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NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA riders won't have to worry about the possibility of a transit strike for at least three weeks. Leaders of Transport Workers Union Local 234 said Friday that Philadelphia bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and maintenance workers will remain on the job despite the expiration at 12:01 a.m. Saturday of their labor contract. Suburban contracts expire during the first week of April, and "if a work stoppage becomes necessary," it will happen after those contracts expire, the TWU said in a statement.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JOANN JACKSON-SMITH, who has driven a SEPTA bus for three years, went to her first Transport Workers Local 234 strike vote yesterday, and brought her daughters Jasmin, 13, and Jenevieve, 11, to give them a living civics lesson. "When you stand together as a group and fight for what you believe in, you stand strong," Jackson-Smith said after more than 1,000 union members voted unanimously to authorize a strike if negotiations with SEPTA management break down. "I've never done anything like this before," Jackson-Smith said.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unhappy with the pace of contract negotiations, SEPTA police are warning of a possible strike. SEPTA officials have drawn up contingency plans for protecting passengers and SEPTA property in case of a strike, a spokeswoman said Monday. The Fraternal Order of Transit Police, which represents about 220 SEPTA officers, had a one-day walkout in 2008, the first ever by the police force. No new strike is imminent yet, as the police and SEPTA have agreed to talk again in March.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Market East Station, the 30-year-old subterranean commuter rail hub beneath Center City, will be renamed Jefferson Station in a multimillion-dollar deal between SEPTA and Jefferson Health System. SEPTA, Jefferson, and city officials will unveil new signs Thursday at a news conference in the station. The deal will mean millions of dollars for SEPTA and increased public exposure for Jefferson, whose Thomas Jefferson University Hospital complex is just two blocks south of the station.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The chances of a transit strike against SEPTA are "very good," union president Willie Brown said Wednesday. "My objective is not to get a strike, I don't look forward to a strike . . . but we're not going to sign a contract full of givebacks," said Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234, which represents about 5,500 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and mechanics. "I'm prepared for a long strike," Brown said in an interview. SEPTA and the union are far apart in negotiations, and no talks have been held since the contract for transit workers in Philadelphia expired March 15. Three other contracts for suburban bus drivers, mechanics, and clerical workers expire April 1 and April 7. The TWU said last week no strike would occur until after those contracts expire.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
New passenger buses ordered by SEPTA have been delayed by production problems, forcing the transit agency to continue operating old buses that are increasingly prone to mechanical breakdowns. The first of 275 new electric-diesel buses purchased for $202.6 million was delivered this week, SEPTA officials said Wednesday. The first bus is more than a year behind schedule. The vehicles are being built by Nova Bus, Inc., a subsidiary of Volvo Bus Corp., headquartered in Saint-Eustache, Quebec, Canada.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
I WOULD LIKE TO thank the Daily News for the help concerning my SEPTA issue ("Gripe from a bus rider," Jan. 30). The same day my letter was printed, director of customer service Rohan K. Hepkins called and stated he would look into the matter and apologized for the service and staff problem. Way to go, Daily News , for getting matters addressed. Maryann Zindell Philadelphia Take his word for it Re: "What Obama's up to" (letter, Jan. 29). Just want to give Tom Bell of Philadelphia a great round of applause for his comment.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Philadelphia-area commuters, the possibility of a first-ever transit strike by all SEPTA union workers could loom large when a federally mandated mediation process for Regional Rail engineers expires later this year. After that, the engineers, who have been working without a new contract since 2010, would be permitted to strike. SEPTA's labor contract with city bus drivers and subway operators has already expired, and contracts with suburban operators and mechanics will expire in early April.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WHEN an anti-Islamic group decided to advertise on city buses and billboards this fall with photos of a terrorist poised to behead an American and a Muslim leader smiling at Adolf Hitler, transit officials in New York and Washington, D.C., huffed their disapproval - but allowed the ads to run. They had no choice, they said, because the ads were protected under the First Amendment. SEPTA's officials disagreed and rejected the ads. But the group behind the ads - the American Freedom Defense Initiative - won't surrender quietly.
NEWS
April 2, 2003
SEPTA unveiled its budget yesterday, and it was no April Fool's joke. The transit service is now facing a deficit the size of a Philadelphia pothole: $55 million for the fiscal 2004 budget. The bad news shouldn't be a shock to anyone. The economic downturn that has affected private businesses is now being felt big time in the public sector. Now it's SEPTA's turn to squeal. To make up the shortfall, the transit service is considering cutbacks and fare increases. Much of it makes sense.
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