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NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
A SEPTA transit police officer caught on a bystander's video throwing a man to the ground June 4 has been investigated and disciplined, but will remain on the force, SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel III said Friday. Matthew Sinkiewicz, who Nestel said has been an officer with the department for about a year, can be seen in the minute-long clip ordering Anthony Barlow to sit down at SEPTA's Frankford Transportation Center. After Barlow verbally declines to sit several times, Sinkiewicz grabs him and forces him to the ground.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
The name for Fifth Street's subway stop got longer but more descriptive at a ceremony Thursday. The Market-Frankford Line stop is now called Fifth Street Independence Hall Station. The change highlights the stop as a gateway to some of Philadelphia's most famous landmarks and makes using the subway easier for tourists unfamiliar with the city, officials said. "Naming this station will make public transit even more embedded in our city," said Mayor Kenney. SEPTA will be updating its station maps to reflect the change in the near future, said Jeff Knueppel, the authority's general manager.
NEWS
June 28, 2016
Six SEPTA Regional Rail lines were suspended for about an hour Sunday afternoon because of an issue at the agency's Wayne Junction power station, officials said. The signal system and the overhead power lines that power the trains were down due to a "temporary equipment failure" at the substation, which powers the northern half of the regional rail system, said Andrew Busch, a SEPTA spokesman. Busch did not know exactly what caused the problem, but he said the facility dates back to the 1930s.
NEWS
June 25, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN ENERGY SEPTA, go sustainable As a steering committee member with 350 Philadelphia, a climate-change group that opposes the building of a natural gas plant in Nicetown, I would like to clarify several points made in Monday's article "Power struggle. " Natural gas is not "clean-burning. " It releases about half the carbon dioxide of coal, which is considered by many to be the dirtiest fuel. Nicetown residents are right to be concerned about their health. Burning natural gas releases nitrogen oxides - precursors to smog - and has been linked in some preliminary studies to worsening lung diseases such as asthma.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Asbury, N.J.-based builders J.G. Petrucci Co. plan to officially start work Wednesday on an eight-building, 151-unit apartment complex across the street from SEPTA's Warminster regional rail station. The development, to be called Jacksonville Station, is expected to open in Spring 2017, the company said in a release. J.G. Petrucci also built the nearby Station at Bucks County residential complex, a 257-unit project that opened in 2012. jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
BUSINESS
June 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
In another era, SEPTA's proposal to build a power plant in an industrial complex near its Wayne Junction station might have attracted little attention. SEPTA says the project, which would power most of the transit agency's northern Regional Rail system, will keep its trains running in case of a Peco blackout. It also says the $26.8 million plant will save money, and require no outlay for the cash-strapped agency. But SEPTA's proposed power plant would be fueled by natural gas, which despite its clean-burning attributes has become a lightning rod for anti-fossil-fuel activists.
NEWS
June 16, 2016
A 76-year-old woman who was struck by a SEPTA bus in the city's Chestnut Hill section Thursday has died, police said Tuesday. Police identified the woman as Elizabeth O'Malley, 76, of the 800 block of East Horton Street in West Philadelphia. She died at 5:05 p.m. Saturday at Einstein Medical Center, police said. It was about 4:20 p.m. Thursday when the Route L bus traveling south on Germantown Avenue made a left onto Gravers Lane and hit O'Malley and a 50-year-old woman, who were walking in a crosswalk.
NEWS
June 15, 2016
SEPTA's new fare card went on sale Monday morning. SEPTA Key, the electronic fare card that will eventually replace passes and tokens on the region's public transportation network, is being made available to 10,000 people on a first-come, first-served basis. Cash, tokens, and - for the first time on SEPTA's system - credit cards can be used on kiosks to buy the new cards. These kiosks are in six stops on the Market Frankford Line and six stops on the Broad Street Line. Once you have the card, though, you can "reload" it like an E-ZPass - setting up an account online, or over the phone, and adding to it as needed.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
For those who were among the first to buy SEPTA's new smart fare card Monday morning, the sheer novelty was a big part of the draw. "I just wanted to get a daily [pass] to see what it was like," said Dennis Grimes, of Philadelphia, who passed through Dilworth Plaza Station on his way to work at a Center City health-care company. At 6 a.m., when SEPTA's yellow-vested ambassadors arrived at the two silver kiosks in the station to help customers with the new SEPTA Key fare system, people were already waiting.
NEWS
June 11, 2016
Two women were hospitalized after they were hit by a SEPTA bus Thursday afternoon in the city's Chestnut Hill section, an agency spokesman said. The Route L bus was traveling on Germantown Avenue at Gravers Lane when it hit the women about 4:20 p.m., said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. The women were transported to Einstein Medical Center. Their injuries did not appear to be life-threatening, Busch said. The cause of the accident was under investigation. - Robert Moran
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