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Service Companies

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BUSINESS
December 18, 1995 | By Jerry W. Byrd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Local companies posted strong income gains in the first nine months of 1995 as low costs for labor and materials helped control spending. Manufacturing and technology companies reported the heftiest returns, which economists say may be a sign of continuing demand for high-technology equipment. "Businesses in general have been enjoying strong profitability over the past several years, because they've been able to control labor costs, the cost of borrowing has been falling, and materials costs are under control," said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Regional Financial Associates, of West Chester.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1991 | by Jenice Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
A local electrical supply distributor has made it to Black Enterprise magazine's annual listing of the largest African American-owned businesses in America. The RPM Supply Co. is ranked 93rd on the list of the 100-largest black- owned industrial service companies. Started 13 years ago by Robert P. Mapp in the garage of his East Germantown home, the company has expanded to 20 employees and occupies a combination warehouse/office space on Second Street near Green. RPM posted sales of $9.8 million in 1990.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From modest beginnings, a handful of Philadelphia-area companies grew rapidly in the 1980s and 1990s to become the nation's top mass-market service sellers. The region gave birth to dominant players in credit cards and mutual funds, prescription drugs and cable television, cafeterias and financial software. This collection of service companies spreads across the region to form a diverse elite that does not much resemble the old power center of Philadelphia-based railroads, manufacturers and banks.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
From modest beginnings, a handful of Philadelphia-area companies grew rapidly in the 1980s and 1990s to become the nation's top mass-market service sellers. The region gave birth to dominant players in credit cards and mutual funds, prescription drugs and cable television, cafeterias and financial software. This collection of service companies spreads across the region to form a diverse elite that does not much resemble the old power center of Philadelphia-based railroads, manufacturers and banks.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2012 | By Pallavi Gogoi, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A surge in hiring last month got a big welcome on Wall Street on Friday. The Dow Jones industrial average soared 217.29 points to close at 13,096.17, ending a four-day losing streak. Markets had been slumping all week after central banks in the United States and Europe took no new action to shore up the economy, as investors had hoped. The Labor Department's monthly jobs report gave investors assurance that the U.S. economy may be doing better on its own. U.S. employers added 163,000 jobs last month, far more than the 100,000 that economists were expecting.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1993 | By Neill A. Borowski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 1990-91 recession was especially harsh on much of the nation's service industries, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau. After booming through the second half of the 1980s, service businesses ranging from law firms to laundries showed little growth or a decline in revenues between 1990 and 1991, statistics released this summer in the Service Annual Survey show. Only the health-services sector - particularly nonprofit, tax-exempt establishments - grew between 1990 and 1991 at a rate close to the average annual rate of growth in the second half of the 1980s.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1989 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aw, the poor service industry, haunted by stereotypes of low pay, low capital investment and low productivity. "They feel like the Rodney Dangerfield of the economy. They get no respect," said Patrick T. Harker, director of the Fishman-Davidson Center for the Study of the Service Sector at the Wharton School. People just do not understand the service industry. And trying to understand that huge part of the world's economy is the mission of the research center on the University of Pennsylvania campus.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1987 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the world of corporate finance and venture capital, James C. Wheat Jr. is considered a man of vision. A civil engineer by training, Wheat took the tiny firm founded by his father in Richmond, Va., in 1922 and created Wheat First Securities Inc., a respected company with 50 offices in the mid-Atlantic region and one of the largest investment-banking staffs outside New York. That Wheat, 67, has been blind since age 24 is a fact that merely enhances his reputation. "Jim has an amazing memory," said William V. Daniel, a Wheat executive vice president.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2013 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
When Martin Rawls-Meehan started making adjustable beds in 2004, it was a foregone conclusion that key parts would be made overseas. It was cheaper to manufacture in Taiwan than in the United States, and from Taiwan it was easier to ship to customers in Asia. But this year, Rawls-Meehan's company, Reverie, began making some beds in their entirety at a factory in New York. "Shipping costs are tremendous," he said, soaring between 50 percent and 60 percent since the company was founded.
NEWS
October 27, 1990
BANKRUPTCY WOULD ALLOW CUTTING BUREAUCRACY The tax-and-spend policies of Mayor Goode are rooted in his liberal, bureaucratic, welfare-state beliefs. Mr. Goode believes that the people's welfare depends on state paternalism rather than individual self-reliance. Although Philadelphia deserves its recently awarded junk-bond rating, the city is not without proven options. Just ask Margaret Thatcher or Mikhail Gorbachev. It's called privatization. Mr. Goode understands what he should do but lacks the moral courage.
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NEWS
October 17, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evesham's nightlife never looked quite this good. The Burlington County town announced Thursday that it will partner with two big-name ride-service companies to transport bar- and restaurant-goers to their homes late at night - part of a continued effort to combat drunken driving - through the end of the year. For free. "You can sit at a bar and literally push a button on your phone and have someone come pick you up," Mayor Randy Brown said. "We wanted to make it that easy. " Uber, a popular car-service company, will feature an Evesham "safe ride" option for customers to request free rides through UberX.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William T. Pfeffer, 65, of Somerdale, who owned and operated Chatham Communications, a telephone services firm in Bellmawr, from 1981 until it was sold in 2007, died of Parkinson's disease Thursday, Oct. 16, at his home. Born in Camden, Mr. Pfeffer graduated from Collingswood High School in 1967, where he won medals while on the wrestling team, daughter Jennifer Campbell said. After serving in the Navy, Mr. Pfeffer was a lineman for New Jersey Bell Telephone Co. in the 1970s, she said.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2013 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
When Martin Rawls-Meehan started making adjustable beds in 2004, it was a foregone conclusion that key parts would be made overseas. It was cheaper to manufacture in Taiwan than in the United States, and from Taiwan it was easier to ship to customers in Asia. But this year, Rawls-Meehan's company, Reverie, began making some beds in their entirety at a factory in New York. "Shipping costs are tremendous," he said, soaring between 50 percent and 60 percent since the company was founded.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BEHIND HIM were many years of often brutally hard work, sometimes from dawn to dark; a family of eight children, some of whom became sports stars; service in the Army; many friends; and the acclaim and popularity of a friendly, jovial Irishman. Joseph "Moon" Conlin sat down in a grandstand in Schwenksville on Saturday morning to do what he loved most in recent years, watch a grandson play Little League baseball. In the bottom of the first inning, he fell over in his seat. A coach tried CPR. Joseph Conlin was rushed to Pottstown Memorial Hospital, but he died of a massive heart attack at the age of 79. When he ran his own tire-repair business, servicing customers from his truck, starting at dawn and not getting home until dark, Joseph would sometimes fall asleep while eating dinner.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2012 | By Pallavi Gogoi, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A surge in hiring last month got a big welcome on Wall Street on Friday. The Dow Jones industrial average soared 217.29 points to close at 13,096.17, ending a four-day losing streak. Markets had been slumping all week after central banks in the United States and Europe took no new action to shore up the economy, as investors had hoped. The Labor Department's monthly jobs report gave investors assurance that the U.S. economy may be doing better on its own. U.S. employers added 163,000 jobs last month, far more than the 100,000 that economists were expecting.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From modest beginnings, a handful of Philadelphia-area companies grew rapidly in the 1980s and 1990s to become the nation's top mass-market service sellers. The region gave birth to dominant players in credit cards and mutual funds, prescription drugs and cable television, cafeterias and financial software. This collection of service companies spreads across the region to form a diverse elite that does not much resemble the old power center of Philadelphia-based railroads, manufacturers and banks.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
From modest beginnings, a handful of Philadelphia-area companies grew rapidly in the 1980s and 1990s to become the nation's top mass-market service sellers. The region gave birth to dominant players in credit cards and mutual funds, prescription drugs and cable television, cafeterias and financial software. This collection of service companies spreads across the region to form a diverse elite that does not much resemble the old power center of Philadelphia-based railroads, manufacturers and banks.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Unisys Corp., of Blue Bell, said yesterday it would slash 3,000 jobs. The slowing economy - compounded by the Sept. 11 attacks - has led corporations to dramatically cut spending on computer services, it said. "The tragic events of Sept. 11 . . . added greater uncertainty to an already fragile global economic climate," said Lawrence A. Weinbach, Unisys chairman and chief executive officer. "In this environment, we saw organizations across our targeted industries - particularly in airlines and travel, financial services and communications - delay planned [information technology]
BUSINESS
October 1, 2001 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These are pivotal times for Hewlett-Packard Co., which is working to regain its status as a technology powerhouse - and its Philadelphia-area-based software division could play a key role in that effort. As HP pursues its plan to acquire rival PC-maker Compaq Computer Corp., analysts say HP's local software division, formerly Bluestone Software, may help turn HP into a one-stop-shopping computer services company capable of competing head-to-head with the likes of International Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2000 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
West Pharmaceutical Services Inc., the Lionville drug packaging and services company, reported a drop in third-quarter sales and profits yesterday and said it would consider selling assets or some business combinations. The company, which reported a 47 percent decline in profit over the same period last year, said it hired investment bank UBS Warburg L.L.C. to examine alternatives. "Our overall results have been very disappointing this year," said William G. Little, chairman and chief executive officer of West Pharmaceuticals.
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