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NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By David T. Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
East Caln's Board of Supervisors is scheduled to meet tomorrow to discuss plans for the expansion of the Downingtown Area Regional Authority's sewage treatment system. The authority recently completed an expansion program that allows the facility to treat up to seven million gallons of sewage a day. Phase III, now being considered, would further increase the plant's capacity, to 12 million gallons daily. The supervisors are to discuss which of 17 construction options, developed by Gannett Fleming Environmental Engineers of Harrisburg, are best suited to expand the system.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Brookhaven Borough Council's Republican majority has voted, over the objections of the council's Democrats, to scrap the town's aging sewage treatment plant and send the sewage that it now handles to a treatment facility in Aston. The decision came as the council voted, 4-2, at its meeting Monday to sign a contract with the South West Delaware County Municipal Authority for the treatment of the sewage. Democrat Harry Seth abstained. Affected by the decision will be 722 homes, businesses and apartments in an area west of Edgmont Avenue and north of Brookhaven Road.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | By Ann Marie Escher, Special to The Inquirer
The Birmingham Township supervisors have approved the concept of community sewage systems in planned residential districts as part of a comprehensive sewage facility plan. The township, which has been using the Chester County Master Sewer Plan drawn up for the Chester County Planning Commission, soon will have its own guidelines under the comprehensive plan. The supervisors and two township Planning Commission members met Monday night to discuss changes in the plan. Fred Turner, a sewage consultant from SMC Martin Inc., consulting engineers of Valley Forge, answered questions and gave advice.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | By Keith Croes, Special to The Inquirer
Washington Township sewer authority members have vowed to buy a new generator for the Altair Drive sewage-treatment plant after a power outage last week, which resulted in raw sewage being pumped into nearby Kandle Lake. Until the new generator is purchased, they have put work crews on round- the-clock call because emergency power must be switched on manually. For about a half-hour during a rainstorm and power outage on Thursday, the Altair Drive pump station spilled sewage into the watershed for Kandle Lake, the centerpiece of Jay Kandle's 87-acre family-owned swim club and campground.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
When Edward Swager bought the three-bedroom ranch house on 1 1/4 acres in Willistown Township in 1989, he didn't know about the defective septic-tank system. Now he needs a new system that he says will cost him about $25,000. On Tuesday, Willistown supervisors approved an agreement that says Swager will hire a certified sewage-treatment operator to maintain his sewer facilities after they are installed. The township is not responsible for maintaining sewer systems. According to Peter Stevens of Chromaglass Septic Systems in Malvern, many of the homes like Swager's that were built in the 1950s installed sewer systems based on the size of the house and property - not on whether the soil could absorb the sewage.
NEWS
September 30, 1992 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
"Dead sludge" that piled up during a job action at a Southwest Philadelphia sewage plant romped out of its tanks to cause another violation of the plant's discharge limits Friday. Heavy rains sent water from storm sewers racing through the plant, washing dried-up sludge out of primary treatment tanks where it had accumulated, the Water Department said yesterday. The result: a violation of the legal discharge limit of 60 milligrams of treated sewage solids per liter of water.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Media Borough officials were advised Thursday that Thornbury Township gave only "conceptual" approval, not final approval, on March 9 to a developer's plan to dump treated sewage upstream from the borough's water-intake system on Chester Creek. A report of the approval in a local newspaper indicated that the developer had been given the go-ahead by a vote of the township supervisors to build an in-line system dumping 120,000 gallons of sewage daily into Chester Creek. Borough Councilman C. Barry Sherwin, chairman of the council's water and sewer committee, said the report prompted an immediate inquiry by the borough.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Mary H. Donohue, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Uwchlan supervisors, getting their first look at the sewage treatment planning module for the Waldengate and Walden III developments, had some questions about what they saw. During their regular board meeting Monday, the supervisors questioned project engineer Russell Tatman, of Tatman & Lee in Wilmington, about the two types of treatment systems shown on the project's planning module. Sewage from the developments would be treated by two systems within the Waldengate development along Dorlans Mill and Township Line Roads in the township.
NEWS
February 25, 1987 | By Glenn Koppelman, Special to The Inquirer
Jack and Judy Luby knew something was wrong at their split-level home in the Forest Hills development in Monroe Township as soon as they pulled into the driveway. They had just returned from visiting his parents in Pennsylvania early that Feb. 8 evening when they found their garage door open and their son, John, 19, motioning for them to come inside. When Jack Luby opened the front door of his Silverbirch Road residence and looked inside, his reaction was, "I couldn't believe it. " Every room on the lower level of his home - including the recreation room, laundry room and his son's bedroom - was covered with a foot of raw sewage.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
Mounting concern about the availability of ground water and pollution of the Brandywine is forcing regional sewage-facility planners to take a closer look at sewage-disposal alternatives. In a memo distributed to Phase III members of the Downingtown Area Regional Authority, or DARA, on Thursday night, the authority's engineering consultant, Tom Brown of Gannett Fleming Environmental Engineers, suggested that member municipalities take another look at the potential for spray irrigation.
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NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an agreement between Tredyffrin Township and Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection, the township said it expects to replace a 36-year-old sewage pipeline that ruptured and has spilled millions of gallons of untreated sewage in the last few years into Valley Forge National Historical Park and Valley Creek, a tributary of the Schuylkill. Tredyffrin and its municipal authority violated the state's Clean Streams Law in three sewage-line ruptures in March 2012 and February and March 2014, in which more than 18.3 million gallons of sewage spilled into Valley Creek, according to a Nov. 21 court order from Chester County Court.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months after millions of tons of sewage fouled a prime trout stream in Valley Forge National Historical Park, two environmental groups are pursuing legal action against Tredyffrin Township and its municipal authority, saying they violated federal law. In addition to the March spill, the 30-inch pressurized pipeline ruptured in February and in March 2012, and is likely to rupture again, according to the groups, PennEnvironment and Trout Unlimited,...
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tredyffrin Township officials feared there was a problem with the large, pressurized sewer line along Valley Creek in Valley Forge National Historical Park. Two years ago, part of it ruptured. Early last month, a section burst nearby. Their timetable for addressing the issue of ailing pipes could hardly have been more ironic. On March 17, the supervisors approved a $40,000 study of the line to identify weaknesses. The next morning at 10:45, the pipe broke again, close to the intersection of Routes 252 and 23 in the park.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
For several hours Tuesday morning, raw sewage gushed from the ruptured pipe into Valley Creek at a rate of about 5,000 gallons a minute. Then, when officials turned off the flow to the 30-inch sewer main, it caused sewage to back up at the closest pumping station, near Wilson Road in Chesterbrook, fouling even more of a prime trout stream in Valley Forge National Historical Park. Overall, untreated waste flowed into Valley Creek for more than 30 hours, spilling several million gallons of sewage, officials estimated.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A large, aged sewer pipe going through Valley Forge National Historic Park broke Tuesday, spilling raw sewage into Valley Creek, a state-designated "exceptional value" stream and trout-fishing mecca, at the rate of 5,000 gallons a minute. Valley Creek drains into the Schuylkill, and Philadelphia Water Department officials were on alert, in case they had to shut down the Belmont or Queen Lane drinking-water intakes. Joanne Dahme, a spokeswoman for the department, said upstream utilities would see any impact first and would share that information.
NEWS
January 22, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The orange flare along I-95 near Castor Avenue isn't lit anymore. It used to burn off excess methane produced at this Philadelphia sewage treatment plant. But with the completion of a $47.5 million project, the gas now is transformed into heat and electricity, putting the plant front and center in a sewage paradigm shift. These days, the stinky sludge, the stuff of our toilets, has a new future. Experts see not an abomination, but a resource. "We are just at the beginning of what we can do with sewage," said Allison Deines, director of special projects at the Water Environment Research Foundation, a Virginia-based nonprofit for wastewater and storm water issues.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Andy Kricun was fresh out of Princeton on the memorably hot day he realized what life was like for neighbors of the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority. It was 1985, and the Gloucester Township resident was in South Camden for the first time, interviewing for an engineering position at the regional sewage treatment authority. "The odor was horrendous," says Kricun, who got the job, climbed the ladder, and in 2011 became the CCMUA's executive director. "I felt so badly that people in the community had to live with that," he recalls.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
AFTER TAKING a dip in Devil's Pool at Wissahickon Creek one afternoon last week, Trevor Broom chatted about what a nice respite from a hot summer day the pond can be. "Are you gonna jump in with us now?" Broom, 27, asked a Daily News reporter with a grin. "The water's nice. " Well, not exactly. Experts say the water in the Wissahickon, Pennypack and many other city creeks is wastewater - essentially, water that carried sewage before being treated at wastewater plants and sent back into the creeks.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ambitions for what is one of the region's busiest, yet most pastoral, highway corridors are grand, and Chester County officials hope it ultimately becomes irresistible to developers. But to make anything happen along that stretch of Route 1 in far southern Chester County, officials are dealing with the underlying reality that the road to prosperity begins with the basics - such as the treatment of sewage. "Clean water is why we have civilization," says Ed Lennex, executive director of the Oxford Area Sewer Authority, which serves four towns in the Oxford area.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Matthias Schrader, Associated Press
PASSAU, Germany - Swollen rivers gushed into the old section of Passau in southeast Germany on Monday, as water rose in the city to levels not seen in more than five centuries. The city was one of the worst hit by flooding that has spread across a large area of central Europe following heavy rainfall in recent days. At least eight people were reported to have died and nine were missing due to floods in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and the Czech Republic. "The situation is extremely dramatic," Herbert Zillinger, a spokesman for Passau's crisis center, told the Associated Press.
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