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Settlement Offer

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NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The federal judge in the case of 88 people suing Camden after their drug convictions were tossed out because of police corruption is giving them until Dec. 5 to decide whether they want to take part in a proposed $3.5 million settlement. In an order issued Friday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider gave the plaintiffs' lawyers until Dec. 10 to inform the court which of their clients did not respond and which elected - or declined - to participate. But lawyers for both sides cautioned that while the framework of a settlement was in place, the price tag was not fixed and another major obstacle must be overcome before any deal can be finalized.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Cindy Anders, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Three taxpayers who sued the Coatesville Area School Board for alleged violation of the state open-meetings law and mismanagement of funds put a settlement offer on the table last week. Now, they're impatiently waiting to see how the board likes the dish. Almost a month after a hearing, Chester County Court Judge Leonard Sugerman met in chambers with Samuel Stretton, the taxpayers' lawyer, and two attorneys for the school board. Sugerman said he asked Stretton to put forward a settlement offer.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Federal Trade Commission has rejected a settlement offer from Rite Aid Corp. and plans to sue to block the drug retailer's proposed merger with Revco D.S. Inc. by Friday, when Rite Aid's $1.8 billion tender offer is scheduled to expire. Rite Aid, of Camp Hill, Pa., had proposed selling about 340 of its drugstores in an attempt to overcome the FTC's antitrust objections to the merger with Ohio-based Revco. Rite Aid chairman Martin Grass said he believed the offer would meet government requirements that any merged company not control more than 35 percent of the chain pharmacies in any area.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Charlestown Township - eager to conserve its resources - has offered to settle a $1.4 million lawsuit filed against the municipality by a developer. "In view of our legal-services bill, . . . which shows we spent around $15,000 or more in legal fees on Charlestown Hunt, we prepared a settlement offer which would resolve all the issues," said Township Supervisor John Martin. "There's no purpose (in continuing litigation). We are just consuming taxpayers' money at an astronomical rate.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
A fraternal group of minority police officers last night postponed discussion of Camden Mayor Randy Primas' settlement offer in a discrimination suit until its attorney reviewed the proposal. In the suit, filed last October, the Brotherhood for Unity and Progress (BUP) contended that the city's testing and promotional system for police officers discriminates against minorities. Primas this week said he would promote 15 white officers and 11 minority officers to supervisory positions, change the promotional testing system and offer coaching for promotional tests.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Residents who went to court over the Jewish Federation's plans to put a six-story apartment building in their Cherry Hill neighborhood have rejected a settlement offer that would have reduced the height of the building, attorneys in the case said yesterday. In the proposed compromise, negotiated during the last few weeks by Mayor Susan Bass Levin, the federation agreed to scale down its planned low-income apartment building from six stories to five if the residents dropped the lawsuit.
NEWS
May 13, 1989 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden minority police officers involved in a discrimination suit that has frozen most promotions since January 1988 this week approved a settlement offer that would promote 12 minorities and 21 whites to supervisory posts. The settlement offer, initiated by the city administration, calls for promoting 21 whites, nine blacks, two Hispanics and one Asian. The Brotherhood for Unity and Progress, a fraternity of minority police in the city, approved the package Wednesday. City officials said they would ask a federal judge to accept the settlement package, although the Coalition of Concerned Police Officers - a coalition of mostly white officers who intervened last year in the suit - rejected the settlement yesterday by a vote of 67-5.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a dramatic shareholder showdown just days away, Charming Shoppes Inc. said yesterday that dissident investors had rejected its offer to settle a proxy fight. Activists will try to boot the chief executive officer and two other members from the board on Thursday. The Bensalem women's specialty-apparel company, which operates the Lane Bryant and Fashion Bug chains, said that it would support one of three dissident nominees to its board - retail-turnaround specialist Michael C. Appel - but that it wanted shareholders to fill the other two slots with two of its own incumbents, including chief executive Dorrit J. Bern.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly two weeks after Cherry Hill Mayor Susan Bass Levin publicly disclosed a $17 million settlement offer by lawyer Peter J. O'Connor to end a lawsuit over affordable housing, O'Connor and his clients have denounced Levin's account as "a vicious falsehood. " In a written statement, O'Connor said the mayor's description of the settlement offer was "completely inaccurate and misrepresented the position of the plaintiffs. " In an interview yesterday, Levin said she stood by her account and provided notes of the meeting with O'Connor in support of her recollection.
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SPORTS
September 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
An attempt by seven former NFL players to block the league's proposed settlement over concussion-related health problems met with tough questions Wednesday from a federal appeals court panel. Lawyers for the group - which includes former Eagles wide receiver Sean Morey and safety Sean Considine - challenged the fairness of the agreement, alleging that many former players had had their rights "bargained away. " But the three-justice panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit appeared focused on a more basic question: Did it have the right to intervene in the ongoing settlement proceedings or would doing so leapfrog a process already established by the federal judge handling the case for airing complaints?
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling it a "significant improvement" over an earlier proposal, a federal judge in Philadelphia granted preliminary approval Monday to the NFL's second settlement offer to former players who sued the league over concussion-related health problems. The move came six months after U.S. District Judge Anita Brody rejected the first deal put forth by the league. It opens the door for more than 20,000 of the NFL's potentially eligible retirees to pursue claims as part of the class-action settlement.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
VOTER ID is an issue akin to gay marriage, abortion or guns: It hinges on rights, it's vastly divisive and it isn't going away. This week we have the fourth, but surely not the last, legal tussle over whether Pennsylvanians need a photo ID to vote. Current law says they do, but current law isn't enforced. Whether it will be is the subject of a new trial - expected to last more than a week - that began yesterday in Commonwealth Court in Harrisburg. Opening arguments sounded the same as past arguments.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Mark Scolforo and Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
HARRISBURG - The lawyer brought in by Pennsylvania State University to help settle Jerry Sandusky-related claims said Monday that he recently gave university officials monetary settlement offers from most of the people who have asserted that the former assistant football coach had molested them. Ken Feinberg said he delivered the demands to Penn State administrators, lawyers, and members of the board of trustees during a meeting Friday in Philadelphia. "The next step is Penn State.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Conrail is offering cash settlements to Paulsboro residents and businesses impacted by November's leak of toxic vinyl chloride from a ruptured tanker car - if they waive their right to sue the company for health problems they might discover later in life. The five-page settlement agreement says those health effects include, but are not limited to, "any and all of my unknown and unanticipated injuries and damages resulting" from the leak, which was caused by a train derailment that sent four tanker cars into Mantua Creek.
NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Congress on Friday approved $9.7 billion in disaster relief for Sandy. So now what? The money will go to increasing the borrowing limit of the National Flood Insurance Program, through which the federal government underwrites virtually all the flood insurance policies in this country. So far, the program has seen almost 140,000 claims related to Sandy - more than 70,000 in New Jersey alone. And early estimates from the Federal Emergency Management Agency were that those claims would cost from $6 billion to $12 billion.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The federal judge in the case of 88 people suing Camden after their drug convictions were tossed out because of police corruption is giving them until Dec. 5 to decide whether they want to take part in a proposed $3.5 million settlement. In an order issued Friday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider gave the plaintiffs' lawyers until Dec. 10 to inform the court which of their clients did not respond and which elected - or declined - to participate. But lawyers for both sides cautioned that while the framework of a settlement was in place, the price tag was not fixed and another major obstacle must be overcome before any deal can be finalized.
SPORTS
August 8, 2012 | Associated Press
Terrell Owens is returning to the NFL after one year on the sidelines. Owens had a tryout with the Seahawks on Monday, and hours later the team announced it had agreed to terms with the 38-year-old receiver. The former Eagle hasn't played in the NFL since 2010, when he caught 72 passes for 983 yards and nine touchdowns with Cincinnati. Owens then had surgery on his left knee and didn't receive any offers to play last season. He had 35 catches for 420 yards and 10 TDs in eight games with the Allen Wranglers of the Indoor Football League.
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