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FOOD
October 19, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
For many of us, setting a table for company means hunting around the house for a tablecloth that isn't stained from the last holiday dinner. The wedding-gift dishes, the cutlery that requires polishing, the most fragile glassware and the cloth napkins come out of storage. The idle dining room comes to life. There's a certain comfort in seeing the "good" china and silverware a few times a year, but special-occasion tables need not look the same every time. You don't make the same meal for every holiday or every dinner party, so why set the table the same way?
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware County Council is expected to approve a $250-an-hour contract today with an Ardmore psychiatrist who will review the placements of community-bound patients from Haverford State Hospital as it proceeds toward its shutdown in June. Joseph DiGiacomo, who is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, will also perform spot checks of diagnoses as part of the agreement. His fees will be capped at $12,500, plus out-of-pocket expenses.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A decade ago, working amid the whirring machines and chatter of a busy warehouse would have been an impossibility for Linda Miller. But these days, the exuberant 40-year-old stands among colleagues who laud her as a valuable worker and talks about working at Harcourt Education Group, a textbook publisher here. "It's a good job," she said, watching a textbook snake along a series of conveyor belts. "I like to go to work every day. " Miller, who is developmentally disabled, is one of a growing number of people employed in traditional workplaces after years spent in so-called sheltered settings, which employ only disabled individuals and provide extensive support services.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2003 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a not-too-risky prediction about what Ikea has planned for you with the layout of its new store, which is scheduled to open next week in Conshohocken: You will buy something you didn't know you wanted or needed. It could be a 95-cent plastic dish brush - in a variety of colors - with a smiley face on the handle. Or maybe napkins, a tablecloth, china, and a dining table - some assembly required on the table - to put them on. Ikea, the Swedish company that experts call the world's largest furniture retailer, has been a staple in the Philadelphia area since it opened its first North American store in Plymouth Meeting in 1985.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As part of Delaware County's effort to find community-based housing for former Haverford State Hospital residents, the County Council is expected today to approve $2.8 million in new funding for two mental-health care providers. The contract increases being awarded to Elwyn Inc. in Middletown and Philadelphia-based Horizon House are part of a pattern. Since the hospital closed in June, millions of dollars in state and federal funds for mental-health care have been redirected to nonprofit subcontractors that run group homes where former Haverford State patients are being resettled.
TRAVEL
July 21, 2013
ThermaCell makes electronic bug-repelling devices that usually use a repellent substance activated by heat from a replaceable butane cartridge. Now the company has designed a bug banisher that multitasks as an outdoor lantern. Eight LED lights with low and high settings run on 4 AA batteries (not included). The included butane cartridge heats an included insect repellent pad, thwarting mosquitos and other flying insects for up to 15 square feet. The lantern has on/off settings and a button to activate the butane cartridge.
NEWS
March 4, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Sonus, a Baltimore ensemble whose members include a singer, a pianist and a flutist, made its second visit to Philadelphia Monday night in a concert at the Ethical Society. I wish I'd enjoyed it more, for despite the plethora of local and international chamber groups playing here it is always good to hear what musicians in neighboring cities are doing. Dedicated to innovative programs, Sonus themes events around a musical or extra-musical idea, making sure to include scores you don't hear all the time, that is, many from the current century.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
I'M TIRED of hearing Second Amendment advocates defend this right so absolutely in the face of our city's gun violence. It's true that guns by themselves aren't a problem. But in settings where social, emotional, drug or economic issues are dire, the option of having an instrument in your hands that lets you make a split-second, impulsive, deadly decision shouldn't exist! When toddlers and mothers are fair game for shootings, I think the solution is obvious: Get these guns off our streets!
NEWS
June 17, 2013
D EAR ABBY: My husband and I have five kids, all under 6 years of age. The youngest are 7-month-old twins. A family in our church has offered to watch them so my husband and I can go out on a date. We haven't been alone together in a year. I would like to accept their kind offer, but two things are holding me back. First, I don't think they realize the enormity of the task. Second, I don't have anything to say to my husband. A date would be awkward and most likely consist of "relations.
NEWS
June 17, 2002 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Beth Orton's gift is her beautifully languid, melancholy voice; her talent is to situate her vocals within richly textured settings. Although she's a folkie at heart, she maintains roots in electronica, where her warm voice provides a humanizing contrast to synthetic beats. Friday at the sold-out Theater of Living Arts, the British singer-songwriter showcased both sides of her character. With her longtime quartet augmented by under-utilized violin and cello, Orton debuted most of the excellent Daybreaker (Astralwerks, due July 30)
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BUSINESS
July 25, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Brown Hill plans to begin work next month on a long-planned apartment building that could strengthen the link between Old City and the Delaware River waterfront, helping to overcome the isolating effects of the highway that divides them. An Aug. 5 groundbreaking is planned for the 205 Race St. project, a sleek 17-story glass and dark metal tower to be built on the west side of the Race Street Connector, a passage beneath I-95. The project is part of a cluster of developments that backers hope will invigorate the area by creating a solid base of residents and visitors on both sides of the interstate.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Americans travelled more highway miles through May than during the first five months of any previous year, the U.S. Department of Transportation said Tuesday. The department warned that "increased gridlock nationwide can be expected unless changes are made in the near-term" to expand highway capacity or shift travel from roads. The new record of 1.26 trillion miles topped the previous record of 1.23 trillion miles set in May 2007. The new data showed that Americans drove 275.1 billion miles in May, the most ever in May of any year.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
SHE BREEZES into the bank, note in hand: a demand for money, a threat to detonate a bomb. She's done it five times in as many weeks, all over Northeast Philly. And nobody knows what she looks like. FBI agents are hot on the trail of a woman they've dubbed the "Burqa Bandit," who wears the traditional Muslim garb during her capers. Despite the lack of detailed description, investigators are confident they'll catch her. Meanwhile, at the height of the Burqa Bandit's reign, another woman, Heather Lane, allegedly hatched her own bank robbery July 15. Lane, 26, wasn't as successful: Cops caught her allegedly holding the bag shortly after she fled a TD Bank on Ridge Avenue near Hermit Street in Wissahickon.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuition for incoming freshmen and sophomores at Pennsylvania State University's main campus would rise 2.7 percent, or $450, for 2015-16 under a proposal passed by the board of trustees' finance committee Thursday. In-state students would pay $17,022, up from $16,572 last year, the university said. Out-of-state students also would pay more. In March, the trustees approved a 3.89 percent increase in room-and-board costs. If the tuition proposal is adopted this week, the total per-student cost, including fees, would exceed $28,100 for next year.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A landmark Cherry Hill restaurant that for decades has served up seafood, Sunday brunch, dance parties, and charity events will soon close its doors. The Coastline Bar & Grill, which filed for bankruptcy two weeks ago, will close after the case's settlement, which likely will be early next year, according to a lawyer for the Brace Road restaurant. "They are - and I guess they still are - a great institution," former Cherry Hill Mayor Bernie Platt said. "I remember it before it was the Coastline.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter was set to depart Tuesday night for a six-day trade mission to Germany and Israel, to encourage companies there to do business in Philadelphia and local firms to expand into those foreign markets. He was scheduled to fly first to Frankfurt and sign a sister-city agreement. "I think there's a synergy between and among our cities. There's a very strong German American community here in Philadelphia, one of the first that was settled in the United States," Nutter said in brief remarks at City Hall before departing.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Rep. Vanessa Brown, the Philadelphia legislator who abruptly abandoned plans to plead guilty to corruption charges, now faces trial next month in the resurrected sting case. In a brief hearing Monday, Dauphin County Court Judge Scott Evans set Brown's tentative trial date for Aug. 10. Brown told the judge she was no longer represented by an attorney and was finding a new one. "You should have an attorney," he told her. Brown declined to comment before leaving the courthouse.
SPORTS
July 15, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer neiburj@phillynews.com
THE 2012-13 school year was a year of firsts for both Wellington Zaza and his track coach at Garnet Valley, Andrew Etter. Etter was in his first year as the head coach of the Jaguars and Zaza was in his first year at the school, having spent his freshman and sophomore years at Upper Darby before going to Strath Haven for his junior year. Zaza's father, Billy Neewray, is an international soccer agent based in Switzerland. Zaza has lived with different family members, and family reasons kept him on the move throughout his high school career, but his movement on the track and field stayed consistent.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A decades-old affordable housing dispute could be coming to an end in Cherry Hill, an area with one of the nation's least affordable housing markets for the middle class. At fairness hearings scheduled for July 21, a state Superior Court judge in Camden County is set to scrutinize two settlement agreements - one between Cherry Hill and housing advocates Fair Share Housing Center and the NAACP, and the second between the township and the developer Cherry Hill Land Associates. Both tentative agreements await the approval of the judge, who was granted oversight of municipalities' affordable housing obligations in a March state Supreme Court ruling.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker presents himself as a kind of Midwestern Everyman. He buys cheap shirts and sweaters at Kohl's. He drinks Miller beer. He drives a Harley-Davidson Road King. And he packs a punch. Walker, set Monday to become the 15th declared Republican presidential candidate, has enacted an aggressive conservative agenda in a blue state in a manner that belies his homespun homilies and baby face. Those two factors have helped propel Walker, 47, into the first tier of the 2016 GOP field.
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