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Sewage

NEWS
May 28, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Intermittently over a period of five years, the operator of a Montgomery County sewage-treatment plant wasn't testing the outflow and wasn't treating it, according to law enforcement officials. He was simply discharging raw sewage into the Perkiomen Creek, they said. The state Attorney General's Office has filed criminal charges against the operator, Pennsburg resident Michael T. Martin, who was fired months ago from the Green Lane Marlborough Joint Authority. He faces a maximum of 18 years in prison and $40,000 in fines for allegedly allowing untreated or partially treated sewage to flow into the stream and for fabricating sampling data that he submitted to the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
May 28, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Intermittently over a period of five years, the operator of a Montgomery County sewage-treatment plant wasn't testing the outflow and wasn't treating it, according to law enforcement officials. He was simply discharging raw sewage into the Perkiomen Creek, they said. The state Attorney General's Office has filed criminal charges against the operator, Pennsburg resident Michael T. Martin, who was fired months ago from the Green Lane Marlborough Joint Authority. He faces a maximum of 18 years in prison and $40,000 in fines for allegedly allowing untreated or partially treated sewage to flow into the stream and for fabricating sampling data that he submitted to the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
The operator of a Montgomery County water treatment facility has been charged with discharging sewage into the Perkiomen Creek over a period of five years, the State Attorney General's Office announced this morning. The criminal charges allege that Michael Martin of Pennsburg also submitted falsified reports to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). Attorney General Tom Corbett said in a statement that Martin was the operator of the Green Lane Marlborough Joint Authority waste water treatment plant on Gravel Road in Green Lane.
NEWS
November 8, 2009 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Raw sewage seeped into Jackeline and Eduardo Gonzalez's basement, through its bathroom, hallway, and bedroom. The fumes forced the family to eat outside and sent 1-year-old Eduardo Jr. to the emergency room three times with respiratory problems. The toxic flow burned holes in walls and ruined clothes and a sofa. The mold ended Grandma's visits from Puerto Rico. The sewage comes from a collapsed pipe at the end of their block, on Cherry Street in Camden. How does the city respond?
NEWS
November 8, 2009 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raw sewage seeped into Jackeline and Eduardo Gonzalez's basement, through its bathroom, hallway, and bedroom. The fumes forced the family to eat outside and sent 1-year-old Eduardo Jr. to the emergency room three times with respiratory problems. The toxic flow burned holes in walls and ruined clothes and a sofa. The mold ended Grandma's visits from Puerto Rico. The sewage comes from a collapsed pipe at the end of their block, on Cherry Street in Camden. How does the city respond?
NEWS
June 26, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery County's plans for a $25 million, 512-bed jail expansion are on lockdown over a sewer authority's demands for millions in permit fees. Even though authorities say the new wing for the Montgomery County Correctional Facility would not increase the number of inmates, the Lower Providence Township Sewer Authority is billing the county $4.6 million to sign off on construction. The county, which cannot build without the authority's permission, has balked at the demand on the ground that toilets wouldn't be flushed more with the expansion.
NEWS
July 4, 2007 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During big storms that cause sewer backups, desperate Philadelphia homeowners have reached for mop handles, baseball bats, rags - anything - to plug drains and prevent wastewater from flooding their homes. Now the city is offering to pay for what it hopes is a more effective fix. Starting this week, the Philadelphia Water Department is taking orders to install "backwater valves" in flood-prone homes in three areas: South Philadelphia; Northern Liberties and the adjacent community of Old Kensington; and Washington Square West.
NEWS
June 13, 2007 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's worse? Living near a manhole that blows its lid during big storms, spewing raw sewage into the Poquessing Creek? Or living next to an underground sewage holding tank the size of two stacked Olympic swimming pools? It's a choice confronting residents of East Torresdale and a dilemma pitting some members of City Council against the Philadelphia Water Department. The department has known since 2004 that a sewer line running parallel to the Poquessing Creek gets overwhelmed during heavy storms, sending a torrent of sewage directly into the stream.
NEWS
March 14, 2007
Clean water: Priceless I am a long-time Rotarian, and I am proud to belong to an organization that provides humanitarian help around the world. One of the major projects that many clubs are involved in is providing clean-water systems to villages. I read in the March 8 Inquirer about legislation pending in Washington that would endorse federal help for communities faced with deteriorating sewage systems ("House OKs bill to aid sewage treatment). The money would go to modernize wastewater systems and control sewage overflows that cause pollution.
NEWS
January 30, 2007 | By PEDRO A. RAMOS
ANYONE DRIVING across the Platt Bridge has smelled it. Visitors and residents often ask what the foul odor is, and why something can't be done about it. The source of the smell is the city's Biosolids Recycling Center, which processes tons of sewage each year. While the sludge is turned into biosolids used in landfills and fertilizer, the process has polluted our air for decades and violates clean-air standards. Environmental laws are also making disposal in landfills more difficult and more expensive.
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