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Sexual Health

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NEWS
March 4, 2001 | By Jennifer Chuang
I applaud the Womyn's Concerns student group at Pennsylvania State University for sponsoring the Sex Faire on Feb. 3. I'm aware that State Rep. John Lawless of Montgomery County believes the event was tasteless and unacceptable by community standards. But the truth that may be difficult for us to face is that college campuses are havens for heavy drinking and sex, often in combination. What that combination means is that unwanted pregnancies, rape and sexually transmitted infections - sometimes including HIV - are unspoken facts of life on many college campuses.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | By Karla Haworth, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Center for Sexual Health is looking for about 30 men and their partners to participate in a year-long study of a drug used to treat impotence or low sex drive. Daniel Goldberg, a psychologist and clinical director of the center, and his colleague, urologist Richard Milsten, will test Yocon, a mild drug made from the bark of the African yohimbe tree, which increases blood circulation needed to achieve an erection, Goldberg said. The drug has been prescribed for male erectile disorder for years, but has not been shown very effective in tests at the recommended dosage of about 5 milligrams per day, said Irvin Hirsch, an associate professor of urology at Thomas Jefferson University Medical College in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 22, 1996 | By Michael Vitez, with reports from Inquirer wire services
WHEN THIS APE TALKS, PEOPLE LISTEN Bummed out about the stock market plunge? Ready to find a new broker? Try a chimp. That's right, the dude in the monkey suit. A chimpanzee from the Krakow zoo earned a 10 percent return on a three-month investment choosing stocks on the Warsaw bourse, beating a respectable local brokerage, the daily Gazeta Wyborcza reported earlier this month. At the start of the second quarter in April the chimp, Karolina, chose five tangerines from more than 70 bearing the names of firms on the exchange's main market.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
WEED FIGHTS CANCER Taxol, a substance derived from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, is effective in treating ovarian and breast cancer. Trouble is, there aren't enough Pacific yews to go around. But Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. says it has found a plentiful supply of the substance in the twigs and needles of Asian and European yews, long considered expendable weeds. And now, company officials say they have contracted with an Italian firm, Indena of Milan, Italy, to extract the anti-cancer agent.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | By JosĀ A. Bufill
The "Call to Action" recently issued by U.S. Surgeon-General David Satcher seeks to identify sound strategies for promoting responsible sexual behavior in the United States. Meant to serve as a starting point for a national dialogue on this important issue, the document offers in broad brush strokes a clear portrait of sexual health - or perhaps more accurately, sexual pathology - in America today. Three broad themes run through this document. The first points to what may be called a "crisis of self-possession.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | By Brian Baron, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
A new plan to teach students from kindergarten through grade 12 about sex, including the topics masturbation, abortion, contraception and AIDS, was proposed yesterday by a group of health, education and sex experts. Children do not learn enough about sex in school, the experts said, noting rising rates of sexual disease and pregnancy among teenagers. "America in the '90s can be characterized as sexually diseased," said Debra Haffner, director of the Sex Information and Education Council of the United States and a member of the National Guidelines Task Force, which drafted the report.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA is literally in "poor health. " In a study released Tuesday, the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ranked Philly as the least-healthy county in Pennsylvania for the third consecutive year. But it's not entirely city residents' fault. "Much of what this is about is poverty and socioeconomic factors that go beyond individual action," said Donald Schwarz, the city's health commissioner and deputy mayor for health and opportunity.
NEWS
May 22, 2006 | By Aspen Baker
The Guttmacher Institute, the nation's premier research agency on reproductive and sexual health, just released its report, "Abortion in Women's Lives," a detailed account of the circumstances and decisions leading to abortion. What the report lacks, however, is something commonly overlooked in the debate about abortion: an understanding of the emotional needs and coping strategies of women after they undergo an abortion. Since 2002, my organization, Exhale, has operated a talk line for women and men to call after an abortion.
NEWS
April 24, 2007 | By Amy Bleakley
The federal government currently spends $0 per year on sex-education programs that include accurate information on abstinence and contraception. Instead, it spends $176 million to promote a misleading message of abstinence only. If President Bush gets his way, that expenditure will increase to $204 million next year. This is fiscally, politically and scientifically irresponsible. Recent evidence from a new study ordered by Congress shows that students who participated in abstinence-education programs were just as likely to have sex as those who did not participate.
NEWS
February 7, 2002
Dr. David Satcher, the nation's 16th surgeon general and a Clinton appointee, will soon depart for a job in academia. Dr. Kenneth Cooper, the father of aerobics, is heavily rumored to take his place. Dr. Cooper's credentials as a cheerleader for wellness can't be disputed. His 1968 book Aerobics not only introduced this healthful form of exercise to the planet, but instilled the notion that everyone should have a daily fitness and diet regimen. While the concept has produced nothing but guilt for many, it also has improved the lives of millions.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elaine Catherine Pierson Mastroianni, 89, of Bryn Mawr, a physician and the author of Sex Is Never an Emergency , a sexual-health guide for young adults, died Saturday, Oct. 3, of lung cancer at home. Dr. Pierson's slim paperback appeared on campuses a decade before Dr. Ruth Westheimer suggested a frank approach to human sexuality, and three years before Our Bodies, Ourselves , a landmark book on sex, was released. "My primary objective of this little book is to prevent unwanted pregnancies and, secondarily, to help students be more comfortable with their level of sexuality, whatever that level is," she wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new study finds that the erectile-dysfunction drug Cialis can help other little-discussed male sexual problems, too. While it is fun to imagine how this news will affect those couples in the bathtubs, the study is a serious window into the complex arena of male sexual shortcomings. The quality of erections, says lead researcher Darius Paduch, is not the only sexual-performance measure that affects quality of life. His study found that men with erectile or prostate difficulties who took Cialis also had improvements in their problems with ejaculating and achieving orgasm, even when their erectile dysfunction was minor.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA is literally in "poor health. " In a study released Tuesday, the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ranked Philly as the least-healthy county in Pennsylvania for the third consecutive year. But it's not entirely city residents' fault. "Much of what this is about is poverty and socioeconomic factors that go beyond individual action," said Donald Schwarz, the city's health commissioner and deputy mayor for health and opportunity.
NEWS
January 6, 2012 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
A physician who specializes in adolescents used to joke about teens' honesty when asked about sex. "How do you tell if a teen is lying?" he would ask. "Their lips are moving. " A novel national study published last year in the journal Pediatrics demonstrated the disconnect between the sexual behaviors teens report and their test results showing STDs. Among more than 14,000 young adults, 10 percent had STDs even though they insisted they hadn't had sex in the previous 12 months.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2011
N ANCY M. isn't much different from the rest of us. Now that she's no longer teaching and has more time for herself, Nancy exercises regularly, tries to avoid stress and has become a vegetarian. The Mount Airy resident enjoys spending time with her daughter, a dentist, has taken up African drumming and still holds out hope that she'll find love. Oh, and she's HIV-positive. I know what you're thinking, but no, she's not an IV-drug user - nor has she ever knowingly been with a man who did IV drugs or was on the down low. As far as she knows, her partners have been heterosexuals with none of the usual factors that would put them at risk for HIV/AIDS other than having had unprotected sex. In other words, she is pretty ordinary - except that late one night Nancy drew the short straw.
NEWS
January 22, 2009
AT LAST, our country can know for sure that the color barrier has been forever broken. At last, our black men can move forward without excuses, no longer feeling oppressed by the things that had them bound for years, and what they set out to do can be done. At last, the dreams every black person had in his heart for the day of a black president has finally come. No matter how many of our people have struggled before us, and how many of them have struggled up to this day and hour, it has finally happened.
NEWS
April 24, 2007 | By Amy Bleakley
The federal government currently spends $0 per year on sex-education programs that include accurate information on abstinence and contraception. Instead, it spends $176 million to promote a misleading message of abstinence only. If President Bush gets his way, that expenditure will increase to $204 million next year. This is fiscally, politically and scientifically irresponsible. Recent evidence from a new study ordered by Congress shows that students who participated in abstinence-education programs were just as likely to have sex as those who did not participate.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2006 | HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IN A SHAMELESS move to curry favor with Hispanic voters, New York mayor Michael Bloomberg made a surprise endorsement yesterday and backed Shakira in the race for Video of the Year at MTV's Video Music Awards. He passed over the other nominees, Madonna, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Panic! At the Disco and even Christina Aguilera, who's from Staten Island. In a spot that aired on MTV's "TRL," Bloomberg defended his choice by noting the truth in the title of Shakira's smash single "Hips Don't Lie. " "I think I'm going to have to go with Shakira - those hips don't lie," Bloomberg said.
NEWS
May 22, 2006 | By Aspen Baker
The Guttmacher Institute, the nation's premier research agency on reproductive and sexual health, just released its report, "Abortion in Women's Lives," a detailed account of the circumstances and decisions leading to abortion. What the report lacks, however, is something commonly overlooked in the debate about abortion: an understanding of the emotional needs and coping strategies of women after they undergo an abortion. Since 2002, my organization, Exhale, has operated a talk line for women and men to call after an abortion.
NEWS
February 19, 2006 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abstinence may be the message some politicians and parents agree they want teens to hear at schools. But some teens will agree that it often isn't a message that works, and many don't want to hear about sex from their parents. "No one wants to listen to their mom or dad preach about safer sex," said Samantha Martinez, 21, of Philadelphia. Martinez, a coordinator for Reaching Adolescents Via Education, sat with friends and talked about their peer-based approach as the best way to talk about sexual health and the issues that surround HIV and AIDS.
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