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FOOD
October 19, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
For many of us, setting a table for company means hunting around the house for a tablecloth that isn't stained from the last holiday dinner. The wedding-gift dishes, the cutlery that requires polishing, the most fragile glassware and the cloth napkins come out of storage. The idle dining room comes to life. There's a certain comfort in seeing the "good" china and silverware a few times a year, but special-occasion tables need not look the same every time. You don't make the same meal for every holiday or every dinner party, so why set the table the same way?
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware County Council is expected to approve a $250-an-hour contract today with an Ardmore psychiatrist who will review the placements of community-bound patients from Haverford State Hospital as it proceeds toward its shutdown in June. Joseph DiGiacomo, who is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, will also perform spot checks of diagnoses as part of the agreement. His fees will be capped at $12,500, plus out-of-pocket expenses.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A decade ago, working amid the whirring machines and chatter of a busy warehouse would have been an impossibility for Linda Miller. But these days, the exuberant 40-year-old stands among colleagues who laud her as a valuable worker and talks about working at Harcourt Education Group, a textbook publisher here. "It's a good job," she said, watching a textbook snake along a series of conveyor belts. "I like to go to work every day. " Miller, who is developmentally disabled, is one of a growing number of people employed in traditional workplaces after years spent in so-called sheltered settings, which employ only disabled individuals and provide extensive support services.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2003 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a not-too-risky prediction about what Ikea has planned for you with the layout of its new store, which is scheduled to open next week in Conshohocken: You will buy something you didn't know you wanted or needed. It could be a 95-cent plastic dish brush - in a variety of colors - with a smiley face on the handle. Or maybe napkins, a tablecloth, china, and a dining table - some assembly required on the table - to put them on. Ikea, the Swedish company that experts call the world's largest furniture retailer, has been a staple in the Philadelphia area since it opened its first North American store in Plymouth Meeting in 1985.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As part of Delaware County's effort to find community-based housing for former Haverford State Hospital residents, the County Council is expected today to approve $2.8 million in new funding for two mental-health care providers. The contract increases being awarded to Elwyn Inc. in Middletown and Philadelphia-based Horizon House are part of a pattern. Since the hospital closed in June, millions of dollars in state and federal funds for mental-health care have been redirected to nonprofit subcontractors that run group homes where former Haverford State patients are being resettled.
TRAVEL
July 21, 2013
ThermaCell makes electronic bug-repelling devices that usually use a repellent substance activated by heat from a replaceable butane cartridge. Now the company has designed a bug banisher that multitasks as an outdoor lantern. Eight LED lights with low and high settings run on 4 AA batteries (not included). The included butane cartridge heats an included insect repellent pad, thwarting mosquitos and other flying insects for up to 15 square feet. The lantern has on/off settings and a button to activate the butane cartridge.
NEWS
March 4, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Sonus, a Baltimore ensemble whose members include a singer, a pianist and a flutist, made its second visit to Philadelphia Monday night in a concert at the Ethical Society. I wish I'd enjoyed it more, for despite the plethora of local and international chamber groups playing here it is always good to hear what musicians in neighboring cities are doing. Dedicated to innovative programs, Sonus themes events around a musical or extra-musical idea, making sure to include scores you don't hear all the time, that is, many from the current century.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
I'M TIRED of hearing Second Amendment advocates defend this right so absolutely in the face of our city's gun violence. It's true that guns by themselves aren't a problem. But in settings where social, emotional, drug or economic issues are dire, the option of having an instrument in your hands that lets you make a split-second, impulsive, deadly decision shouldn't exist! When toddlers and mothers are fair game for shootings, I think the solution is obvious: Get these guns off our streets!
NEWS
June 17, 2013
D EAR ABBY: My husband and I have five kids, all under 6 years of age. The youngest are 7-month-old twins. A family in our church has offered to watch them so my husband and I can go out on a date. We haven't been alone together in a year. I would like to accept their kind offer, but two things are holding me back. First, I don't think they realize the enormity of the task. Second, I don't have anything to say to my husband. A date would be awkward and most likely consist of "relations.
NEWS
June 17, 2002 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Beth Orton's gift is her beautifully languid, melancholy voice; her talent is to situate her vocals within richly textured settings. Although she's a folkie at heart, she maintains roots in electronica, where her warm voice provides a humanizing contrast to synthetic beats. Friday at the sold-out Theater of Living Arts, the British singer-songwriter showcased both sides of her character. With her longtime quartet augmented by under-utilized violin and cello, Orton debuted most of the excellent Daybreaker (Astralwerks, due July 30)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Pickup burned down a Frankford factory to get rid of fingerprints from a burglary. But instead of throwing off investigators, the arson led authorities to Pickup - and, on Monday, landed him a federal prison sentence. U.S. District Judge Darnell Jones II sentenced Pickup to five years behind bars and three years on supervised release - what prosecutors had sought - for orchestrating what raged into a four-alarm fire at 2211 Wakeling St. on Dec. 16, 2012. The arson at Arco Sales Co. shut down Amtrak and SEPTA service on the Northeast Corridor line for three hours, and left the naval products manufacturer reduced to ruins.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
SISTER MARY Scullion yesterday announced a campaign to address poverty in Philadelphia in time for Pope Francis' visit. Scullion's Project HOME and the World Meeting of Families Hunger and Homelessness Committee unveiled the three-pronged Mercy and Justice Initiative outside the Free Library. "The Pope could come - as he's done - to many countries, and it's an amazing experience, but when he leaves, it's all over," said Scullion, executive director of Project HOME. "We hope the Francis Fund and bipartisan legislation will be a lasting impact, a concrete way of affecting the lives of people that are hungry and homeless in our communities.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on Independence Mall on Friday afternoon, Mannwell Glenn doused two Confederate flags with lighter fluid and stood back to watch as the flames licked at the fabric. "If you burn a Confederate flag, to some people, that's painful," he had said earlier to a small cluster of TV news cameras. "But whatever you're feeling about us burning your sacred flag, we feel that about 100 times more when nine people are killed. " The deaths of nine people at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C. - killed by a white gunman who reportedly told police he wanted to start a race war - had been weighing on him, he said.
NEWS
June 15, 2015
WHEN POPE FRANCIS comes to Philadelphia in September, there will be one man by his side the entire time - Archbishop Charles Chaput, who should be a fascinating tour guide. Chaput, 70, a member of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, was the second Native American to become a bishop and the first to be appointed an archbishop. He was ordained 45 years ago and said that, aside from brief dreams about a career as a stunt actor or a doctor, he has wanted to be a priest "from the time I remember being conscious.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council set the stage Wednesday for a wave of tax increases designed to produce $70 million for the cash-strapped Philadelphia School District. But the plan still falls far short of the district's $103 million funding request, and it appears to come with strings attached. Council plans to hold $25 million of the projected $70 million in its own budget - because it isn't keen on the district's plan to possibly outsource the hiring of substitute teachers and nurses, a move that has angered unionized teachers and their political allies.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Since the Salvation Army began serving on Camden's front lines in 1880, perhaps 100 commanding officers have headed the city corps. But the arrival of Majors Terry and Susan Wood and the departure of Majors Paul and Alma Cain is big news for the city and region. The reason is the $90 million, 120,000-square-foot Camden Kroc Center, a magnificent complex of recreational, human service, and worship facilities that has attracted 7,000 members - and a visit from President Obama - since opening in October.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District is poised to pay a Cherry Hill firm up to $34 million to provide substitute teachers for its classrooms over two school years. Expected to be enacted later this month, the move to privatize 1,324 jobs will save the school system $10 million annually and mean fewer lost learning opportunities for students, officials said. But the action has already ignited controversy. Outraged over the outsourcing of substitute spots and other positions now held by its members, the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers has planned informational pickets for Friday.
SPORTS
June 5, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers scouting director Chris Pryor thinks this year's NHL draft, which is loaded with gifted forwards, may be as good as the star-studded 2003 class. "Obviously we don't want to be picking this high every year," Pryor said in a conference call Wednesday from Buffalo, site of the NHL scouting combine. "But if we had to, we're fortunate to have some nice options. . . . It's a good year to have the picks we have. " The Flyers have two first-round picks and seven selections in the first four rounds of the draft, to be held June 26-27, making this year's combine more intriguing than usual for the team's scouting staff.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County man who allegedly attacked an acquaintance with a sword, and then set himself on fire inside his car after he was pulled over by police on a New York highway, remained hospitalized on Tuesday. Darren Roy Desruisseaux, 31, of East Goshen Township, was airlifted to a hospital on Friday with burns mostly on his face, the Chester County District Attorney's Office said. He was reported in guarded condition. Desruisseaux allegedly banged on the apartment door of an acquaintance in Uwchlan Township early Friday.
SPORTS
June 3, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
LANCASTER - The United States Golf Association has conducted 82 championships at 29 venues throughout Pennsylvania but none at Lancaster Country Club, which is on many top-10 lists when people rank the state's courses. Lancaster will add to the state's record for most U.S. championships hosted next month, getting its chance to shine for the first time when it welcomes the 70th U.S. Women's Open. As USGA officials put the finishing touches on the course, some have questions. "I keep saying to the members, 'I wonder what took us so long to get to Lancaster,' " championship director Ben Kimball said Monday at a media day for the event.
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