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Septic Shock

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BUSINESS
October 2, 1989 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The infection last year killed young actress Heather O'Rourke, who terrified moviegoers with her unforgettable "they're heeeere!" in Poltergeist. It also contributed to the July death of Steve Rubell, who presided over the '70s New York disco scene as co-owner of Studio 54. They died of a broadly labeled syndrome known as septic shock. The most prevalent type of this malady claims about 80,000 American lives a year - about 60,000 less than died of lung cancer last year and nearly 20,000 more than have succumbed to AIDS since the epidemic began.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Bob Calandra, For The Inquirer
Dying is effortless. That became clear to me as I lay on a gurney in an emergency department bay at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. It was 10 p.m., almost five hours since my primary-care physician Michael Cirigliano (better known as Dr. Mike from Fox29) diagnosed me as septic, bundled me into his car, and rushed me to the hospital. After several hours of intravenous antibiotics and four liters of fluid, my blood pressure was crashing, a hallmark of sepsis, a potentially fatal condition caused by an exaggerated immune response to injury or infection.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Centocor Inc. said yesterday that it had received approval to resume limited human testing of its drug Centoxin in pediatric patients suffering from meningitis. The clinical trial will include a small group of patients 18 and younger who are suffering from fulminant meningococcemia, a bacterial infection that is a common cause of meningitis. A much larger trial, for patients suffering from the blood infection that causes sepsis and septic shock, has been suspended since last Monday.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The holidays came both early and late for 13-year-old Bill Chase. The Cinnaminson Middle School student landed in the hospital on Christmas morning, suffering from sepsis, an often-fatal condition that caused his heart and lungs to fail. He has another week or so before he can return home and open the presents that still lie waiting for him underneath the tree. But yesterday, Bill's seventh-grade class brought a small celebration to the rehabilitation center where he is recovering.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1991 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Malvern firm's experimental drug has been shown to significantly reduce deaths caused by a bacterial infection so severe it kills as many as 60 percent of those who contract it, according to a clinical study published today. The drug, known as Centoxin, reduced by 39 percent the number of deaths attributed to a blood infection known as gram-negative sepsis, according to a team of researchers writing in the New England Journal of Medicine. For those patients who went into septic shock - a complication that kills as many as 75 percent of its victims - the drug reduced mortality by 42 percent.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
When 2 1/2-year-old Steven Selfridge was horribly mauled by six Rottweilers at his grandmother's home north of Pittsburgh, he hovered near death for days. The dogs had inflicted hundreds of wounds and dragged the child through mud, dirt, grass and gravel. Despite the efforts of doctors at Allegheny General Hospital, known for its top-rated trauma unit, antibiotics simply could not keep up with the speed and variety of infections ravaging the boy. A few days after the attack, his body invaded by all manner of bacteria, Steven sank into septic shock, a frequently fatal complication.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
Europe has become the first continent to recommend the marketing of Centoxin, a new drug developed by a small company in Malvern that significantly reduces deaths caused by a lethal bacterial infection. Centoxin would be the first drug actually cloned from a natural antibody found in human tissue to be commercially available as a therapeutic drug. And its Malvern maker, Centocor Inc. - which has retained all the rights to Centoxin - would become the first biotech company to manufacture and market its own product, the company said.
NEWS
November 26, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Prafulla N. Joglekar, 62, of Elkins Park, a La Salle University teacher for four decades, died of septic shock Monday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Dr. Joglekar was chairman of the management department at La Salle on three occasions, a spokeswoman said, most recently from 2005 until earlier this year. At the time of his death, Dr. Joglekar was the Lindback Distinguished Professor of Operations Management at La Salle. He founded the Applied Research Center in La Salle's School of Business in 1979, the spokeswoman said, and served as its director until 1985.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1992 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a blow that sent its stock reeling, Centocor Inc. said yesterday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had asked new questions about the drug Centoxin, further delaying its marketing approval. The FDA told Centocor there was "insufficient evidence" so far that Centoxin was effective and asked for "additional clinical data" on the drug, used to treat a deadly bacterial infection. The FDA did not reject the application or ask that it be withdrawn, according to the company.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1990 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although a long-awaited study showed yesterday that one of Centocor's critical drugs significantly aids treatment of an infection that claims about 80,000 lives a year, the drug, Centoxin, received a lukewarm reception from Wall Street investors. The Malvern biotechnology firm's stock dipped by $1.25 to $30.25 a share in over-the-counter trading yesterday because, financial analysts said, the results of the study did not overwhelm investors, who apparently had anticipated an even better report.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Bob Calandra, For The Inquirer
Dying is effortless. That became clear to me as I lay on a gurney in an emergency department bay at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. It was 10 p.m., almost five hours since my primary-care physician Michael Cirigliano (better known as Dr. Mike from Fox29) diagnosed me as septic, bundled me into his car, and rushed me to the hospital. After several hours of intravenous antibiotics and four liters of fluid, my blood pressure was crashing, a hallmark of sepsis, a potentially fatal condition caused by an exaggerated immune response to injury or infection.
NEWS
November 26, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Prafulla N. Joglekar, 62, of Elkins Park, a La Salle University teacher for four decades, died of septic shock Monday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Dr. Joglekar was chairman of the management department at La Salle on three occasions, a spokeswoman said, most recently from 2005 until earlier this year. At the time of his death, Dr. Joglekar was the Lindback Distinguished Professor of Operations Management at La Salle. He founded the Applied Research Center in La Salle's School of Business in 1979, the spokeswoman said, and served as its director until 1985.
NEWS
April 4, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian and Patricia Montemurri INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
History's most visible pope in life became its most viewed pope in death yesterday as the Vatican's television network broadcast striking images of John Paul II's body lying in state during a private ceremony for Italian and church dignitaries in the Apostolic Palace. Earlier, an estimated 130,000 people had gathered on the balmy spring morning in St. Peter's Square as the Vatican's secretary of state, Cardinal Angelo Sodano, led a requiem Mass rich in references to the life and message of the Pope, who died Saturday evening at age 84. "Today, while crying about the passing of the Pope who has left us, we are opening our hearts to the vision of our eternal destiny," Sodano said.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The holidays came both early and late for 13-year-old Bill Chase. The Cinnaminson Middle School student landed in the hospital on Christmas morning, suffering from sepsis, an often-fatal condition that caused his heart and lungs to fail. He has another week or so before he can return home and open the presents that still lie waiting for him underneath the tree. But yesterday, Bill's seventh-grade class brought a small celebration to the rehabilitation center where he is recovering.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1993 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Patient A caught a bullet in the belly as he tried to rob an off-duty police officer. Patient B, a young alcoholic, was stricken with pneumonia, probably after inhaling his own vomit as he lay in a drunken stupor. And Patient C, an elderly car-crash victim, had suffered severe head and internal injuries. The ailments of these men might not seem to have much in common. But when they recently were admitted to surgical intensive care at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, all three were deemed at risk of contracting a bacterial infection severe enough to kill - an infection that results in blood poisoning known as sepsis.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Centocor Inc. said yesterday that it had received approval to resume limited human testing of its drug Centoxin in pediatric patients suffering from meningitis. The clinical trial will include a small group of patients 18 and younger who are suffering from fulminant meningococcemia, a bacterial infection that is a common cause of meningitis. A much larger trial, for patients suffering from the blood infection that causes sepsis and septic shock, has been suspended since last Monday.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1992 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a blow that sent its stock reeling, Centocor Inc. said yesterday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had asked new questions about the drug Centoxin, further delaying its marketing approval. The FDA told Centocor there was "insufficient evidence" so far that Centoxin was effective and asked for "additional clinical data" on the drug, used to treat a deadly bacterial infection. The FDA did not reject the application or ask that it be withdrawn, according to the company.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1991 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Centoxin, the breakthrough drug created by a Malvern biotechnology firm that could save thousands of lives threatened by potentially lethal bacterial infections, received the recommendation of a key Food and Drug Administration committee yesterday. Committee members found that the drug, developed by Centocor Inc., seemed to be safe and effective. However, they raised several questions, including whether Centocor's animal tests could predict how the drug would work in humans and when during the infection the drug should be administered.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
Europe has become the first continent to recommend the marketing of Centoxin, a new drug developed by a small company in Malvern that significantly reduces deaths caused by a lethal bacterial infection. Centoxin would be the first drug actually cloned from a natural antibody found in human tissue to be commercially available as a therapeutic drug. And its Malvern maker, Centocor Inc. - which has retained all the rights to Centoxin - would become the first biotech company to manufacture and market its own product, the company said.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1991 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Malvern firm's experimental drug has been shown to significantly reduce deaths caused by a bacterial infection so severe it kills as many as 60 percent of those who contract it, according to a clinical study published today. The drug, known as Centoxin, reduced by 39 percent the number of deaths attributed to a blood infection known as gram-negative sepsis, according to a team of researchers writing in the New England Journal of Medicine. For those patients who went into septic shock - a complication that kills as many as 75 percent of its victims - the drug reduced mortality by 42 percent.
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