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NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Kilcur, 62, a labor lawyer who had been a top official at SEPTA, died Wednesday, Feb. 19, of leukemia at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The West Chester resident worked at SEPTA for 16 years, serving as general counsel and acting general manager. He had been a partner at Saul Ewing since 1995, specializing in labor law and representing SEPTA management in labor negotiations. "He gave you good advice and was a very steadying influence," said Pasquale "Pat" Deon Sr., chairman of the SEPTA board.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA SEPTA may restore weekend late-night service on the Broad Street and Market-Frankford lines, agency officials said Thursday. Because of increasing nightlife and residential activity in Center City, SEPTA may continue service after midnight, when subways now are replaced by "night owl" buses, general manager Joseph Casey said. The service might continue until 3 a.m., officials said. Initially, it would be limited to Friday and Saturday nights, in a pilot program to test the response.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve people were hospitalized Monday in two crashes involving SEPTA's Route 84 bus line. In the first, 10 people were hospitalized after a minivan ran a red light in Frankford and crashed into two vehicles, including a bus, about 10 a.m., police said. The minivan was traveling north on Torresdale Avenue when it struck a vehicle traveling east on Bridge Street, Sgt. Joseph Rossa of the Accident Investigation District said. The impact pushed the minivan into a Route 84 bus. The bus driver was uninjured, and the bus suffered minor damage, Rossa said.
NEWS
February 19, 2014
Bus improvements Working within its budget, SEPTA is proactive in trying to find ways to improve capacity on heavily travelled transit routes ("SEPTA should resolve bus roulette," Feb. 14). In fact, eight of the 10 steps to improve bus riders' experience listed in Inga Saffron's recent Changing Skyline column are measures SEPTA is taking to address rush-hour crowding and chronic pass-ups. Many of these steps were employed during the Transit First pilot to improve on-time performance of Route 47 buses.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's Regional Rail lines were experiencing numerous delays and some cancellations Friday night because of crew shortages, an agency spokesman said. "We are confident we'll get people home," albeit with "significant delays," said Andrew Busch, the spokesman. "We have, unfortunately, some manpower issues, some crew shortages," Busch said. "We've had to cancel some trains. " What resulted was a "cascading effect" slowing down service "throughout the system," Busch said. No lines have been canceled for Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Loretta Tague, an administrative assistant who lives in the Graduate Hospital neighborhood, has a love-hate relationship with SEPTA's 17 bus. This is what she loves: Every five minutes at rush hour, a sleek hybrid roars up to the corner of 20th and Carpenter Streets and promises to speed her to Center City in less time than it takes to punch an e-mail into her phone. This is what she hates: All too often, the driver refuses to stop and let her board. On Monday, at 8:51 a.m., Tague, nearly in tears, sent her boss a text.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
1. Stop every other block. Philadelphia is America's only big city in which buses stop at every corner. That increases travel times considerably. Reducing stops would enable SEPTA to put an extra bus on every route, dramatically increasing frequency. 2. Give buses the green light. The Nutter administration just secured a $30 million federal grant to install wireless devices to hold the green traffic light for buses, reducing delays. Stopping at fewer red lights means buses can travel faster, restarting the route sooner.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER, who declared a snow emergency beginning at 8 last night, announced that the city government will shut down today. All nonessential employees have the day off, and the scheduled City Council meeting is canceled. The School District of Philadelphia and Archdiocesan schools are closed. "This is highly unusual weather," said Nutter, noting that the 43.4 inches of snow this winter is almost twice the normal accumulation at this point in the year. If the storm that began last night drops 6 inches on Philadelphia, Nutter said, it would be the fourth storm to reach that mark this year.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
KING OF PRUSSIA SEPTA planners have provided more details about the proposed rail extension to King of Prussia, including comparisons of a ground-level train instead of an elevated track along Route 202. In public comments this summer, some residents expressed concern about the aesthetics of an elevated rail line along Route 202, said Byron Comati, SEPTA planning director. "We're trying to be very responsive," he said at a meeting Thursday at the Radisson Hotel at Valley Forge. "We're not going to pass judgment yet and say this is a better way. . . . But it comes with, unfortunately, a slew of other issues.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
MAUREEN DALY, a SEPTA passenger-services representative, put it best: This is a Philadelphia story, a little tale to help restore our sometimes shaky faith in our fellow Philadelphian. So here it goes: The snow was coming down hard by the time Kit Thomas got to 30th Street Station late on Jan. 2 for his annual visit to Philly from Hawaii. Outside, a friend who was also from the islands, picked him up and asked him to drive. Before they drove off, Thomas got out of the car to wipe the ice from the windshield wipers and then the two friends white-knuckled it to a relative's house in Haverford.
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