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Settlement Music School

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NEWS
May 6, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If music is a rearrangement of something gone before, David Sanford's sources are as eclectic as Mahler's. The 29-year-old Pittsburgh native heard his Chamber Concerto No. 3 premiered Monday by Speculum Musicae in the new music series at the Settlement Music School. Sanford explained before the performance that he was grappling with 12-tone writing and its tonal applications and, in this work, with his flirtation with Schumann's Manfred, and with an irresistible tune - and its harmonic implications - by Charlie Mingus and Jack Walrath.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Settlement Music School in Philadelphia has received the largest grant in its history - $1 million - to expand an innovative program for the handicapped that provides 800 students with therapy, education and social interaction. The $1 million grant is from the Samuel and Rebecca Kardon Foundation in Philadelphia, which is headed by Emanuel S. Kardon, chairman of American Packaging Co. and a longtime supporter of the 78-year-old school. "We just received the grant this month; it is specifically for our nationally recognized program for the handicapped," said James McClelland, director of development at the school, whose main branch is at 416 Queen St. in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Settlement Music School has done something it has rarely had to do in its 102-year history: hire a new executive director. Helen Eaton, 40, president and executive director of the Chicago Children's Choir, has been named to succeed Robert Capanna, who retired Dec. 31 after a 27-year tenure. When she starts at the end of August, Eaton will be only the sixth director of the school. The move from a children's choir to a community music school is not as far a leap as it might seem. The Chicago group serves more than 2,800 singers in its choirs and through programs in 45 schools.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Whatever stereotypes are current about Russian string playing were jostled last night when cellist Misha Quint and pianist Dmitri Rachmanov played their local debuts at the Settlement Music School. Quint, 30-year-old Leningrad native, and Rachmanov, 32, a Muscovite, had specialized in new Soviet music before leaving to take up residence in New York. Their program last night, sponsored by the Network for New Music, included the first local performance of Alfred Schnittke's Sonata, as well as the premiere of Philadelphian Matthew Greenbaum's Ordre (1990)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
Of all the former students of Settlement Music School who have been chosen for the centennial-celebrating Settlement 100, a selection of alums with interesting postgraduation stories to relate, Robert Capanna, the school's executive director, nominates John Blake as "Mr. Settlement Music School. " Not only did the jazz violinist attend the school, but so did his four brothers and sisters. And Blake has returned many times throughout the years to help promote music education for young people.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James J. Baumann, 59, of Westbrook Park, an Acme Markets worker who, despite being blinded at an early age, led a life filled with activity and optimism, died Saturday, March 28, of cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Known as Jimmy, Mr. Baumann attended Holy Cross School in Springfield, Delaware County, and graduated from Upper Darby High School in 1973. At age 18, while he and a friend were playing with a shotgun in Chestnut Hill, the gun discharged accidentally, hitting him in the head.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial is set for Sunday, March 8, for Randall Booker Haskins, 56, a FedEx delivery man and music lover, who died Monday, Jan. 26, of heart failure from complications of bronchitis and asthma. Mr. Haskins, a Mount Airy native and resident, died at his home. His mother, Yvonne, is a real estate lawyer, city revitalization specialist, and community volunteer; her husband, Harold, is a retired University of Pennsylvania administrator and a filmmaker. Their son, a popular high school student, never took himself too seriously: his name appears as Randy "Fonz" Haskins on his 1976 diploma from Germantown High School, a reference to the character on TV's Happy Days.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
A leadership and administrative change in the School District of Philadelphia's venerable All City Music Festival could signal the start of the program's restoration. Project 440, the education group founded in 2006 by Philadelphia Orchestra assistant double bassist Joseph Conyers, is taking over management of the All City program from the School District. The legal aspects of the transfer may take months to complete, but a ceremonial handshake sealing the deal is planned on stage at this year's All City concert on Monday.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Italo Taranta, 86, of Drexel Hill, a music teacher, composer, and choral director, died Tuesday, Nov. 4, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at home. Born in Paganica in southern Italy, Mr. Taranta came to the United States as an infant and settled with his parents in southeastern Ohio before moving to Michigan. His parents had a difficult relationship; he escaped into the solace of music, although he struggled for years with migraine headaches and depression. "Rarely was there ever a person more passionate about something than my dad was about classical music.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE children of the Blake household in South Philly turned 6, they took piano lessons. "There were no ifs, ands or buts about it," said one of those kids, Charlotte Blake Alston. "You played the piano. " It was an edict from their mother, Carrie Blake, a church organist who knew the value of music to the human soul. Their father was a very literate letter carrier. Another of Carrie's children was John Blake Jr., who became an internationally renowned jazz violinist. He always acknowledged that his love of music began in the pews of Holy Trinity Baptist Church in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
John Blake Jr., 67, the Philadelphia jazz violinist and music educator who toured with Grover Washington Jr. and McCoy Tyner, and taught generations of students at the Settlement Music School and the University of the Arts, has died. Mr. Blake died Friday, Aug. 15, from complications of multiple myeloma, according to his son, Johnathan. The jazz man grew up in South Philadelphia, and studied violin and piano at Settlement before graduating from West Virginia University with a music degree and going on to the Institute of Advanced Studies in Montreux, Switzerland.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The premise is simple: David Uosikkinen leads his bandmates in the Hooters, along with a coterie of this city's finest rock-and-soul players, through a project of his own devising, a catalog of his favorite Philadelphia-rooted songs. You can argue with Uosikkinen's choices, but you can't argue with his enthusiasm or reach ("I Ain't Searchin' ", from Philly late-1960s favorite the American Dream is alone worth the price of admission). Under the moniker In the Pocket, Uosikkinen's shifting collective ensemble released its tracks online (to benefit the Settlement Music School)
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
For four years, Ellie D. Brown has been trying to determine whether an early education in the arts enhances children's ability to learn overall, and again and again she has turned to an unlikely tool of inquiry: a small swab of sponge. More than 24,000 times, the West Chester University associate professor of psychology and her colleagues have reached into the mouths of 500 children at Settlement Music School's Kaleidoscope Head Start program and a nearby control school to measure cortisol, the hormone associated with stress levels.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
Bloody street riots changed the context of Lydia Artymiw's recital Thursday at the American Philosophical Society. The Philadelphia-born pianist submitted her program a year ago to showcase music by five Ukrainian composers as part of her own heritage. Events in Kiev transformed these works from a personal statement of cultural brotherhood to an elegy for a nation in pain. The five pieces, in minor keys and modal echoes written in the 19th and 20th centuries, etched a portrait of sorrow, frost, and snow.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In July, trumpeter Wallace Roney and a big band debuted "Universe," a piece that saxophonist Wayne Shorter wrote in 1968 for the Miles Davis Quintet, plus orchestra. Shorter had thought the piece was lost. In time, he found it and sent it to Roney, who worked for years to give it a proper birthing before succeeding at the Jazz Standard in New York. "We've been turned down by every record company, but we're trying," Roney said of the long-form, tuneful piece, which pulses with flutes, French and English horns, and bassoon.
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