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Seung Hui Cho

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NEWS
March 10, 2012 | By Steve Szkotak, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Virginia Tech's president on Friday defended his actions during the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, saying in court: "I tried my best. " Charles Steger testified for two hours at a trial in the wrongful-death lawsuit brought by the families of two students killed during the April 16, 2007, campus attack. The civil suit contends university officials delayed warning the campus of the first two shootings in a dormitory and then tried to cover up their missteps.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Dena Potter, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - The U.S. Department of Education has scheduled a December hearing to take up Virginia Tech's appeal of fines it received for failing to notify the campus sooner during a 2007 shooting rampage in which a student killed 32 students and faculty. Department spokeswoman Sara Gast said the hearing would take place Dec. 7-9. Several survivors and victims' family members plan to travel to Washington to testify. The school appealed the $55,000 sanction in April. Virginia Tech officials have denied wrongdoing, saying the department was holding them to higher standards than were in place the day of the shootings.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Kimberly Hefling, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sometimes pushing back tears, the parents of victims in the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting testified Wednesday that they believe their children would have stayed in a safe place, far away from where they were later shot, if they had had more information from the university about a safety threat on campus. That threat was connected to a double shooting in a campus dorm that morning. An administrative judge is considering Virginia Tech's appeal of a $55,000 fine levied by the Education Department after the April 16, 2007, shootings, which left 33 dead, including the shooter.
NEWS
May 19, 2010
U.S. says Va. Tech broke security law RICHMOND, Va. - Virginia Tech broke federal campus security laws by waiting too long to notify students during the deadliest shooting rampage in modern U.S. history, the U.S. Education Department said in a preliminary report released Tuesday. The school disputed the findings, saying that its officials met standards in effect at the time of the April 16, 2007, shootings and that the report was colored by "hindsight bias. " The mentally ill gunman, student Seung-Hui Cho, killed 32 people before committing suicide.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
You don't need to pass college history to learn a great deal from all of the tragic mistakes made prior to the nation's worst campus massacre. An exhaustive report on the April 16 Virginia Tech killings, issued last week by Virginia Gov. Timothy M. Kaine, provides the equivalent of a course syllabus for the study of what to do, and not do, in similar life-and-death circumstances. It's the work of a review panel that included former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge. In its detailed recommendations, the panel sets out reforms that could take years and millions of dollars to achieve.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | Associated Press
BLACKSBURG, Va. - A report of a possible gunman at Virginia Tech on Thursday set off the longest, most extensive lockdown and search on campus since the bloodbath four years ago that led the university to overhaul its emergency procedures. No gunman was found, and the school gave the all-clear just before 3 p.m., about five hours after sirens began wailing and students and staff members started receiving warnings by phone, e-mail, and text message to lock themselves indoors. Alerts were also posted on the university's website and Twitter accounts.
NEWS
September 22, 2007 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shots ring out at Delaware State University shortly before 1 a.m. Two students fall to the ground, wounded. Almost immediately, the process of warning students to stay indoors begins. Within hours, the 400-acre campus is locked down and, at 5:10 a.m., classes are canceled as police search for the person or persons responsible for the crimes. Delaware State's swift response to the double shooting on its campus in Dover yesterday was a textbook example of how to handle a crisis, safety experts said.
NEWS
May 1, 2007 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Capus graduated from Temple with a degree in communications, but judging by the last few weeks, he should have majored in crisis management. As president of NBC News, camera-shy Capus has been in the eye of not one but two media hurricanes in which his decisions have been heatedly debated on the national stage. From the ho-rrible (Don Imus) to the horrific (Virginia Tech), Capus found himself in the hot seat twice in short order. "At this point, a slow news week would be as welcome as a beautiful spring day at the end of a harsh winter," says Capus, 43, a Bucks County boy. If that sounds a tad lyrical, well, consider that Capus, a would-be musician since his days at William Tennent High School, still plucks his Rickenbacker electric bass during boring conference calls at NBC. Capus hit a sour note with viewers April 18 when NBC aired portions of the self-made videotape of Virginia Tech shooter Seung-Hui Cho. Capus was accused of being insensitive to the victims' families.
NEWS
April 25, 2007 | Arthur Caplan
Arthur Caplan is the Emanuel & Robert Hart Professor of Bioethics, chair of the department of medical ethics, and director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania It is not just guns. In all my life, I never thought I would write those words after a massacre involving a mass murder with a gun. But a week's worth of intense media coverage of the heinous murders of students and faculty at Virginia Tech and analyses focusing on guns by innumerable experts has left me furious.
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NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
One survivor of the 2007 Virginia Tech University shooting can recall vivid images of the day she was hit by three bullets as a gunman methodically worked his way through her class, "shooting to kill. " On Tuesday, Kristina Anderson, 28, of Washington, offered chilling details of that day and shared its lessons with about 450 law enforcement officers, rescue workers, and education officials gathered at Washington Township High School for the South Jersey School Safety and Security Conference.
NEWS
March 10, 2012 | By Steve Szkotak, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Virginia Tech's president on Friday defended his actions during the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, saying in court: "I tried my best. " Charles Steger testified for two hours at a trial in the wrongful-death lawsuit brought by the families of two students killed during the April 16, 2007, campus attack. The civil suit contends university officials delayed warning the campus of the first two shootings in a dormitory and then tried to cover up their missteps.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Kimberly Hefling, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sometimes pushing back tears, the parents of victims in the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting testified Wednesday that they believe their children would have stayed in a safe place, far away from where they were later shot, if they had had more information from the university about a safety threat on campus. That threat was connected to a double shooting in a campus dorm that morning. An administrative judge is considering Virginia Tech's appeal of a $55,000 fine levied by the Education Department after the April 16, 2007, shootings, which left 33 dead, including the shooter.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Dena Potter, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - The U.S. Department of Education has scheduled a December hearing to take up Virginia Tech's appeal of fines it received for failing to notify the campus sooner during a 2007 shooting rampage in which a student killed 32 students and faculty. Department spokeswoman Sara Gast said the hearing would take place Dec. 7-9. Several survivors and victims' family members plan to travel to Washington to testify. The school appealed the $55,000 sanction in April. Virginia Tech officials have denied wrongdoing, saying the department was holding them to higher standards than were in place the day of the shootings.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | Associated Press
BLACKSBURG, Va. - A report of a possible gunman at Virginia Tech on Thursday set off the longest, most extensive lockdown and search on campus since the bloodbath four years ago that led the university to overhaul its emergency procedures. No gunman was found, and the school gave the all-clear just before 3 p.m., about five hours after sirens began wailing and students and staff members started receiving warnings by phone, e-mail, and text message to lock themselves indoors. Alerts were also posted on the university's website and Twitter accounts.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
Nev. congressman to succeed Ensign CARSON CITY, Nev. - Republican Rep. Dean Heller will enter next year's U.S. Senate race from the perch of incumbency after Gov. Brian Sandoval appointed the congressman Wednesday to succeed Sen. John Ensign. Heller's appointment sets up a political scramble on how his House seat will be filled. State law says a special election must be held within 180 days of a vacancy. Ensign, dogged by an ethics probe after acknowledging having had an extramarital affair with a former staffer, said last week he would resign effective Tuesday, May 3, after previously announcing he would not seek reelection.
NEWS
September 22, 2007 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shots ring out at Delaware State University shortly before 1 a.m. Two students fall to the ground, wounded. Almost immediately, the process of warning students to stay indoors begins. Within hours, the 400-acre campus is locked down and, at 5:10 a.m., classes are canceled as police search for the person or persons responsible for the crimes. Delaware State's swift response to the double shooting on its campus in Dover yesterday was a textbook example of how to handle a crisis, safety experts said.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
You don't need to pass college history to learn a great deal from all of the tragic mistakes made prior to the nation's worst campus massacre. An exhaustive report on the April 16 Virginia Tech killings, issued last week by Virginia Gov. Timothy M. Kaine, provides the equivalent of a course syllabus for the study of what to do, and not do, in similar life-and-death circumstances. It's the work of a review panel that included former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge. In its detailed recommendations, the panel sets out reforms that could take years and millions of dollars to achieve.
NEWS
May 2, 2007 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Purses and backpacks will be banned and metal detectors will be in place when students return to Delaware County Community College today, even though police have not caught the author of two e-mail threats that forced the school to shut on Thursday. Calling the threat "domestic terrorism" that disrupted thousands of lives, Chester County District Attorney Joseph W. Carroll said he believed that the heavy police presence and security precautions would deter any violence. Carroll said evidence suggested that the writer of the e-mails sent Thursday, who threatened "to kill everyone at this damn school," intended to disrupt campus operations rather than end lives.
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