avenue near Paul Street, another passenger pushed the fare evader out of the bus, the video shows. A fight ensued on the street, during which the fare evader allegedly stabbed the other man several times.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police on Saturday released a video of a man they say stabbed another during a fight on a SEPTA bus in Frankford, and are seeking the public's help in finding the assailant. It was shortly before 2 p.m. Friday when the suspect got on a Route 56 bus, which was traveling south on Torresdale Avenue. The man was unable to pay his fare and was asked to leave the bus at the next stop, police said. When the man refused to leave, another man, who was a passenger on the bus, began to argue with him, police said.
NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Dana DiFilippo, Staff Writer
A man who died after a scuffle with a SEPTA police officer in October died of an overdose of PCP, the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office said Thursday. Omar Lopez, 24, of Kensington, died shortly after arriving at Aria Health-Frankford Campus on Oct. 26, where he was taken after the confrontation - in which he was Tased - at the Market-Frankford El's Huntingdon Station. Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the medical examiner, said the cause of death was acute phencyclidine (PCP) toxicity.
FOOD
January 29, 2016 | Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
When David Chan began keeping his Chinatown restaurant open into the wee hours in 1992, he knew of only a handful of other Center City eateries that did the same. The after-midnight scene was reserved for 24-hour diners, the cheesesteak giants in South Philly, and pizza by the slice. But steadily over the years, Philadelphia has become a late-night city, or at least a later-night one, with an increasing number of restaurants offering food and drink until midnight, and a number cooking until 2 a.m. The change is most clear at the city's core.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Update Tuesday 8 a.m.: 18 SEPTA bus routes remain out of service.   Almost two days after the last snowflakes fell, about one-fifth of Philadelphia's 122 bus routes remained suspended. By Monday afternoon, 26 routes were still out of service, largely due to unplowed streets, SEPTA officials said. "These operate in neighborhood areas, and to be able to bring a 40-foot bus down a street requires the street to be relatively cleared," said Manuel Smith, spokesman for the transportation authority.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | BY DAN GERINGER, Staff Writer
SEPTA General Manager Jeff Knueppel, who announced Monday that 75 percent of the blizzard-battered public-transit system was running again, said he was teased by a reporter earlier this winter after buying gigantic snow-fighting machines. The 28-year SEPTA veteran, who has battled the four biggest snowstorms in Philadelphia history, oversaw the purchase of a rail-riding, snow-throwing monster truck with a rotating arm that looks like something out of Mad Max: Fury Road . "It was the age-old situation where you buy a snowblower and there's a winter with no snow," Knueppel told the Daily News, laughing.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | Staff report
Patience is the key word for Monday's afternoon commute. SEPTA Regional Rail trains are operating again, but some have been canceled and others face delays. There also is no service past Malvern on the Paoli/Thorndale line due to frozen switches. About 70 percent of SEPTA's bus routes are operating but some must deal with detours. "Delays can be expected all day," SEPTA General Manager Jeff Knueppel said at a media briefing this morning. "This is a very fluid situation.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
SEPTA and two energy services firms announced Thursday they had teamed up to expand the first-of-its-kind battery storage system that captures power from braking trains on the city's two subway systems. Constellation Energy Resources, a Baltimore subsidiary of Exelon Corp., will pay for and install battery systems at seven SEPTA electrical substations on the transit system, which will capture and store power produced from the subway's regenerative brakes. Viridity Energy, a Philadelphia firm, will bid the stored power into the regional energy grid, which pays a fee to suppliers that can instantly match generation with demand to maintain the desired electrical frequency on the network.
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A month after a major scheduling overhaul on SEPTA's Regional Rail, riders at Elkins Park had plenty of stories at a meeting Wednesday about missed trains, missed stops, and continuing confusion. "This is a month after your rollout, and this is absolutely inexcusable," said Nomi Saunders of Elkins Park. Saunders, who writes historical fiction under the name Nomi Eve, teaches a fiction class at Drexel University, and has faced conflicting information about which train she should board to get home from 30th Street Station.
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