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Serenity

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NEWS
January 13, 2005 | By Marcianne Waters
I went grocery shopping today for the bazillionth time since that magical day when I became, as even the IRS terms it, "head of household. " It was the usual - skim milk, designer eggs, and that toxin formerly known as white bread - until I came upon Aisle 9: cleansers. Aisle 9. It looked like an ordinary aisle. In fact, it looked a lot like Aisle 8. But it wasn't. Aisle 9 opened my eyes to a whole new world. If memory serves me, my experience was remarkably close to that of characters in that old high school reading requirement, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
The sun is shining gloriously outside, but you're stuck inside at your desk with your boss breathing hot air down your neck. Worse yet, your next vacation isn't until July. More succinctly, work stinks and you can't wait to exhale. What should you do to keep from going around the bend? Take a break. On a weekend, during your lunch hour. Choose a place that's close by, but make sure it's serene. Experts say seeking serenity is not only pleasurable, but downright healthy. "Taking a break from routine or taking time to get away to a peaceful place can be beneficial in reducing stress," said Dr. Reina Marino, a radiologist and author of numerous articles on stress management.
NEWS
October 5, 2003 | By Judi Dash FOR THE INQUIRER
On a sunny day at sea, with the ocean smooth as glass, the Deck 12 swimming pool glistening warm and blue, and dozens of chaises laid out in neat rows with soft cotton towels at each foot, a lone sunbather accepted an iced tea with parasol from a passing waiter. That sunbather would be me. Everyone else was in class. That's the big tug aboard Crystal Cruises' new 1,080-passenger Serenity, where lazing and learning constantly compete for guests' attention, and, unlike on most ships, a dazzling day at sea does not necessarily produce a full house around the pool.
NEWS
November 5, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a veteran European traveler, Charlie Dagit has toured every kind of sacred space there is in that part of the world. But in 1992, when he visited the gardens of Kyoto and other Japanese cities, he experienced something deeper than anything he'd ever felt in a cathedral or mosque. "There was a spirit of sacredness and serenity and oneness with nature," he says. Adds Alice Dagit, who accompanied her architect husband on that inspiring trip, "It captured your heart and soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Creative , energetic , confident , and fashionable are words frequently used to describe Serenity. The 12-year-old delights in always looking her best. Very neat, she takes great pride in keeping her belongings in good condition. Serenity's favorite pastimes include singing in her church choir, cheerleading, and playing the flute. She also enjoys writing stories and creating funny videos. Very sweet and personable, Serenity has the ability to make a positive impact on the people closest to her. Enrolled in fifth grade, Serenity receives special-education services and has made significant progress academically and behaviorally as a result of the small class size and individual attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Ah, the traumas of teendom: fashion dilemmas, a bossy older brother, invasive mind manipulation by megalomaniacal government scientists. What's a 17-year-old girl with ESP and the ability to chop-and-sock her way through an army of cannibalistic cretins going to do? In Serenity, Josh Whedon's kicky mix of space-movie mayhem and cowboy-movie corn, River Tam (Summer Glau) is a "reader" whose eerie premonitions of intergalactic apocalypse - not to mention her ability to know what other people are thinking - make her a wanted woman.
NEWS
February 20, 2004 | By Amy Lipson
Amid the suburban landscape of Riverside in Burlington County, there is, indeed, serenity. It began as a do-it-yourself project, initiated by my friends, Debbie and Sean, who were motivated to create a placid setting devoid of chaos and the concerns of the world surrounding them. Captivated by the mountains in West Almond, N.Y., which are a frequent camping destination for this family, myself included, Debbie and Sean created a backyard that brought back the sounds and smells of camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
One of its works was dedicated to the late conductor William Smith, but all the pieces in the Choral Arts Society's season finale Friday were somehow funereal and somber enough to make the concert a penitential rite. Conductor Sean Deibler had programmed Howard Hanson's 1974 piece, Lumen in Christo, and his early Cherubic Hymn. Ralph Vaughan Williams' Dona Nobis Pacem, settings of Walt Whitman war poems and biblical texts that decry death in hope of peace, was the work dedicated to Smith.
NEWS
December 15, 2004
A loss for all The decision by Montgomery County Orphans' Court Judge Stanley Ott permitting the Barnes Foundation to move its main galleries is sad, bad news - a loss for all, not just the art world, because the collection as it is can neither be duplicated nor improved upon. Prominent art critics, former students and many others agree on this point and believe the Barnes in Merion could have prospered under new leadership. There were other options available to the judge that he elected not to pursue, including appointing a special master over the board and vacating the current board.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | By Gerald McOscar
Someone much wiser than I once said that to use another person as a means to an end is the worst sin of all. I would suggest that the improper use of another is a workable definition of all sin - great and small. Unfortunately, much of what passes for virtue these days is anything but. Most people would agree that crimes like murder, rape, robbery and assault are not only illegal, but morally wrong - in a word, sinful. However, few sins are considered immoral or illegal these days.
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TRAVEL
March 10, 2014 | By Amy Laughinghouse, For The Inquirer
ABOARD THE CRYSTAL SERENITY - I'm sitting beside a pool in the Bay of Biscay, sipping a gin and tonic as a Thai band plays a vigorous rendition of Van Halen's "Jump. " A life-sized Barbie in a black-fringed thong bikini has just lowered herself into the water, no doubt inducing heart palpitations and several cases of whiplash among the men relaxing on the Lido Deck around me. That might seem to be sufficient excitement for one afternoon, but all eyes are directed upward when a crimson helicopter appears overhead, dangling two black-clad men from cables.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Creative , energetic , confident , and fashionable are words frequently used to describe Serenity. The 12-year-old delights in always looking her best. Very neat, she takes great pride in keeping her belongings in good condition. Serenity's favorite pastimes include singing in her church choir, cheerleading, and playing the flute. She also enjoys writing stories and creating funny videos. Very sweet and personable, Serenity has the ability to make a positive impact on the people closest to her. Enrolled in fifth grade, Serenity receives special-education services and has made significant progress academically and behaviorally as a result of the small class size and individual attention.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
The obligations of religious toleration and pluralism require all who care not a bit about baseball to accept that Opening Day is more than the beginning of a sports season. It is a great religious festival. It can't be an accident that baseball always starts around the time of both Easter and Passover and thus "elicits a sense of renewal. " For the faithful, it means that "the long dark nights of winter are over" and "the slate is clean. " All teams, the exalted and lowly alike, "are tied at zero wins and zero losses.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Never mind drawing a straight line. Kathleen Becker was having trouble with her curvy ones. Becker, 60, an office manager from Northeast Philadelphia, bent over a coaster-sized square of paper, laboring to make a series of gentle arcs that would, when finished, resemble the underside of a woven basket. "I just did it wrong again!" she lamented, squinting at her inked lines. "I keep doing it backward. " "No, you're not," said Katy Abbott, the instructor of that evening's Zentangle class.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Felicia Fonseca, Associated Press
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. - Generations of Navajo families have grazed livestock on a remote but spectacular mesa that overlooks the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers. This is the East Rim of the majestic Grand Canyon - the last with no significant development. But ancestral tradition and the tranquillity of the landscape could be subject to change if the Navajo government's plans are realized for a resort and aerial tramway that would ferry tourists from cliff tops to water's edge.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
A Novel By Louis Begley Alfred A. Knopf. 352 pp. $25.95 Reviewed by Glenn C. Altschuler For better and worse, Albert Schmidt is old school. Like his creator, he is a Harvard man and a corporate lawyer. Schmidt is a gentleman, a sophisticate, a square, a swine, and an anti-Semite. He cannot remember saying no to any woman who offered herself to him, "except perhaps the flirtatious propositions of old hags in the Hamptons, widows or writers or editors. " He is a truth-teller, who can be as tough on himself as he is on others.
TRAVEL
July 3, 2011 | By Karen Strawhacker, For The Inquirer
When my yoga studio in Skippack offered a yoga retreat to Hawaii, my first reaction was: Do it ! Then came the argument with myself: What about obligations to family and work, and could I do all that yoga - I'm 54 years old? Ah, the monkey mind at work - have I learned nothing in six years of practicing yoga? So off I went. Kalani Oceanside Retreat is on the eastern side of the island of Hawaii in Pahoa. It is nestled in lush greenery on a coastal road between lava fields and the Pacific Ocean.
NEWS
November 5, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a veteran European traveler, Charlie Dagit has toured every kind of sacred space there is in that part of the world. But in 1992, when he visited the gardens of Kyoto and other Japanese cities, he experienced something deeper than anything he'd ever felt in a cathedral or mosque. "There was a spirit of sacredness and serenity and oneness with nature," he says. Adds Alice Dagit, who accompanied her architect husband on that inspiring trip, "It captured your heart and soul.
NEWS
November 3, 2010 | By Rachel Gouk, Inquirer Staff Writer
She took each step carefully, circling and turning along the labyrinth's path, her long dungaree skirt sweeping at her heels. It was secluded behind St. Asaph's Church - quiet, with no cars, no highways. And that's when Jill Horn, 68, said it happened, what she calls a "past life experience. " While walking the path at the Bala Cynwyd church, she felt her posture involuntarily straighten and her shoulders push back. She felt like a teenager, she said. And then - in the hushed solitude behind the churchyard's stone walls - she heard the noises of an outdoor market, what she thought sounded like "merry old England.
LIVING
March 19, 2010 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The desk is huge, handsome, and perfectly, absolutely clear. Not a single stray paper, not a file, not even a pen rests on it. Yet this desk is in the working home office of an extremely busy man. Leon Huff admits it - he's a neat freak, and it shows in his elegant Moorestown home, a place so immaculate it's hard to imagine anyone even lives in it. The music producer and his wife, Regina, have created a world of striking furnishings, color...
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