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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1990 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
If Steven Spielberg has his way and makes no more tales of Indiana Jones, armchair thrill-seekers should know that there is an alternative source for Saturday-matinee-style adventures. Republic Pictures Home Video, descendant of the old Republic studio whose cliffhanging serials inspired Spielberg and other action directors, has a collection of 1940s chapter epics. These films are, by turns, hokey, exciting, hilarious, suspenseful and just a heck of a lot of fun. These serials are the movies' equivalent of comic books (a charge leveled against some of Spielberg's productions today)
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Ellen Dunkel, Staff Writer
When last we met Julian Fellowes, it was at Downton Abbey , where modernity was creeping into the Crawleys' way of life. Fellowes was creator, writer, and producer of TV's beloved costume drama, whose finale in March coincided in the story with the demise of the landed gentry. But great estates are a prized topic for Fellowes, an actor, writer, and member of the House of Lords. He has also written novels, movies such as The Young Victoria and the Oscar-winning Gosford Park , and the Broadway musicals Mary Poppins and (more surprisingly)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
More than a half-dozen video companies are betting that the Dick Tracy movie that opened in theaters last week will trigger a surge of interest in the detective's previous screen incarnations. The old Tracy serials and 1940s B movies are being dusted off and given new video packages at low sale prices, and because most of the films are in the public domain, there's little restriction on who can bring them to market. A tour of any discount store's video racks will probably turn up Dick Tracy vs. Cueball or Dick Tracy's Dilemma under various labels.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Anyone with a warm spot for the cliffhanger serials of the 1940s and '50s will revel in a pair of new releases from Republic Pictures Home Video, a division of the old studio that once churned out these tales of derring-do. The 200-plus minutes of the serials The Crimson Ghost (1946) and Zombies of the Stratosphere (1952) have been whittled down to "movies" of 93 minutes that can be absorbed in one sitting. What's more, they've been computer- colorized, much as Ted Turner has been colorizing old films.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1987 | By KAY GARDELLA, New York Daily News
One thing I get tired of hearing every time a major story like the Iran- Contra hearings are rightfully covered by television, is how people miss their soap operas. Fortunately, this time out, the hearings have outrated the daytime serials by 10 percent, suggesting that real drama is far more interesting than these fictitious daytime potboilers. With these soap serials, and the proliferation of game shows and shopping shows, television is well on its way to becoming just a cheap advertising vehicle.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following Archbishop Carroll's early-season trek through its Catholic League schedule is like watching one of those old-time adventure serials - one narrow escape after another. On Sunday, the Patriots won a 47-46 cliffhanger over St. Joseph's Prep. In its only other Catholic League South victory, Carroll just barely squeezed by Monsignor Bonner, 34-33, 10 days ago. The victory evened the Patriots' divisional record at 2-2 and lifted their overall slate to 13-3. St. Joe's (3-1, 9-2)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2012
* ALCATRAZ. 8 tonight, Fox 29. PEOPLE WHO GO into the two-hour premiere of Fox's "Alcatraz" expecting "Lost"-meets-"Prison Break" are bound to be disappointed. A drama with supernatural overtones, it is, yes, set on an island - though one that San Franciscans can see on any day when the fog isn't obscuring it and which is visited by more than a million tourists a year - and, OK, "Lost's" Jorge Garcia is one of its stars and J.J. Abrams one of its executive producers. "In theory, you know, any land mass is an island," Abrams said last week during the Television Critics Association's winter meetings when someone pointed out the obvious to Garcia.
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writer
Suspensions and transfers were handed down today to two supervisors who worked in the Police Department's Firearms Identifications Unit. Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said Lt. Vincent Testa, former commander of the FIU, was suspended without pay for 30 days and will be permanently transferred to another unit. Sgt. Andrew Little was suspended for five days without pay, and also will be sent to another unit. Both had direct knowledge of an alleged theft of automatic weapon parts that was committed in 2009 by Officer Anthony Magsam.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Science fiction's pulp sensibility reached its cinematic apotheosis in George Lucas' glorious Star Wars trilogy, but that breakthrough space opera was not born in a vacuum, so to speak. One of its obvious roots was the Flash Gordon comic strip created by artist Alex Raymond in 1934, which two years later gave rise to the Universal Studios serials starring former Olympic athlete Buster Crabbe. Now those black-and-white days of derring-do can be relived in a four- cassette boxed set of Flash Gordon adventures from Questar Video (about 90 minutes each, $79.95 for the collection)
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By Bruce Cook, Los Angeles Daily News
There are no fans like soap-opera fans. In daytime or prime time, they schedule their activities around their favorite shows. And should they miss a day, there are newspaper columns to bring them up to date. Soap magazines provide monthly synopses, as well as features on favorite characters. It's a world all its own, and many seem to prefer it to the real one they live in. Like any world, it has a history. In the case of Guiding Light, the first continuing daytime drama, it's a history that goes back 50 years, to when that show began on radio.
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NEWS
September 13, 2016
The FBI and the Philadelphia Police Department are seeking the public's help in identifying a suspected serial bank robber in connection with his latest strike - the TD Bank branch on South 11th St. Sunday. The subject, described as a black male in his 40s, approximately 5'8", is suspected in three other heists: the Sept. 4 robbery of the same TD Bank branch on South 11th Street; the Aug. 19 attempted robbery of the Citizens Bank branch on North 5th Street; and the robbery 40 minutes later of the Hyperion Bank branch on the 100 block of West Girard Avenue.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
AUTHORITIES SAY a woman has been arrested in a months-long series of thefts in which more than $3,000 worth of bagged coffee was taken from Wawa stores around the region. Rebecca Julian, 48, of Wilmington, admitted stealing the coffee and making fraudulent returns in an interview with detectives Friday, West Goshen Township police said. Police had released surveillance images of the theft suspect this week, saying she would steal bags of coffee from one Wawa, then take them to another location and return them for cash.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Over the July Fourth holiday weekend, 16 fires that blazed across Camden were intentionally set, police said, burning in 14 vacant buildings and two cars over 43 hours. On Thursday morning, less than three days after the last fire was set, a police officer searching for the suspect in the arsons found him walking down Federal Street. Charles E. Ricks Jr., 44, later confessed during "an extensive interview process," police said at a Friday afternoon news conference. Ricks has been charged with the 14 fires set inside vacant houses; police said they are looking into whether he is behind "several other arsons" over the last several months.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
An alleged serial bank robber nicknamed by authorities the "Straw Hat Bandit" struck again Saturday in Montgomery County, authorities said. Around 10:10 a.m., the man - who concealed his appearance with a tan hat and a makeshift mask of fabric with eyeholes - robbed the PNC bank at 1216 Welsh Rd. in North Wales, the FBI said in a statement. After brandishing a black semiautomatic handgun and ordering customers to the floor, he demanded money from tellers, then fled on foot after receiving an undisclosed amount of cash.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
All TV family dramas are not alike, even those kicked off by the return of prodigal sons or daughters to their rich families. That point couldn't be made more clearly than it is in two new shows. One is the Oprah Winfrey-produced Greenleaf , which makes its two-night, three-hour premiere on Winfrey's OWN on Tuesday and Wednesday. It's about a Memphis megachurch, the family who controls it, and the long-estranged daughter who may expose their secrets. The other, CBS's American Gothic , which will premiere Wednesday, is about another influential family, this one in Boston, with a long-estranged son who may be a notorious serial killer (or may just know which one of them is)
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Ellen Dunkel, Staff Writer
When last we met Julian Fellowes, it was at Downton Abbey , where modernity was creeping into the Crawleys' way of life. Fellowes was creator, writer, and producer of TV's beloved costume drama, whose finale in March coincided in the story with the demise of the landed gentry. But great estates are a prized topic for Fellowes, an actor, writer, and member of the House of Lords. He has also written novels, movies such as The Young Victoria and the Oscar-winning Gosford Park , and the Broadway musicals Mary Poppins and (more surprisingly)
BUSINESS
January 29, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Chet Kanojia, the tech entrepreneur who set off one of the biggest legal battles in recent television history with the Aereo streaming service, unveiled a new wireless venture Wednesday for high-speed Internet services to challenge Comcast Corp. and others. At a news conference near New York's Madison Square Garden, Kanojia said his Starry Inc. venture will offer lower monthly broadband prices, gigabit speeds, and no data-consumption caps. "There is an insane amount of available spectrum, and on top of that there is unlicensed spectrum," said Kanojia, pooh-poohing the notion that he wouldn't find spectrum capacity for Starry.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Serial' drops season 2 Serial fans, your time has come. On Thursday, Sarah Koenig 's insanely addictive podcast returned for its much-awaited second season. This year, Koenig and Co. focus on controversial soldier Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl , who left his Afghani base in 2009 and spent five years in Taliban captivity. In 2014, he was released in exchange for five Taliban fighters, a move immediately criticized over rumors that Bergdahl was a traitor who switched sides. Bergdahl claims he was a young, egotistical soldier who wanted to alert commanders about leadership problems in his platoon that could endanger his comrades in arms.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
An East Germantown man Monday pleaded no contest to raping four girls, ages 12 to 17, in his neighborhood during a 21/2-month stretch in 2013. Prosecutors said Antuane Brown, 25, attacked the girls at gunpoint in separate incidents between March and June 2013. All the attacks happened within five blocks of his home on the 1100 block of Price Street. His trial was scheduled to begin Monday. He faces a maximum sentence of 320 years in prison. "These four young girls and their families have gone through unimaginable pain and suffering because of what Antuane Brown did to them, and today's plea of no contest makes sure he is punished for his crimes," Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams said in a statement.
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