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Settlement Music School

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NEWS
May 6, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If music is a rearrangement of something gone before, David Sanford's sources are as eclectic as Mahler's. The 29-year-old Pittsburgh native heard his Chamber Concerto No. 3 premiered Monday by Speculum Musicae in the new music series at the Settlement Music School. Sanford explained before the performance that he was grappling with 12-tone writing and its tonal applications and, in this work, with his flirtation with Schumann's Manfred, and with an irresistible tune - and its harmonic implications - by Charlie Mingus and Jack Walrath.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Settlement Music School in Philadelphia has received the largest grant in its history - $1 million - to expand an innovative program for the handicapped that provides 800 students with therapy, education and social interaction. The $1 million grant is from the Samuel and Rebecca Kardon Foundation in Philadelphia, which is headed by Emanuel S. Kardon, chairman of American Packaging Co. and a longtime supporter of the 78-year-old school. "We just received the grant this month; it is specifically for our nationally recognized program for the handicapped," said James McClelland, director of development at the school, whose main branch is at 416 Queen St. in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Settlement Music School has done something it has rarely had to do in its 102-year history: hire a new executive director. Helen Eaton, 40, president and executive director of the Chicago Children's Choir, has been named to succeed Robert Capanna, who retired Dec. 31 after a 27-year tenure. When she starts at the end of August, Eaton will be only the sixth director of the school. The move from a children's choir to a community music school is not as far a leap as it might seem. The Chicago group serves more than 2,800 singers in its choirs and through programs in 45 schools.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Whatever stereotypes are current about Russian string playing were jostled last night when cellist Misha Quint and pianist Dmitri Rachmanov played their local debuts at the Settlement Music School. Quint, 30-year-old Leningrad native, and Rachmanov, 32, a Muscovite, had specialized in new Soviet music before leaving to take up residence in New York. Their program last night, sponsored by the Network for New Music, included the first local performance of Alfred Schnittke's Sonata, as well as the premiere of Philadelphian Matthew Greenbaum's Ordre (1990)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
Of all the former students of Settlement Music School who have been chosen for the centennial-celebrating Settlement 100, a selection of alums with interesting postgraduation stories to relate, Robert Capanna, the school's executive director, nominates John Blake as "Mr. Settlement Music School. " Not only did the jazz violinist attend the school, but so did his four brothers and sisters. And Blake has returned many times throughout the years to help promote music education for young people.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2016 | STAFF
NOTE: The Philadelphia Irish Festival, which was originally included on our list, has been postponed until Sunday, June 26.  Need something to do this weekend? Don't worry, we've got you covered. KIDS Through June 4, Annenberg Center , 3680 Walnut St. $10 per show, 215-898-3900. This venerable fest returns with circus arts, music, theater, plus an outdoor Fun Zone with interactive performances and activities (9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Milton Babbitt (1916-2011) is one of the most infamously experimental American composers of the 20th century - but he hasn't exactly been a magnet for posthumous idolization. So Network for New Music seemed admirably fearless with a Sunday concert titled "All the Things He Was," showing why some consider the Philadelphia-born composer deeply misunderstood. With his thick black glasses and slightly smug smile, the über-modernist Babbitt seemed to treat music like mathematical rocket science.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Kathryn Baily Westman, 95, of Narberth, an opera singer and voice teacher to generations of Philadelphia area music students, died Thursday, March 24, of a pulmonary embolism at Lankenau Medical Center. Mrs. Westman was known for her beautiful soprano voice, her service to the tiny Montgomery County borough of Narberth, and her love of life, her family said. Her musical career began early in the family home on Dudley Avenue. Her mother, Mildred W. Baily, was a teacher of piano and voice who held musical evenings in which her children participated.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ida Newman, 101, of Philadelphia, a mother whose loss of her only child kindled a philanthropic journey to benefit children, students, doctors, musicians, artists, and uninsured women, died Sunday, Nov. 22. Mrs. Newman was a month shy of her 102d birthday when she died at home of causes related to aging, her family said. She had been mentally sharp until late last week. "Philadelphia has lost a lifelong resident who through generous philanthropy changed the lives of many in her nearly 102 years, and will be remembered for even longer," the family said.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2015
The People's Light , a professional nonprofit theater in Malvern, has named the following board members: John E. Barth, senior vice president of corporate banking, PNC Bank; Kathleen C. Gubanich, managing director of human resources at Vanguard; Jessie Mooberry, vice director of Uplift Aeronautics; and Nabila Sajid, senior vice president and commercial and industrial team lending team leader at DNB First. Mina Fader has been elected the chair of Einstein's Physician Services Board. She is the chief financial officer for Germantown Friends School.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John T. "Bunky" deVecchis Jr., 78, of Queen Village, an early South Street store owner and a photographer to Philadelphia's jazz greats, died at home Wednesday, April 22. The cause of death was progressive supranuclear palsy, a rare brain disorder that takes away the ability to walk and communicate while leaving the patient alert. A native Philadelphian, he captured the city's jazz scene for a quarter century, toting his Leica rangefinder camera. His black-and-white images depicted the smoky immediacy of the performers at night spots such as Zanzibar Blue, Chris Jazz Café, Ortliebs Jazzhaus, and the Clef Club.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James J. Baumann, 59, of Westbrook Park, an Acme Markets worker who, despite being blinded at an early age, led a life filled with activity and optimism, died Saturday, March 28, of cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Known as Jimmy, Mr. Baumann attended Holy Cross School in Springfield, Delaware County, and graduated from Upper Darby High School in 1973. At age 18, while he and a friend were playing with a shotgun in Chestnut Hill, the gun discharged accidentally, hitting him in the head.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial is set for Sunday, March 8, for Randall Booker Haskins, 56, a FedEx delivery man and music lover, who died Monday, Jan. 26, of heart failure from complications of bronchitis and asthma. Mr. Haskins, a Mount Airy native and resident, died at his home. His mother, Yvonne, is a real estate lawyer, city revitalization specialist, and community volunteer; her husband, Harold, is a retired University of Pennsylvania administrator and a filmmaker. Their son, a popular high school student, never took himself too seriously: his name appears as Randy "Fonz" Haskins on his 1976 diploma from Germantown High School, a reference to the character on TV's Happy Days.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
A leadership and administrative change in the School District of Philadelphia's venerable All City Music Festival could signal the start of the program's restoration. Project 440, the education group founded in 2006 by Philadelphia Orchestra assistant double bassist Joseph Conyers, is taking over management of the All City program from the School District. The legal aspects of the transfer may take months to complete, but a ceremonial handshake sealing the deal is planned on stage at this year's All City concert on Monday.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Italo Taranta, 86, of Drexel Hill, a music teacher, composer, and choral director, died Tuesday, Nov. 4, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at home. Born in Paganica in southern Italy, Mr. Taranta came to the United States as an infant and settled with his parents in southeastern Ohio before moving to Michigan. His parents had a difficult relationship; he escaped into the solace of music, although he struggled for years with migraine headaches and depression. "Rarely was there ever a person more passionate about something than my dad was about classical music.
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