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NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Tricia Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just before Tuesday's deadly Amtrak derailment, both a SEPTA commuter train and another Amtrak train in the same corridor were hit by projectiles, one which crashed through the engineer's window. An Amtrak spokesman could not be reached regarding Amtrak Acela Train 2173, which passengers said was struck at about 9:05 p.m. A SEPTA train was struck by a projectile at about 9:10 p.m., according to a SEPTA spokeswoman, who said there is no indication the incident is connected to the derailment, which happened at about 9:30 p.m. Mayor Nutter, at a news conference Wednesday afternoon, reiterated that the incident with the SEPTA train had "nothing to do" with the derailment.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE WOMAN behind the wheel of a SEPTA bus that nearly hit a freight train in South Philly on Tuesday lost control when she fell out of her seat, as seen in footage released yesterday by the transit authority. The unidentified driver was not wearing her seat belt, a violation of SEPTA guidelines, according to spokeswoman Jerri Williams. "Had she had her seat belt on, the likelihood of this accident would have been greatly diminished," said Williams. The crash happened about 6:05 p.m., not long after the Route 29 bus left its station of origin near Pier 70 in South Philly.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
AFTER YEARS of talk by elected officials, city boosters and everyday citizens about how great it would be to have a green park on a portion of the abandoned Reading Railroad elevated viaduct, the idea appears to be on the fast track. City Council's Committee on Public Property and Public Works will hold a hearing Monday to discuss a bill introduced last week by Councilman Mark Squilla that would authorize the city to acquire 1/4-mile of the rail property now owned by SEPTA. "We think it's a great project, not only for the neighborhood but for the entire city," Squilla said yesterday.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
LAUREN FERRETT, a recent arrival to Philadelphia, has grown accustomed to seeing drivers make U-turns right in front of her. But when the Bella Vista resident drove south on Columbus Boulevard about 6:05 last night, she could not believe her eyes. A SEPTA bus made a left turn at Dickinson Street, but continued into a U-turn and ended on the train tracks that run down the middle of the boulevard - directly in front of an idle freight train. "I realized [the driver] wasn't making a U-turn onto the road but onto the train tracks, and the driver got stuck there," she said.
NEWS
May 7, 2015
Three people were injured during rush hour Tuesday when a SEPTA Route 29 bus ran over a concrete median in South Philadelphia, a SEPTA spokeswoman said. The accident happened at 6:05 when the bus, heading from Pier 70 encountered a freight train blocking the route at the intersection of Columbus Boulevard and Tasker Street. The impact busted out the windshields on the bus. "The train was stopped and there was no contact between the bus and the train," the spokeswoman said. "How the bus ended on the tracks is under investigation.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Looking for ways to save money, SEPTA has paid about $2.8 million to a Boston-based consulting firm, including payments of more than $500 an hour to some specialists. In the process, FTI Consulting Inc. has used 24 of its staffers, some of whom have collected more from SEPTA than the transit agency's highest-paid official, general manager Joseph Casey, who makes $273,000 a year. The meter is still running, with additional payments expected to continue through the end of the year.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE MAN DUBBED the "Mayfair Tire Slasher" pleaded guilty yesterday to causing trouble in his new neighborhood of Oxford Circle, where he and his wife moved. David Toledo, 47, a high-school dropout and former butcher, admitted placing a glue mousetrap with nails under a tire of a SEPTA employee's private car, in an attempt to puncture it, on Creston Street on the morning of Nov. 19. Assistant District Attorney Lauren McHale told Common Pleas Judge Edward Wright that a couple of days later, when Toledo gave police a statement, he first denied his involvement in the crime, then finally admitted it. He said "he did it to get another neighbor in trouble," she said.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Toledo's Mayfair neighbors fumed last May when a Philadelphia judge gave two years' probation to the man found by a jury to be the "Mayfair Tire Slasher. " After Tuesday's hearing, in which Toledo pleaded guilty to trying to flatten the tire of a SEPTA bus, he faced prison time. Prosecutors say the 47-year-old may also be the vandal who damaged other tires around the 1600 block of Creston Street in Oxford Circle. "He said he would toss screws and nails around while he was walking his dog," Assistant District Attorney Lauren McHale said, describing Toledo's statement to police after his Nov. 21 arrest, two days after the SEPTA incident.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
IT WAS EIGHT years ago this month that the Daily News branded 52nd and Market streets one of the city's most dangerous corners. "Death Row" screamed the front-page headline - one part tabloid hyperbole, one part depressing summation of the crime, blight and poverty that had choked the life out of the once-proud business and entertainment strip. Drug deals went down casually in broad daylight. Businesses collapsed, one after another, as a lengthy rebuild of SEPTA's Market-Frankford El turned the streets and sidewalks into a maze of construction equipment and debris.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of my sons, who rides SEPTA 's Subway- Surface Lines to work, wanted to know: "Why do all the trolleys have their own WiFi networks," each of them password-protected, and tantalizingly visible to connection-starved users as they stare at their mobile- network availability screens? He asked the operator, who hadn't a clue. "If they at least told the drivers the network passwords, they could maybe get some use out of them," my son said. "Why are the networks there? Why aren't they used?
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