CollectionsSepta
IN THE NEWS

Septa

NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Ten thousand thousand fruit to touch," as Robert Frost puts it in "After Apple-Picking. " He was talking about apples. But Apple-picking is now slang for the theft of one of the most lucrative things you can steal: a cellphone. And Philadelphia, according to the AAA, is the number-one town in the United States for Apple-picking. Now, after industrial dickering and resistance, consumers may finally get some control of the situation. At issue is the so-called kill switch, a way for owners of stolen or lost mobile devices to lock them and/or erase info on them remotely.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
Introduced by an article in the Atlantic more than three decades ago and embraced in New York a few years later, the "broken windows" theory isn't cutting-edge criminology. But the SEPTA police force's much more recent adoption of the approach is as auspicious as it is belated. The theory holds that tolerance of minor crimes such as vandalism contributes to more general and serious disorder. Cracking down on petty violations should therefore pay public-safety dividends that go beyond the nuisances themselves.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I BOARDED the SEPTA Route 23 bus yesterday morning expecting a freak show. Judging by the photos and videos posted on People of SEPTA and similar voyeuristic online sites, I awaited the ill-clothed masses, the nodding addicts and the midmorning masturbators. A Temple University doctoral student captured an especially brazen whack job (pun intended) on video Friday morning when the man sitting next to her on the same bus route I took a few days later began to masturbate. That video went viral, and will make for some compelling evidence when cops pick up the perv.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After rising for a decade, violent and property crimes dropped on SEPTA subway and elevated lines last year, as fare-evasion arrests skyrocketed. SEPTA Police Chief Thomas J. Nestel III credited a change in police tactics: more officers in the subways, a crackdown on minor crimes, and a focus on fare jumpers. In 2013, there were 464 reported violent and property crimes on the Broad Street subway and the Market-Frankford elevated/subway line, down 14 percent from 541 in 2012. Violent and property crimes include murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, theft, and arson.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's Regional Rail engineers moved a step closer to being able to strike early next year, after the National Mediation Board on Thursday ended its efforts to broker an agreement. The board on Thursday declared an impasse in negotiations and suggested the two sides submit their long-running dispute to binding arbitration. The 220 engineers, represented by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen, said they would accept arbitration, but SEPTA will not, spokeswoman Jerri Williams said.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A WOMAN WAS fighting for her life last night after tumbling onto the tracks of SEPTA's Broad Street Line. That woman, a South Philly resident whose age and identity weren't available, remained in critical condition at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital last night after her right leg touched the "third rail," the electrified portion of the train track. An estimated 600 volts coursed through her body during the incident, which happened at 1:18 p.m. at the line's Ellsworth-Federal stop, according to SEPTA Transit Police Chief Thomas Nestel.
NEWS
April 27, 2014
A story Friday about a SEPTA advertising contract misstated the length of the option periods at the end of the contract. The two option periods are two years each.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA A Southwest Philadelphia auto mechanic who admitted killing a SEPTA trolley driver on orders of the driver's jilted girlfriend was sentenced Wednesday to 30 to 60 years in prison. Miguel Gonzalez, 39, said nothing before Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Benjamin Lerner sentenced him in the May 31, 2012, shooting of Aaron Hayes Sr. The sentence was negotiated by Assistant District Attorney Gail Fairman and defense attorneys Susan Ricci and Francis Carmen as part of Gonzalez's guilty plea to third-degree murder and conspiracy.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
THE HIT MAN hired to kill a SEPTA trolley operator in front of the victim's Southwest Philadelphia home on May 31, 2012, pleaded guilty to third-degree murder yesterday. Under the terms of a negotiated plea, Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner immediately sentenced Akai Thuong McRee-Tran to 30-to-60 years in state prison for the murder of Aaron Hayes Sr., 52. McRee-Tran, 49, who was arrested last August under the alias Miguel Gonzalez, declined to make a statement prior to sentencing.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|