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FOOD
October 19, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
For many of us, setting a table for company means hunting around the house for a tablecloth that isn't stained from the last holiday dinner. The wedding-gift dishes, the cutlery that requires polishing, the most fragile glassware and the cloth napkins come out of storage. The idle dining room comes to life. There's a certain comfort in seeing the "good" china and silverware a few times a year, but special-occasion tables need not look the same every time. You don't make the same meal for every holiday or every dinner party, so why set the table the same way?
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware County Council is expected to approve a $250-an-hour contract today with an Ardmore psychiatrist who will review the placements of community-bound patients from Haverford State Hospital as it proceeds toward its shutdown in June. Joseph DiGiacomo, who is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, will also perform spot checks of diagnoses as part of the agreement. His fees will be capped at $12,500, plus out-of-pocket expenses.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A decade ago, working amid the whirring machines and chatter of a busy warehouse would have been an impossibility for Linda Miller. But these days, the exuberant 40-year-old stands among colleagues who laud her as a valuable worker and talks about working at Harcourt Education Group, a textbook publisher here. "It's a good job," she said, watching a textbook snake along a series of conveyor belts. "I like to go to work every day. " Miller, who is developmentally disabled, is one of a growing number of people employed in traditional workplaces after years spent in so-called sheltered settings, which employ only disabled individuals and provide extensive support services.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2003 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's a not-too-risky prediction about what Ikea has planned for you with the layout of its new store, which is scheduled to open next week in Conshohocken: You will buy something you didn't know you wanted or needed. It could be a 95-cent plastic dish brush - in a variety of colors - with a smiley face on the handle. Or maybe napkins, a tablecloth, china, and a dining table - some assembly required on the table - to put them on. Ikea, the Swedish company that experts call the world's largest furniture retailer, has been a staple in the Philadelphia area since it opened its first North American store in Plymouth Meeting in 1985.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As part of Delaware County's effort to find community-based housing for former Haverford State Hospital residents, the County Council is expected today to approve $2.8 million in new funding for two mental-health care providers. The contract increases being awarded to Elwyn Inc. in Middletown and Philadelphia-based Horizon House are part of a pattern. Since the hospital closed in June, millions of dollars in state and federal funds for mental-health care have been redirected to nonprofit subcontractors that run group homes where former Haverford State patients are being resettled.
TRAVEL
July 21, 2013
ThermaCell makes electronic bug-repelling devices that usually use a repellent substance activated by heat from a replaceable butane cartridge. Now the company has designed a bug banisher that multitasks as an outdoor lantern. Eight LED lights with low and high settings run on 4 AA batteries (not included). The included butane cartridge heats an included insect repellent pad, thwarting mosquitos and other flying insects for up to 15 square feet. The lantern has on/off settings and a button to activate the butane cartridge.
NEWS
March 4, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Sonus, a Baltimore ensemble whose members include a singer, a pianist and a flutist, made its second visit to Philadelphia Monday night in a concert at the Ethical Society. I wish I'd enjoyed it more, for despite the plethora of local and international chamber groups playing here it is always good to hear what musicians in neighboring cities are doing. Dedicated to innovative programs, Sonus themes events around a musical or extra-musical idea, making sure to include scores you don't hear all the time, that is, many from the current century.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
I'M TIRED of hearing Second Amendment advocates defend this right so absolutely in the face of our city's gun violence. It's true that guns by themselves aren't a problem. But in settings where social, emotional, drug or economic issues are dire, the option of having an instrument in your hands that lets you make a split-second, impulsive, deadly decision shouldn't exist! When toddlers and mothers are fair game for shootings, I think the solution is obvious: Get these guns off our streets!
NEWS
June 17, 2013
D EAR ABBY: My husband and I have five kids, all under 6 years of age. The youngest are 7-month-old twins. A family in our church has offered to watch them so my husband and I can go out on a date. We haven't been alone together in a year. I would like to accept their kind offer, but two things are holding me back. First, I don't think they realize the enormity of the task. Second, I don't have anything to say to my husband. A date would be awkward and most likely consist of "relations.
NEWS
June 17, 2002 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Beth Orton's gift is her beautifully languid, melancholy voice; her talent is to situate her vocals within richly textured settings. Although she's a folkie at heart, she maintains roots in electronica, where her warm voice provides a humanizing contrast to synthetic beats. Friday at the sold-out Theater of Living Arts, the British singer-songwriter showcased both sides of her character. With her longtime quartet augmented by under-utilized violin and cello, Orton debuted most of the excellent Daybreaker (Astralwerks, due July 30)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Every morning, my iPhone reminds me to log in my food choices for the day, courtesy of a weight-loss app. The messages are pretty innocuous: "Don't let hump day get you down! Log in now!" "Eat your veggies!" And depending on my mood, I see them as encouraging or annoying. But the real stumper is whether or not they change my behavior, a question also posed by researchers who are trying to harness cellphone technology to improve diabetes care. "With 92 percent of the population in the U.S. carrying cellphones, the technology is ubiquitous," said Janice Miller, a diabetes educator and assistant professor at the College of Nursing at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Philadelphia Gas Works has notified 500,000 customers that it is open to competition. But it's the public-utility version of setting a table, inviting guests for a banquet, then offering them nothing to eat. Despite years of preparation and millions spent to remove obstacles to competition, no other gas suppliers have extended offers to PGW's residential customers. "Residential-market conditions are not ideal for competitive suppliers in PGW territory," said Bernie Tylor, a spokesman for WGL Energy Services, a District of Columbia supplier active in other parts of Pennsylvania.
SPORTS
September 11, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, STAFF WRITER
The jerseys have been printed and the players have dusted off their cleats. It's play time. More than 800 amateur soccer players will compete in the city's first International Unity Cup this fall, starting Friday. Thirty-two teams have signed up, composed of immigrants or descendants of each team's country. The idea for the tournament came from Mayor Kenney, who wanted to imitate the World Cup as a way to bring people of all backgrounds and races together in Philadelphia. "This tournament is just one way we are working to make sure newcomers feel that they are a part of the social, cultural, and civic fabric of our city," Kenney said at Friday's kickoff announcement.
SPORTS
September 10, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Jordan Matthews never missed a football game in his life until he sat the entire preseason with a knee injury. All along, he was confident he would return for the season opener. And in the days before the Eagles host the Cleveland Browns on Sunday, the coaches can comfortably prepare knowing they will have their No. 1 wide receiver back on the field. Matthews' return bolsters a wide receiving corps that lacks experience - and production - outside of Matthews, who fell three yards shy of 1,000 yards last season, when he led the Eagles in receiving.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission will vote later this month on changes that would eliminate the need for pay-TV consumers to rent set-top boxes, potentially saving millions of American households about $230 a year each, agency officials said. An FCC proposal that was circulated Thursday to top agency officials would force pay-TV operators to make available free apps that grant consumers access to their entertainment offerings and channels. The apps would be loaded onto Roku boxes, Amazon Fire TV Sticks, Apple Inc. devices, or other platforms, including gaming consoles and smartphones, FCC officials said Thursday.
SPORTS
September 7, 2016 | By Les Bowen, Staff Writer
THEY GOT the news in different ways. Zach Ertz got an 8 a.m. call from Sam Bradford. Rodney McLeod was watching the college football pregame show when the crawl across the bottom of the screen informed him that his team's starting quarterback had been traded. Bryan Braman saw it on Twitter. Wentz himself, memorably, told reporters Monday he'd been lying "in a cornfield . . . somewhere in Jersey," early Saturday morning, hunting geese, when Eagles coach Doug Pederson called to tell him Bradford had been traded to the Minnesota Vikings.
NEWS
September 4, 2016
Services have been set for Albert John Snite Jr., 68, of East Falls, a retired Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge, who died Wednesday, Aug. 31, of complications from lung cancer at his home. A visitation starting at 9:30 a.m. Friday, Sept. 9, will be followed by a memorial service at 11 a.m., both at the First United Methodist Church of Germantown, 6001 Germantown Ave. Burial is private. From January 1992 to January 2015, Judge Snite presided over cases from the state court's First Judicial District bench in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 3, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
The organs of an 8-year-old girl who was fatally shot while playing across the street from her Camden home last week have been donated, including her liver, which went to a cousin. Also, Gabrielle Hill Carter's mother, Meresa Carter Phillips, gave birth to another child Tuesday, and named him King Gabriel. Gabrielle was playing on the sidewalk just before 8:30 p.m. Aug. 24 across from her house on the 900 block of South Eighth Street when several men opened fire on another man. One of the bullets struck her in the head.
SPORTS
August 31, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Penn State coach James Franklin was listing the attributes of what makes Saquon Barkley a special running back before summing it up this way: "The good Lord doesn't give you everything. For whatever reason, he's been given more than most. " It didn't take Barkley very long - the second game of his collegiate career, to be exact - before he exhibited one of those special gifts. With the Nittany Lions driving deep into Buffalo territory, he took a handoff and hurdled free safety Ryan Williamson on his way to a 17-yard gain.
SPORTS
August 25, 2016 | By Rick O'Brien, STAFF WRITER
Downingtown East coach Mike Matta lost a number of key offensive starters to graduation, including a pair of Division I recruits, a 1,000-yard rusher and a savvy quarterback. But a stalwart defensive line, possibly the best since the program started in 2003, has Matta optimistic about continued success for the Cougars. "We're big up front. We have guys who are really quick off the ball, and there's a good amount of experience there," he said. Coaches realize that defensive line play is often the difference between winning and losing.
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