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Sergey Brin

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BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. is opening a virtual window into the secretive data centers where an intricate maze of computers process Internet search requests, show YouTube video clips, and distribute e-mail for millions of people. The unprecedented peek is being provided through a new website unveiled Wednesday at http://tinyurl.com/bnbcy8j . The site features photos from inside some of the eight data centers that Google already has running in the United States, Finland, and Belgium.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a bumpy ride, but when Google Inc. finally made it to the stock market last week, investors cast aside doubts and drove the company's shares up 26 percent in the first two days of trading. After being priced at $85 a share Wednesday night - far below the company's initial projection of $108 to $135 a share - the stock opened at $100.01 on Thursday and shot up to close at $108.31 Friday in Nasdaq trading. Analysts said the problems that had plagued Google since it applied to become a publicly traded company in April had vanished - at least temporarily - in the minds of investors once the stock actually began trading: It jumped 18 percent above its IPO price on its very first trade.
NEWS
January 1, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From a collective of totally cool geek outlaws to corporate monster? Internet behemoth Google has bought Hollywood. Well, not quite. Company cofounders Sergey Brin and Larry Page, who are worth $11 billion each, are opening a slim mineshaft in the film industry by financing a friend's indie feature. Writer-director Reid Gershbein's flick, Broken Arrows, is about a man who becomes a professional killer after his pregnant wife dies in a terrorist attack. Gershbein befriended the Google dudes when they were doctoral students in computer science at Stanford University.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Google Inc. executives provided investment analysts with a bright outlook yesterday in a display of confidence that appeared aimed at defusing concerns about the company's growth. Chief executive officer Eric Schmidt said he saw no limit to the Internet search engine's ability to develop better advertising formulas, in turn generating more of the commissions that account for most of its profit. Schmidt underscored his optimism at one point by saying Google someday might reach $100 billion in annual revenue as it expanded into a variety of new advertising channels, including television, radio and publishing.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
Having grown too large to remain private under the law, Google, the search engine company, filed an initial public offering on Saturday. Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Google's founders, preface their filing with a document titled "Letter from the Founders: An Owner's Manual for Google's Shareholders. " It's a remarkable piece, warning of a long, strange trip ahead, and also warning investors to be in for the long haul or not get in at all. The letter, excerpted below, shows that Google is pretty reluctant to do it Wall Street's way. Google is not a conventional company.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares of online search company Google Inc. rose 18 percent to close at $100.34 yesterday, a first-day "pop" that still left questions about whether the company's initial public offering could be considered a success. The closing price was "still lower than the original IPO price" that Google had initially predicted, noted John Tinker, managing director of ThinkEquity Partners L.L.C., a research and investment-banking company in San Francisco. "If it's not a failure, it clearly didn't work the way Google's management intended it," said Barry Randall, portfolio manager for the First American Technology Fund.
NEWS
August 19, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Internet phenomenon Google Inc. can finally become a publicly traded company today, after it weathered an arduous four-month waiting period marked by bad timing, an apparent lack of investor interest, and possible securities violations. The Securities and Exchange Commission granted the company approval yesterday to proceed with its initial public offering. When they begin trading, shares in Google - which operates the Internet's most popular search engine - will bear the ticker symbol GOOG.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2011
THE GIZMO: Digging "In the Plex," Steven Levy's new book on "How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives" (Simon & Schuster, $26). MAGIC MAKERS: The wizards of Silicon Valley often hype their hardware/software breakthroughs as "magical" for the products' ability to pull off dazzling stunts in the blink of an eye. And true to the magicians' code, these tech talents rarely let mere mortals peer behind the curtains. That's what makes Levy's just-out tome so valuable.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2011 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. cofounder Larry Page is known for his vision, passion, and intelligence. Yet there is concern that his other known traits - aloofness, a rebellious streak, and an affinity for pursuing wacky ideas - might lead the company astray. Page takes over as chief executive officer Monday as fast-rising rivals and tougher regulators threaten Google's growth. Investors used to Google's consistency in exceeding financial targets worry that new leadership will bring more emphasis on long-term projects that take years to pay off. And many people are not sure he has enough management skills to steer the Internet's most powerful company.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
By Edward Glaeser 'We built it. " That was the Republicans' rebuke during their convention to President Obama's "you didn't build that. " These phrases don't imply anything about concrete policy. Yet the debate reflects a deep ideological divide that goes back 150 years. And the battle over the relative roles of social collaboration and individual initiative is not limited to the United States. The president's defenders claim Republicans took his words out of context. But the transcript shows that Obama's comments, taken as a whole, are a coherent statement of a communitarian worldview that emphasizes the power of social influences and the positive role of government.
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BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. is opening a virtual window into the secretive data centers where an intricate maze of computers process Internet search requests, show YouTube video clips, and distribute e-mail for millions of people. The unprecedented peek is being provided through a new website unveiled Wednesday at http://tinyurl.com/bnbcy8j . The site features photos from inside some of the eight data centers that Google already has running in the United States, Finland, and Belgium.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
By Edward Glaeser 'We built it. " That was the Republicans' rebuke during their convention to President Obama's "you didn't build that. " These phrases don't imply anything about concrete policy. Yet the debate reflects a deep ideological divide that goes back 150 years. And the battle over the relative roles of social collaboration and individual initiative is not limited to the United States. The president's defenders claim Republicans took his words out of context. But the transcript shows that Obama's comments, taken as a whole, are a coherent statement of a communitarian worldview that emphasizes the power of social influences and the positive role of government.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2011
THE GIZMO: Digging "In the Plex," Steven Levy's new book on "How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives" (Simon & Schuster, $26). MAGIC MAKERS: The wizards of Silicon Valley often hype their hardware/software breakthroughs as "magical" for the products' ability to pull off dazzling stunts in the blink of an eye. And true to the magicians' code, these tech talents rarely let mere mortals peer behind the curtains. That's what makes Levy's just-out tome so valuable.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2011 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Google Inc. cofounder Larry Page is known for his vision, passion, and intelligence. Yet there is concern that his other known traits - aloofness, a rebellious streak, and an affinity for pursuing wacky ideas - might lead the company astray. Page takes over as chief executive officer Monday as fast-rising rivals and tougher regulators threaten Google's growth. Investors used to Google's consistency in exceeding financial targets worry that new leadership will bring more emphasis on long-term projects that take years to pay off. And many people are not sure he has enough management skills to steer the Internet's most powerful company.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Mike Swift, San Jose Mercury News (MCT)
SAN JOSE, Calif. - Once derided as Google's folly, the home of cheesy cat videos and the money-losing stepchild of an otherwise wildly profitable company, YouTube is emerging as a model for the more nimble, faster-paced company Google co-founder Larry Page hopes to foster as he takes the reins as CEO. That's quite a shift. While YouTube was a cultural phenomenon when Google bought it in 2006, it was bleeding money - losing nearly half a billion dollars as recently as 2009, by one estimate.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Google Inc. executives provided investment analysts with a bright outlook yesterday in a display of confidence that appeared aimed at defusing concerns about the company's growth. Chief executive officer Eric Schmidt said he saw no limit to the Internet search engine's ability to develop better advertising formulas, in turn generating more of the commissions that account for most of its profit. Schmidt underscored his optimism at one point by saying Google someday might reach $100 billion in annual revenue as it expanded into a variety of new advertising channels, including television, radio and publishing.
NEWS
January 1, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From a collective of totally cool geek outlaws to corporate monster? Internet behemoth Google has bought Hollywood. Well, not quite. Company cofounders Sergey Brin and Larry Page, who are worth $11 billion each, are opening a slim mineshaft in the film industry by financing a friend's indie feature. Writer-director Reid Gershbein's flick, Broken Arrows, is about a man who becomes a professional killer after his pregnant wife dies in a terrorist attack. Gershbein befriended the Google dudes when they were doctoral students in computer science at Stanford University.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a bumpy ride, but when Google Inc. finally made it to the stock market last week, investors cast aside doubts and drove the company's shares up 26 percent in the first two days of trading. After being priced at $85 a share Wednesday night - far below the company's initial projection of $108 to $135 a share - the stock opened at $100.01 on Thursday and shot up to close at $108.31 Friday in Nasdaq trading. Analysts said the problems that had plagued Google since it applied to become a publicly traded company in April had vanished - at least temporarily - in the minds of investors once the stock actually began trading: It jumped 18 percent above its IPO price on its very first trade.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares of online search company Google Inc. rose 18 percent to close at $100.34 yesterday, a first-day "pop" that still left questions about whether the company's initial public offering could be considered a success. The closing price was "still lower than the original IPO price" that Google had initially predicted, noted John Tinker, managing director of ThinkEquity Partners L.L.C., a research and investment-banking company in San Francisco. "If it's not a failure, it clearly didn't work the way Google's management intended it," said Barry Randall, portfolio manager for the First American Technology Fund.
NEWS
August 19, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Internet phenomenon Google Inc. can finally become a publicly traded company today, after it weathered an arduous four-month waiting period marked by bad timing, an apparent lack of investor interest, and possible securities violations. The Securities and Exchange Commission granted the company approval yesterday to proceed with its initial public offering. When they begin trading, shares in Google - which operates the Internet's most popular search engine - will bear the ticker symbol GOOG.
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