CollectionsSevere Depression
IN THE NEWS

Severe Depression

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
April 12, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Darryl Strawberry is being treated for severe depression, as well as drug addiction and cancer, in St. Petersburg, Fla., and will not learn until next month whether his latest troubles with the law will result in a prison term. Circuit Judge Florence Foster set a May 4 hearing after being told yesterday that it could take the former slugger about three weeks to adjust to new medication. Strawberry has been receiving the new medicine since ending a four-day binge that began after he left a treatment facility where he was under house arrest.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already the poorest big city in America, Philadelphia also has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.2 percent, or nearly 185,000 people, including about 60,000 children. That's almost twice the U.S. deep-poverty rate of 6.3 percent. Camden's deep-poverty rate of 20 percent is more than three times the national mark, but its population is a fraction of Philadelphia's.
NEWS
October 26, 1986
The current fiscal policy of the United States is both dishonest and stupid. It is dishonest because the U.S. government is giving away money to foreign governments that it does not have. Where will the money come from? It will come from our children and grandchildren who will be saddled with this and other debts which are rightfully ours. When someone gives away someone else's money without permission, it is called theft. The policy is stupid and unpatriotic because it subordinates the welfare of the United States to the welfare of foreign governments.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | BY MICHAEL LACING
CAUSE OF DEATH Some not so obvious ways that Americans died in 1990: 218 from heart failure after being told they were being transferred to Detroit. 16 from the shock of seeing Marlon Brando without clothes. 18 from the shock of seeing Boy George in clothes. 1,200 killed after object thrown at television ricochets off and hits them in head during TV appearances of Richard Simmons. 37 from physical exhaustion while working as kitchen help for Oprah Winfrey.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
ALZHEIMER'S SPOUSES. If you care for a spouse with Alzheimer's disease, you're at greater risk of suffering severe depression and other maladies. Ohio State University researchers told the Federal Advisory Panel on Alzheimer's Disease that 30 percent of family "care-givers" they studied suffered depression - a much higher rate than the norm. A marked inability to fend off infection and vulnerability to severe colds, pneumonia, influenza and other upper-respiratory-tract problems also were observed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | Choose one .
DEAR ABBY: When I was 13, I would cut myself. I stopped around 15 after an attempted overdose that didn't work. I did it because my parents were stressed due to money problems and ignored me or yelled at me a lot. I was also bullied in school. Suddenly, in the last week, I have begun binge eating. I see no hope for my life or my future. I wake up wanting to go back to sleep or overdose. My wrists have throbbed at the thought of wanting to cut again, and last night I had a dream of jumping off a building.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Sophia Tareen, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Election Day is five weeks away, and Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. (D., Ill.) remains out of sight. It's an absence, both from his job in Congress and his campaign, that's starting to test patience in his Chicago hometown. More than three months have passed since Jackson, 47, first elected in 1995, dropped out of public sight. It was later revealed that he was hospitalized for severe depression and gastrointestinal problems. There have been few updates on his condition and no hard answers to questions about his future.
SPORTS
August 18, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
A dark depression dogged Donnie Moore when, in 1989, the star-crossed reliever, recently released, put a bullet in his brain. Eighty-two years earlier, Chick Stahl, a .307 lifetime hitter in 10 big-league seasons, ingested a fatal dose of poison in his Indiana hotel room. And it was during a 1940 road trip to Boston when Cincinnati Reds catcher Willard Hershberger sliced his jugular with a razor. Locker rooms are, in many ways, fortresses. The sports sanctuaries are designed to insulate athletes from autograph-seekers, other fans and, for all but brief designated periods, the media.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
People who have a healthy "explanatory style" - who refuse to blame themselves for unpleasant events in their lives - are less likely to become seriously depressed, a University of Pennsylvania researcher said yesterday at a national science convention. "Explanatory style" is a way people have of explaining to themselves bad things that happen to them, Penn psychologist Martin E. P Seligman told a symposium on depression at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 7, 2009 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A hobbled, retired NFL football player is addicted to painkillers. A doctor who has worked closely with the NFL Players Association said the union recognizes that the cycle - first the pain, then the addiction - has become all too familiar among retirees. "It's a violent sport ... and you can put a lot of work into muscles, but you can't strengthen bones and tendons," said Sidney Schnoll, a doctor and former University of Pennsylvania professor who has consulted with NFL teams as well as the players' union.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six years ago, a 21-year-old Gettysburg College senior named Kevin Schaeffer, from outside Reading, spent the evening with Amy Butcher, a close friend and fellow senior from Telford, Bucks County. They drank at a bar, and talked about their impending graduation and what would come next. He walked her back to her apartment. Then, he went home and stabbed his ex-girlfriend, 19-year-old Emily Silverstein, 27 times. Now, Butcher, 28, an assistant professor of English at Ohio Wesleyan University, has written a memoir, Visiting Hours (Blue Rider Press)
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already the poorest big city in America, Philadelphia also has the highest rate of deep poverty - people with incomes below half of the poverty line - of any of the nation's 10 most populous cities. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.2 percent, or nearly 185,000 people, including about 60,000 children. That's almost twice the U.S. deep-poverty rate of 6.3 percent. Camden's deep-poverty rate of 20 percent is more than three times the national mark, but its population is a fraction of Philadelphia's.
SPORTS
August 18, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
A dark depression dogged Donnie Moore when, in 1989, the star-crossed reliever, recently released, put a bullet in his brain. Eighty-two years earlier, Chick Stahl, a .307 lifetime hitter in 10 big-league seasons, ingested a fatal dose of poison in his Indiana hotel room. And it was during a 1940 road trip to Boston when Cincinnati Reds catcher Willard Hershberger sliced his jugular with a razor. Locker rooms are, in many ways, fortresses. The sports sanctuaries are designed to insulate athletes from autograph-seekers, other fans and, for all but brief designated periods, the media.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014
STARS struggle with their weight just like, well, just like normal folk. The difference is, celebrities take a real beating in the press for their highly publicized ups and downs. When I think about Kirstie Alley, Christina Aguilera, Janet Jackson, Jessica Simpson, Jennifer Hudson, Valerie Bertinelli, and perhaps the most famous of all, Oprah, I think of the many lessons these courageous women have taught me about the highs and lows of weight loss. I suppose that when stress piles up, celebrities - just like the rest of us - use food for comfort.
SPORTS
February 20, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia - As Steven Holcomb's competitive resumé grows, so does his legend. Bobsledders around the world must be wondering if there's anything capable of slowing down the top U.S. pilot. Legal blindness? No problem, Holcomb found a Beverly Hills doctor with a magic cure. Severe depression? He battled and beat that too. The hurdle on Monday night, though painful, was minor by comparison but just as capable of derailing his Olympic ambitions. And of course, Holcomb overcame it too, teaming with Steve Langton for a historic bronze medal in the two-man bobsled finals at the 2014 Winter Games.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Sophia Tareen, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Election Day is five weeks away, and Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. (D., Ill.) remains out of sight. It's an absence, both from his job in Congress and his campaign, that's starting to test patience in his Chicago hometown. More than three months have passed since Jackson, 47, first elected in 1995, dropped out of public sight. It was later revealed that he was hospitalized for severe depression and gastrointestinal problems. There have been few updates on his condition and no hard answers to questions about his future.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | Choose one .
DEAR ABBY: When I was 13, I would cut myself. I stopped around 15 after an attempted overdose that didn't work. I did it because my parents were stressed due to money problems and ignored me or yelled at me a lot. I was also bullied in school. Suddenly, in the last week, I have begun binge eating. I see no hope for my life or my future. I wake up wanting to go back to sleep or overdose. My wrists have throbbed at the thought of wanting to cut again, and last night I had a dream of jumping off a building.
SPORTS
June 7, 2009 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A hobbled, retired NFL football player is addicted to painkillers. A doctor who has worked closely with the NFL Players Association said the union recognizes that the cycle - first the pain, then the addiction - has become all too familiar among retirees. "It's a violent sport ... and you can put a lot of work into muscles, but you can't strengthen bones and tendons," said Sidney Schnoll, a doctor and former University of Pennsylvania professor who has consulted with NFL teams as well as the players' union.
SPORTS
April 12, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Darryl Strawberry is being treated for severe depression, as well as drug addiction and cancer, in St. Petersburg, Fla., and will not learn until next month whether his latest troubles with the law will result in a prison term. Circuit Judge Florence Foster set a May 4 hearing after being told yesterday that it could take the former slugger about three weeks to adjust to new medication. Strawberry has been receiving the new medicine since ending a four-day binge that began after he left a treatment facility where he was under house arrest.
NEWS
June 19, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There were pressures at college, of course, but none heavier than those Lisa put on herself: to do well, to look good, to meet the expectations of friends and relatives. By the end of freshman year, she had developed an eating disorder. At times, she was depressed. When a resident adviser worried out loud about her, Lisa went for help. Until her graduation last month, she was a regular visitor at the counseling center at her small Pennsylvania college. "There are things I could talk to friends about, things I could talk to my parents about, but for this, I felt I needed someone who was 100 percent there to help me and 100 percent objective," said Lisa, who asked that her full name not be used.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|