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Sewage

NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
The West Goshen supervisors have eliminated two options for sewage treatment from the five under consideration. The township supervisors met Wednesday night with members of the sewer authority and Max Stoner, an engineer with Glace Associates of Harrisburg, to discuss the township's options for future sewage disposal. Glenn A. Quinn, manager of the sewer plant on South Concord Road, also attended. The supervisors said they would consult with West Whiteland and East Goshen - which use the West Goshen plant for a small portion of their sewage disposal - before reaching a decision.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
Sewage from the East Whiteland portion of the proposed Churchill development may be treated at the Downingtown sewage plant, the Uwchlan Board of Supervisors has agreed. East Whiteland is not a member of the Downingtown Area Regional Authority, which operates the plant and is planning a major expansion of treatment facilities to cope with increased demand for sewage treatment. But because the portion of the proposed development in East Whiteland lies in the Brandywine watershed, served by the authority, East Whiteland has asked to join the expansion effort.
NEWS
July 20, 1987 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
Private sludge haulers planned to try to cross a union picket line this morning at a city sludge-processing plant in Southwest Philadelphia. Trucks attempting to enter the plant to pick up sludge for transport to a landfill were turned away over the weekend by pickets from Local 394, an affiliate of District Council 33 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, said Joan Fredette, the Water Department's general manager...
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
As part of a land-development deal with the Barness Organization, Buckingham Township has agreed to take a lease on 92 acres of county-owned property to be used as a spray-irrigation site for disposal of treated sewage. Buckingham's Board of Supervisors agreed Wednesday to obtain a renewable, 99-year lease on a tract on the north side of Route 413 east of Carversville Road. The board will pay the Bucks County commissioners $1 million for rights to the parcel, which will be used to absorb highly treated sewage effluent from homes in the area.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | By Mary H. Donohue, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Uwchlan supervisors gave a positive, yet unofficial, nod Monday as to their choice of a sewage treatment system for the Waldengate subdivision after studying two alternative plans for several months. Supervisor Bob Koons said the board was inclined to require a subsurface treatment system rather than the spray-irrigation system originally suggested by the developer. Koons said the board's approval of the system would be contingent on several conditions. The supervisors favor the subsurface system because, they say, it is underground and odorless.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Mary H. Donohue, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Uwchlan supervisors received a planning module last week on the proposed Waldengate spray irrigation sewage treatment system, but refrained from making any decisions until they could study the plan further. During a Board of Supervisors meeting Monday, township officials heard a presentation from Russell Tatman regarding the sewage treatment plant proposed for the Waldengate development, located along Moore and Dorlans Mill Roads. "This type of system is not a new concept and has been used in Pennsylvania for the last 20 years," said Tatman, president of the Wilmington-based consulting engineering firm of Tatman & Lee Associates Inc..
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
A decision on state financing of $2 million in renovations for the sewage treatment plant at the Southeastern Pennsylvania Veterans Center is on hold until at least Nov. 12, when the House of Representatives reconvenes. It is an anxious time for residents of East Vincent Township eager to replace their troubled septic systems and oozing cesspools with a public sewer system that would use the treatment facility now owned by the state. "People are calling and saying, 'Please hurry this up. Our kids are getting sick,' " said Ronald Brien, chairman of the East Vincent Municipal Authority.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
On fine days, Bob Haines walks down the hill from his rowhouse back yard and straight into a scene of sylvan serenity, where Woodenbridge Run ripples lazily southward toward Pennypack Creek. But Haines, a member of Friends of Pennypack Park, is not just looking for peaceful communion with nature. He's looking for trouble. And he doesn't have to look far. Just yards from Haines' house on Angus Road, a storm-water sewer pipe pokes out from the creek bank, and a steady gurgle of water empties out, forming a pool 20 feet wide at the edge of the creek.
NEWS
July 18, 1987 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
The three trucks waited there in the dusty road yesterday, a ragged picket line flanking them to one side, a sheriff's deputy planted in the road just feet from the lead truck's hot chrome grille. On the first dump truck's running board, a union official stood, engaged in heated talk with the truck driver. "Back this stuff up man," one union member shouted at the drivers as a sheriff's deputy read aloud a court order barring the workers from interfering with the trucks' access to a city sewage-treatment facility.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County's Big Timber Creek is so thick with sewage that bacteria levels there routinely exceed the concentrations that closed several Ocean City beaches this week, an official of the county sewage authority said yesterday. The latest readings, taken during the last week in June, found that the level of fecal coliform bacteria in the river was three times that in the surf at Ocean City's two quarantined beaches and as much as 30 times the state's allowable limit for safe swimming, according to Dennis Palmer, the director of plant operations for the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA)
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