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Sexual Dysfunction

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NEWS
January 26, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
An inexpensive, reversible and totally effective male contraceptive that blocks the sperm duct without causing sexual dysfunction has been approved by the World Health Organization, it was reported today. United Press International, citing reports in China's People's Daily, said Zhao Shengcai, director of the Shanxi People's Hospital in northwestern China, began research in 1972 on the "convenient, safe and economical" procedure, which entails injecting liquid polyurethane into the sperm duct to form an elastic sperm barrier.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | by John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
Ever since Bob Dole made some extra money after his unsuccessful presidential run by talking about "erectile dysfunction" on TV Viagra ads - right there where the kids could hear him - the subject is out in the open. Now a couple of Penn researchers say Viagra is fine, but they have made a discovery that will lead to better products to help dysfunctional male and female partners get it on. They have identified an enzyme that appears to play a key role in bringing on sexual dysfunction in both sexes - and a second molecule that can just as easily put the offending enzyme out of commission.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The latest research on the pros and cons of circumcision shows it has no health benefits, but it may enhance a man's sex life. Circumcised men experience less sexual dysfunction as they age, and engage in "a more highly elaborated set of sexual practices" than uncircumcised men, according to University of Chicago researchers. Chief among these practices are oral sex and masturbation - ironically, the very behaviors sexually repressed Victorians thought they could discourage with circumcision.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
What happened to men thinking about sex every 10 seconds? Or married couples doing it more often than singles? Please. A pile of dirty laundry or a good playoff game outweighs a romp in the hay any day. Many Americans are simply too bored or too busy to have sex and, as a result, a startling number have no interest in bedroom banter or suffer some dysfunction that prevents them from enjoying the act, experts say. The results...
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
MY MAN, MR. T. From the Bonfire of the Vanities department: The recent riots in Los Angeles have boosted demand for butlers who are firearms and martial-arts experts and double as bodyguards, according to a British school that trains them. The Ivor Spencer School for Butlers said Sunday that it had placed six of its graduates in the United States since the riots erupted, compared with only eight over the last two years. "People there are very scared; they don't think (the riots)
NEWS
April 12, 2006
IDIDN'T KNOW whether to laugh or cry when I read the comment made by a Villanova senior regarding the pro-life memorial. The student did not believe that "the university should impose the values of a certain group of people. " The inanity of this statement makes it laughable. At the same time, it makes me cry to realize that it is possible to receive a college degree from a prestigious university while demonstrating a lack of rational thinking. If Villanova or any other Catholic university is not trying to impose the values of a certain group of people, namely Catholics, then they should drop the "Catholic" from their mission statements and identities.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011
Q: Twenty years ago, my then-wife befriended a young lady almost 10 years my junior. My wife and I divorced, and six years later she died. I re- connected with the friend, we dated, then became serious. I moved in with her and two of her children, ages 8 and 9, and her mother. After she started taking Adderall, which can cause symptoms that mimic menopause, her affection for me seemed to wane, although she told me she loved me. This past weekend, she told me she needed her space. What does that mean?
NEWS
August 19, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Can Viagra save the world's rapidly disappearing population of tigers and rhinos? The raging worldwide Viagra demand has prompted speculation that Asian men might turn to the drug and begin forsaking an ancient folk remedy - imbibing ground tiger penis concoctions or using rhinoceros horn lotions to cure sexual dysfunction or increase prowess. The alarming declines in tiger and rhino populations have been linked by some to the continuing popularity of centuries-old sexual and other medicinal folk remedies.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The subject of the annual Planned Parenthood of Bucks County Community Conference begged a question. "Principles of Pleasure: Fun and [Sexual] Fulfillment in Your 30s and Beyond. " Thirties? Um, aren't men and women still sizzling, sexually adventurous and fulfilled beings when they have been around a mere three decades? So who needs a conference? The answer, say experts: You'd be surprised. And so, the Planned Parenthood Association of Bucks County invited three clinicians to a conference last week focusing on sexual problems in "midlife," which for this conference begins at 30. Conferences in recent years have dealt with women's health issues at midlife and drawn a more mature crowd, said Linda Haan, chief operating officer of the agency.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The rave culture's been going strong for more than 15 years in Britain and the United States, pumping up enthusiasm for all-night dance parties, buzzy electronic music and the love-and-happiness drug Ecstacy. Now, all of a sudden, not one but two films chronicling the lifestyle are upon us - the British-made "Human Traffic," which opens today, and the soon-coming, set-in-L.A. "Groove. " Clearly, there's been some fear of glamorizing the rave scene and the attendant drug taking, which is why these films aren't glossy, major- studio affairs in the vein of "Saturday Night Fever" or "American Graffiti.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drug companies have been hotly pursuing a fix for female sexual dysfunction ever since Viagra was approved 16 years ago. They keep falling short. The letdowns have been seen as evidence that the fairer sex's sexual problems are tougher to define, diagnose, and safely treat than men's. But now there's a new theory about why women and drug developers can't get any satisfaction: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is sexist. "There are 26 drugs for [sexually dysfunctional]
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
The unkempt man was wearing fatigues, standing in the street and holding a sign that read, "Vietnam vet. Please help. God bless. " The year was 2005 and Barbara Van Dahlen, a licensed clinical psychologist, was driving with her then-9-year-old daughter, who asked why the man was begging in the world's richest country. It was a moment that helped propel Van Dahlen into her official mission, the founding that year of Give an Hour, a national nonprofit providing free mental health services to military personnel and their families affected by the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and other post-9/11 conflicts.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IN ROBERT PATTERSON'S Ozzie-and-Harriet world, we women would all be stay-at-home mamas, whelping litters of babies and having lots of condom-free sex with our husbands. Which would lead to more exhausting whelping. But at least we'd be cheery. Not because changing diapers is such a party, but because, Patterson is thrilled to tell us, semen contains mood-lifting chemicals that are Mother Nature's answer to Zoloft. And here we thought hair mousse was the only secondary use of male ejaculate!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011
Q: Twenty years ago, my then-wife befriended a young lady almost 10 years my junior. My wife and I divorced, and six years later she died. I re- connected with the friend, we dated, then became serious. I moved in with her and two of her children, ages 8 and 9, and her mother. After she started taking Adderall, which can cause symptoms that mimic menopause, her affection for me seemed to wane, although she told me she loved me. This past weekend, she told me she needed her space. What does that mean?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010
Q: After reading your column about the older woman's loss of sex drive, I'd like to add an additional idea, one that I use to create deep long-lasting pleasure for the lady: Have you ever tried hypnosis? If the loss of sex drive is for emotional rather than physical reasons, then hypnosis might help a person become less anxious or whatever. But five or 10 orgasms in an evening? I'm not buying that. Now, look into my eyes . . . Steve: Hypnosis has been used by some clinicians in treating sexual dysfunction, but I wouldn't try it at home.
NEWS
April 26, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pharmaceutical industry's push to find a female version of Viagra has been full of letdowns. Despite a decade of testing pills, patches, gels, nasal sprays, and vaginal rings, there is still no approved drug for "female sexual dysfunction. " More than a dozen drugs that reached late-stage testing have been abandoned, shelved, or recycled for unrelated problems. Market analysts still see multibillion-dollar opportunity in female sexual complaints. And two drugs - LibiGel and Flibanserin - doggedly aspire to become the first to win the FDA's imprimatur.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
IDIDN'T KNOW whether to laugh or cry when I read the comment made by a Villanova senior regarding the pro-life memorial. The student did not believe that "the university should impose the values of a certain group of people. " The inanity of this statement makes it laughable. At the same time, it makes me cry to realize that it is possible to receive a college degree from a prestigious university while demonstrating a lack of rational thinking. If Villanova or any other Catholic university is not trying to impose the values of a certain group of people, namely Catholics, then they should drop the "Catholic" from their mission statements and identities.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | by John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
Ever since Bob Dole made some extra money after his unsuccessful presidential run by talking about "erectile dysfunction" on TV Viagra ads - right there where the kids could hear him - the subject is out in the open. Now a couple of Penn researchers say Viagra is fine, but they have made a discovery that will lead to better products to help dysfunctional male and female partners get it on. They have identified an enzyme that appears to play a key role in bringing on sexual dysfunction in both sexes - and a second molecule that can just as easily put the offending enzyme out of commission.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The subject of the annual Planned Parenthood of Bucks County Community Conference begged a question. "Principles of Pleasure: Fun and [Sexual] Fulfillment in Your 30s and Beyond. " Thirties? Um, aren't men and women still sizzling, sexually adventurous and fulfilled beings when they have been around a mere three decades? So who needs a conference? The answer, say experts: You'd be surprised. And so, the Planned Parenthood Association of Bucks County invited three clinicians to a conference last week focusing on sexual problems in "midlife," which for this conference begins at 30. Conferences in recent years have dealt with women's health issues at midlife and drawn a more mature crowd, said Linda Haan, chief operating officer of the agency.
NEWS
May 12, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The rave culture's been going strong for more than 15 years in Britain and the United States, pumping up enthusiasm for all-night dance parties, buzzy electronic music and the love-and-happiness drug Ecstacy. Now, all of a sudden, not one but two films chronicling the lifestyle are upon us - the British-made "Human Traffic," which opens today, and the soon-coming, set-in-L.A. "Groove. " Clearly, there's been some fear of glamorizing the rave scene and the attendant drug taking, which is why these films aren't glossy, major- studio affairs in the vein of "Saturday Night Fever" or "American Graffiti.
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