CollectionsSettings
IN THE NEWS

Settings

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
October 19, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
For many of us, setting a table for company means hunting around the house for a tablecloth that isn't stained from the last holiday dinner. The wedding-gift dishes, the cutlery that requires polishing, the most fragile glassware and the cloth napkins come out of storage. The idle dining room comes to life. There's a certain comfort in seeing the "good" china and silverware a few times a year, but special-occasion tables need not look the same every time. You don't make the same meal for every holiday or every dinner party, so why set the table the same way?
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware County Council is expected to approve a $250-an-hour contract today with an Ardmore psychiatrist who will review the placements of community-bound patients from Haverford State Hospital as it proceeds toward its shutdown in June. Joseph DiGiacomo, who is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, will also perform spot checks of diagnoses as part of the agreement. His fees will be capped at $12,500, plus out-of-pocket expenses.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A decade ago, working amid the whirring machines and chatter of a busy warehouse would have been an impossibility for Linda Miller. But these days, the exuberant 40-year-old stands among colleagues who laud her as a valuable worker and talks about working at Harcourt Education Group, a textbook publisher here. "It's a good job," she said, watching a textbook snake along a series of conveyor belts. "I like to go to work every day. " Miller, who is developmentally disabled, is one of a growing number of people employed in traditional workplaces after years spent in so-called sheltered settings, which employ only disabled individuals and provide extensive support services.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2003 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a not-too-risky prediction about what Ikea has planned for you with the layout of its new store, which is scheduled to open next week in Conshohocken: You will buy something you didn't know you wanted or needed. It could be a 95-cent plastic dish brush - in a variety of colors - with a smiley face on the handle. Or maybe napkins, a tablecloth, china, and a dining table - some assembly required on the table - to put them on. Ikea, the Swedish company that experts call the world's largest furniture retailer, has been a staple in the Philadelphia area since it opened its first North American store in Plymouth Meeting in 1985.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As part of Delaware County's effort to find community-based housing for former Haverford State Hospital residents, the County Council is expected today to approve $2.8 million in new funding for two mental-health care providers. The contract increases being awarded to Elwyn Inc. in Middletown and Philadelphia-based Horizon House are part of a pattern. Since the hospital closed in June, millions of dollars in state and federal funds for mental-health care have been redirected to nonprofit subcontractors that run group homes where former Haverford State patients are being resettled.
TRAVEL
July 21, 2013
ThermaCell makes electronic bug-repelling devices that usually use a repellent substance activated by heat from a replaceable butane cartridge. Now the company has designed a bug banisher that multitasks as an outdoor lantern. Eight LED lights with low and high settings run on 4 AA batteries (not included). The included butane cartridge heats an included insect repellent pad, thwarting mosquitos and other flying insects for up to 15 square feet. The lantern has on/off settings and a button to activate the butane cartridge.
NEWS
March 4, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Sonus, a Baltimore ensemble whose members include a singer, a pianist and a flutist, made its second visit to Philadelphia Monday night in a concert at the Ethical Society. I wish I'd enjoyed it more, for despite the plethora of local and international chamber groups playing here it is always good to hear what musicians in neighboring cities are doing. Dedicated to innovative programs, Sonus themes events around a musical or extra-musical idea, making sure to include scores you don't hear all the time, that is, many from the current century.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
I'M TIRED of hearing Second Amendment advocates defend this right so absolutely in the face of our city's gun violence. It's true that guns by themselves aren't a problem. But in settings where social, emotional, drug or economic issues are dire, the option of having an instrument in your hands that lets you make a split-second, impulsive, deadly decision shouldn't exist! When toddlers and mothers are fair game for shootings, I think the solution is obvious: Get these guns off our streets!
NEWS
June 17, 2013
D EAR ABBY: My husband and I have five kids, all under 6 years of age. The youngest are 7-month-old twins. A family in our church has offered to watch them so my husband and I can go out on a date. We haven't been alone together in a year. I would like to accept their kind offer, but two things are holding me back. First, I don't think they realize the enormity of the task. Second, I don't have anything to say to my husband. A date would be awkward and most likely consist of "relations.
NEWS
June 17, 2002 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Beth Orton's gift is her beautifully languid, melancholy voice; her talent is to situate her vocals within richly textured settings. Although she's a folkie at heart, she maintains roots in electronica, where her warm voice provides a humanizing contrast to synthetic beats. Friday at the sold-out Theater of Living Arts, the British singer-songwriter showcased both sides of her character. With her longtime quartet augmented by under-utilized violin and cello, Orton debuted most of the excellent Daybreaker (Astralwerks, due July 30)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A controversial and much-litigated natural gas pipeline project will likely face new challenges next week when the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection hosts the first of two wetlands hearings related to the proposed "Southern Reliability Link" route. New Jersey Natural Gas (NJNG) is seeking to build a 30-mile, 30-inch pipeline that would start in Chesterfield Township in Burlington County, pass through protected Pinelands on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, and terminate in Manchester Township in Ocean County.
REAL_ESTATE
August 15, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. You get a lot of house for the money here. Real estate agents will say that about any number of places. But it's definitely true when you're talking about West Norriton. Seventy-five of the 100 houses that sold in this Montgomery County township between April and June were priced under $200,000, and "the older singles are four bedrooms and 21/2 baths," says veteran Realtor Gary Segal, of Keller Williams Real Estate in Blue Bell.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A Burlington County woman and her son, killed by her husband in a murder-suicide this week, will be remembered at a memorial service Sunday. MaShanda Johnson, 48, of Burlington Township, and Ruben "Tré" Johnson III, 10, were shot by her husband, Ruben Johnson Jr., Monday night before he turned the gun on himself, authorities said. Authorities have not disclosed a possible motive for the killings, which stunned neighbors and friends. The couple had financial problems and a troubled marriage, friends say. Their $500,000 home on Sunflower Circle, purchased in 2005, was up for sheriff's sale in October, records say. Neighbors recalled MaShanda Johnson as a doting mother of two. A daughter, LoraVon, 23, lives in Florida.
SPORTS
August 12, 2016 | By Paul Schwedelson, STAFF WRITER
Darrell Hill's path to the Rio Olympics started because Penn Wood High School needed a shot putter. Coach Lenny Jordan's pitch to Hill was that he could come to the meets, throw a ball and hang out the rest of the day. Hill's friends were on the team, so it sounded like fun. "I had no clue at all" what to do, Hill said. "This was something I literally just did because my friends were at the meet. " Next Thursday, Hill's winding path will place him in the Olympic shot put competition as he represents the United States in Rio de Janeiro.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
'We're taking down the swing set. " Amy said it so quickly it was almost lost in the rush of conversation. I know this pronouncement by my daughter is hardly the stuff of high drama. But in an instant, a thousand images flashed - images of Amy herself on a swing, sailing skyward and begging me to push her "higher than the clouds. " The middle sister of three, Amy was the family daredevil, the one who made me want to hide my eyes every time she got on a swing. But I never did because I was the swing warden.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
ISSUE | MEDIA John E. McMullan set the Inquirer's course John E. McMullan, who died Monday in Cutler Bay, Fla., at age 95, was a key figure in the transition of the Philadelphia Inquirer from the Walter Annenberg days to today. He took over the scandal-plagued Inquirer on Jan. 1, 1970, at age 48 for Knight Newspapers and immediately improved it. Annenberg's Inquirer had a history of feuding with prominent figures he disliked, including gubernatorial candidate Milton J. Shapp.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge has set May 1 for the retrial of Msgr. William J. Lynn, the first Catholic Church official in the nation to be convicted over his supervision of priests accused of sexually abusing children. Lynn, 65, who was released from state prison Tuesday on $250,000 bail, said nothing during the brief hearing Thursday before Common Pleas Court Judge Gwendolyn N. Bright. Unlike previous court appearances, in which he dressed in the black suit and Roman collar of a Catholic priest, Lynn entered court in dark slacks and a light blue polo shirt, looking thinner than at his first trial in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
Ask Polly Edelstein, artistic director of the Philadelphia Women's Theatre Festival, why female voices are important in the performing arts, and you'll get a sigh. "Oh, gosh, how long do you have?" Edelstein's festival was "born over drinks" in 2014, when she and friend Christine Petrini brainstormed about how best to help Philadelphia's talented female directors and playwrights. They lamented the gross disproportion of male to female leaders in theater, and they decided that, instead of opening their own company, they would throw a yearly event that highlighted women in the community.
NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A celebration of life will be held Wednesday, Aug. 3, for Russell E. Miller 3d, 90, formerly of Clifton Heights, a Realtor, radio show host, and writer, who died July 13 of a heart ailment in a hospice in Fort Myers, Fla. He had moved to Fort Myers 12 years ago. Born to Florence and Russell Miller Jr. in Philadelphia, Mr. Miller grew up on a farm in Ambler. He was self-educated, and, as a result, he became something of a Renaissance man, his family said. He served in the Coast Guard during World War II. Afterward, he built a career as a Realtor, and with his wife, Winifred V. Miller, he taught lawyers about real estate and estate planning.
SPORTS
August 2, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Kelly Whaley liked playing golf when she was a child but didn't always listen to everything her parents told her about the game, even if her mother, a former LPGA tour player who made history by competing in a PGA Tour event, was one of the top teaching pros in the country. "We did butt heads a lot," she said. But Whaley, 19, the daughter of Suzy Whaley, a former West Chester resident who is secretary of the PGA of America, accepted the advice and has developed into a fine college player.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|