CollectionsSewage
IN THE NEWS

Sewage

NEWS
July 16, 1989 | By Mary H. Donohue, Special to The Inquirer
The developer of Waldengate in Upper Uwchlan Township has devised two plans for treating sewage from the project. Both are scaled down from the original proposal, which was designed to serve two other projects in addition to Waldengate. But members of the township Planning Commission said Thursday that they would like to investigate an even-less-ambitious approach - on-lot septic systems. Developer Phil Davies first proposed a combination treatment plant and spray-irrigation system that could handle 90,000 gallons of sewage a day from three projects he has proposed in the township: Waldengate, a 37-house development; Walden III, a 97-house development, and Eagle Falls, 184 townhouses and a 66,400-square-foot commercial complex.
NEWS
October 23, 1995 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The battle between supporters and opponents of development in the township raged on last week, when supervisors amended the Penn sewage plan. About 40 residents filled the township building Wednesday night as supervisors approved resolutions allowing the developers of the Jenner's Pond retirement community to build a controversial sewage system. The plan must now be approved by the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). Supervisors William Finnen and Vincent Santucci voted for the measures.
NEWS
January 10, 1986 | By Michael Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
A Washington Township man whose family home suffered an estimated $30,000 worth of damage during a Christmas Eve sewage backup rebuked the township council last night after it voted against increasing the board of health's power. The council split 3-2 along party lines, with the Republicans holding the majority against giving the board the power to pass regulations and act without mayoral or council consent. When the township government changed form in 1985, the offical board of health lost its power, becoming advisory in nature, while the township council became the de facto board of health.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
The Uwchlan Township Board of Supervisors has unanimously rescinded its Jan. 23 decision allowing the Downingtown Area Regional Authority to determine whether it should allow sewage from the East Whiteland portion of Churchill to flow into its treatment plant. "I believed we were putting money into a study," said Supervisor John Pribanic at a meeting Monday. "Now I find we're approving the whole concept, and that's not what I want to do. " The supervisors said they changed their minds after receiving a letter from township solicitor John D. Snyder saying that voting for the study would bind the board to supporting it. East Whiteland is not a member of DARA, which operates the plant and is planning a major expansion of treatment facilities to cope with increased demand for sewage treatment.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
Developer Willard Rouse may be in financial hot water, but it's his wastewater plan for Churchill that's producing the most heat. To the delight of area environmentalists, the plan relies on an innovative spray irrigation system to treat, reuse and recycle all 1.6 million gallons of sewage the development will generate each day when it's complete. But what has these same environmentalists furious is that the plan also calls for possible discharge of the treated wastewater into the wetlands of West Valley Creek during the winter months.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
It was a Tuesday afternoon in late September, the facts and figures were in, and it was time for a decision. Assembled in the conference room of Rouse & Associates' Churchill project headquarters on Ship Road were Willard G. Rouse 3d, founding partner George F. Congdon, regional partner Peter Balitsaris, Churchill project manager Greg Walters and project engineer Robert Sekola. Both Rouse and Congdon had shepherded the organization since its beginnings in 1972 and helped the firm earn its international reputation as an innovative developer.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
The sewage-treatment and disposal system proposed for a high-density development in East Marlborough got passing grades from the consultant hired by the township to review it, but future homeowners in the proposed development would have to pay more to use the plant than the developer promised. That is according to Russell Tatman of Tatman & Lee Associates, a consulting engineer specializing in design of sewage-treatment plants. He was hired by East Marlborough to review sewage plans for the proposed Patton Farm development.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Westtown officials are close to reaching an agreement with a privately owned sewer company that could solve the township's sewer problems. Peter DeFeo, chief executive officer of the Westtown Sewer Co., said Wednesday that he would propose to the Board of Supervisors that his firm expand its capacity and provide public sewer service to all parts of the township. DeFeo discussed the plan with township officials in an informal meeting Thursday night. The supervisors are expected to discuss and possibly act on his proposal tomorrow night at their public meeting.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
It will take 72,900 square feet of ground to absorb the treated sewage generated by the 167 houses proposed for the Patton Farm project. An additional 74,900 square feet will have to be set aside in case the first set of seepage beds ever fails. Those numbers came from Kevin R. Sech, a soils expert with James C. Kelly & Associates Inc., the Media firm hired by the developer to design the sewage collection, treatment and disposal system for the Patton Farm project. Sech was the main witness to testify Thursday during the seventh hearing before the East Marlborough Township Board of Supervisors on an application by CLX Realty for tentative approval of the 118-acre development on the Patton Farm.
NEWS
October 31, 1988 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
In early 1986, scientists took a sample of the effluent from Camden County's sewage-treatment plant and added a few fathead minnows. The test, called a chronic toxicity bioassay, counts the number of minnows that die after four days of swimming in the treated sewage, an indication of the effluent's overall potency. In the jar of Camden County sewage, the minnows did not have a chance - all of them went belly up. "We flunked the test," said Dennis W. Palmer, the director of maintenance and operations at the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA)
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|