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Sesame Oil

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FOOD
August 20, 1997 | By Steve Petusevsky, FOR THE INQUIRER
A little goes such a long way - roasted sesame oil is one of the most flavorful and aromatic oils around. As little as a half-teaspoon is enough to impart a roasted, earthy flavor to whole batches of everything from soups to entrees to salads. There are actually two kinds of sesame oil on the market. There's light or natural sesame oil, which is very mild and pale. I use it in salads, not for cooking. And there's the more popular dark-roasted sesame oil that is dark brown and used typically in Asian-inspired dishes.
FOOD
September 15, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 6 servings 1/2 pound of chicken, shrimp, pork, or a combination of the three, chopped into small pieces 2 eggs beaten 1/4 cup frozen peas 3 to 4 cups of cooked rice (at least a day old; the rice must be cold) 3 tablespoons soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil 3 tablespoon peanut oil Dash of white pepper 1 onion finely chopped 2 finely chopped scallions, including the green part 1/2 to 1 cup bean sprouts 1 cup shaved cabbage - long, thin strips 2 stalks of celery, thinly sliced 1 peeled carrot, cut into matchsticks (julienne)
FOOD
September 18, 2008 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
Hot Thai peanut sauce and shiitake mushrooms give a new twist to tostadas. Traditional tostadas have a deep-fried base, but it's easier and more healthful to crisp the tortillas under the broiler. Don't let Asian ingredients gather dust in your pantry. Sesame oil gives a nutty flavor to sauteed meats and salads, while peanut sauce is great on kebabs or as a dip for cooked meats. Mexican-Asian Tostadas 1. Heat broiler. Line a baking sheet with foil and spray with oil. Spray both sides of the tortillas and place on the sheet.
FOOD
January 26, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
Maybe it's time to look beyond claims of virginity in the oil aisle. Because you see, our 20-year love affair with olive oil has had fallout. We've forgotten that there's a whole world of oils that don't come from the olive tree. And they can do a heck of a lot more than just saute and make a fine dressing. OK, maybe we didn't forget. Maybe we didn't know about them at all. It's not as though before the EVOO revolution we were all swilling avocado and grape-seed oils. But olive oil has done a fine job of elbowing out other up-and-comers.
FOOD
March 8, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Chinese food, once thought too exotic for home cooks, has been so de- mystified in recent years that many dishes have actually become American family standbys. Stir-fry recipes abound. So do East-West combinations such as hamburger casseroles made crunchy with water chestnuts or chicken dishes enlivened with soy sauce and fresh ginger. The menu that follows - one designed for cooks In a Hurry - requires some ingredients that are slightly unusual but that store well, so you can keep a supply on hand after an initial shopping trip.
FOOD
March 1, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
The broth of this clean-tasting, light dinner soup is brightened by an infusion of fresh ginger and dashes of fish sauce and sesame oil.   Poached Shrimp in Ginger Broth Makers 2 or 3 servings 1 pound raw, shell-on jumbo shrimp 1 small red chile pepper 2 scallions 1 small clove garlic 1 1/2-inch piece gingerroot 2 cups loosely packed fresh mung bean sprouts 1/3 cup packed cilantro leaves...
FOOD
August 24, 1986 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
One of Peking's more famous dishes is lamb, marinated in a mixture of soy sauce and sherry, stir-fried with garlic and scallions and finished with a simple, sweetened soy sauce. The whole process takes less than half an hour, yet the result is rich, full-flavored and satisfying. But suppose you don't like, can't find or can't afford lamb? Then consider an updated version of the dish made with convenient turkey cutlets. Turkey has enough flavor of its own to stand up to distinctive seasonings like garlic, scallions and sesame oil. The cutlets are available in most large supermarkets, and though they are more expensive than bone-in parts, they are still affordable.
FOOD
June 27, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedg, Washington Post
With today's meat-on-the-side, vegetables-in-the-middle sensibility, it's time for an update on the steak dinner. Slice that steak thin and mix it with vegetables for a beautiful main-course salad. Teriyaki Steak, Snow Pea and Shiitake Salad     For the steak: 3 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 2 teaspoons brown sugar 1 pound flank steak, 1 to 1 1/2 inches thick For the salad: Kosher salt 6 ounces snow pea pods 3 tablespoons olive oil 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, sliced into 1/4-inch strips 1/2 medium sweet onion, finely chopped (1/2 cup)
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FOOD
September 16, 2016
Before the end of the summer vegetable harvest, it's time to stock up on favorites like zucchini, tomatoes, and corn. Especially corn. Here, corn finds its perfect companion with juicy shrimp. Most dishes featuring these ingredients highlight the harmony among them, like these corn and shrimp pancakes. Corn and Shrimp Silver-Dollar Pancakes with Avocado Crema Makes 16 pancakes 1 cup flour 1/3 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 extra-large egg, beaten 1 cup corn kernels 1 bunch green onions, thinly sliced 1 pound raw shrimp shelled, deveined, diced, patted dry 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon sesame oil Vegetable oil Avocado cream (see note)
FOOD
September 15, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 6 servings 1/2 pound of chicken, shrimp, pork, or a combination of the three, chopped into small pieces 2 eggs beaten 1/4 cup frozen peas 3 to 4 cups of cooked rice (at least a day old; the rice must be cold) 3 tablespoons soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil 3 tablespoon peanut oil Dash of white pepper 1 onion finely chopped 2 finely chopped scallions, including the green part 1/2 to 1 cup bean sprouts 1 cup shaved cabbage - long, thin strips 2 stalks of celery, thinly sliced 1 peeled carrot, cut into matchsticks (julienne)
FOOD
February 5, 2016
Makes 2 to 4 servings, plus extra dressing 2 large portobello mushrooms 2 tablespoons toasted sesame or grapeseed oil 1 tablespoon tamari or low-sodium soy sauce Sea salt and fresh ground pepper For the Tahini Citrus Miso Dressing: 1/2 cup tahini 2 tablespoons white or yellow miso 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil 2 teaspoons sriracha or hot sauce 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar ...
NEWS
January 16, 2015
CHICKEN LAAB WITH MINT AND THAI BASIL IN LETTUCE CUPS This recipe takes just 23 minutes to prepare and cook. Juice of 2 large limes 1 pound ground organic free-range chicken or turkey (half white and dark meat) 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 2 shallots, thinly sliced 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1/4 cup paleo-friendly fish sauce 2 tablespoons cilantro, chopped 2 tablespoons Thai basil, chopped 2 tablespoons mint, chopped 2 scallions, chopped 2 limes, quartered, for serving 1 head iceberg lettuce, washed and dried, leaves separated and kept whole In a medium bowl, combine the lime juice and ground meat and mix well.
FOOD
June 27, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedg, Washington Post
With today's meat-on-the-side, vegetables-in-the-middle sensibility, it's time for an update on the steak dinner. Slice that steak thin and mix it with vegetables for a beautiful main-course salad. Teriyaki Steak, Snow Pea and Shiitake Salad     For the steak: 3 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 2 teaspoons brown sugar 1 pound flank steak, 1 to 1 1/2 inches thick For the salad: Kosher salt 6 ounces snow pea pods 3 tablespoons olive oil 8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, sliced into 1/4-inch strips 1/2 medium sweet onion, finely chopped (1/2 cup)
FOOD
March 7, 2013 | By Sara Moulton, Associated Press
My favorite way to prepare clams is to steam them. In this recipe, I added broccoli rabe, which absorbs some of the clam liquor as it cooks. Asian Steamed Clams or Mussels With Broccoli Rabe Makes 4 servings 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 1/2 cup finely chopped scallions (white and green parts) 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon Chinese chili sauce (or hot sauce) 1/2 cup dry white wine 1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth 3 dozen littleneck clams or 2 pounds mussels, scrubbed well 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil 3 cups blanched and coarsely chopped broccoli rabe 8 thick slices country-style bread, toasted 1. In a large saucepan, heat the oil over medium high.
FOOD
March 1, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
The broth of this clean-tasting, light dinner soup is brightened by an infusion of fresh ginger and dashes of fish sauce and sesame oil.   Poached Shrimp in Ginger Broth Makers 2 or 3 servings 1 pound raw, shell-on jumbo shrimp 1 small red chile pepper 2 scallions 1 small clove garlic 1 1/2-inch piece gingerroot 2 cups loosely packed fresh mung bean sprouts 1/3 cup packed cilantro leaves...
FOOD
February 14, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post
This Asian-inspired dish is a great mix of textures and flavors. Pepper Planks Stuffed With Shrimp, Jicama and Shiitakes Makes 6 servings 2 large bell peppers (any color) 2 tablespoons vegetable oil Salt Fresh black pepper 4 or 5 scallions, white and light-green parts, finely chopped 4 ounces shiitake mushrooms (stemmed), cut into 1/4-inch dice 2 1/2 ounces peeled jicama, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 6 ounces peeled and deveined raw shrimp,    coarsely chopped 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
It's easy to be smitten with the green sauces of summer. Practically every savory meal or snack my family has consumed for the last few weeks has been a delivery vehicle for these uncooked mixtures based on cilantro or parsley harvested from a deck garden or the local farmer's market. Those arepas and empanadas we get take-out from a Venezuelan restaurant? They're merely scoops for a spectacular vegetable puree called guasacaca that accompanies them in a much-too-small take-out tub. The food at a certain Mexican place nearby is very good, but many customers are more in love with the bright, grass-colored blend that is a simple, no-recipe mash of pickled jalapeño juice, cilantro, and garlic.
FOOD
February 2, 2012 | By Susan M. Selasky, Detroit Free Press
Orange you glad it's February? If you eat and shop for food in season, check out the citrus aisle. Now is peak time for oranges, and most stores are loaded with them. Not only is the fruit a bright spot in winter, it brings some juicy health benefits.   Clementine and Five-Spice Chicken Makes 4 servings 10 clementines (mandarins, honey tangerines or oranges) Generous 1/4 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder 1/4 teaspoon Szechuan peppercorns, crushed, or crushed red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon canola oil 4 large, bone-in chicken thighs (about 2 pounds total)
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