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Sexual Identity

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1990 | By Sara M. Lomax, Daily News Staff Writer
Essex Hemphill was about to offer the homeless man some spare change when acidic words rained down: "Hey green pants," the man yelled. "You faggot. " People on the street walked quickly away, then glanced awkwardly at Hemphill - a slim man dressed in pants, sports jacket and docksiders with a knapsack slung over his shoulder. Though he was burning up inside, Hemphill quickly withdrew and continued silently down 21st Street. It is these encounters that have moved Hemphill, 33, to put pen to paper and speak out against the ignorance and hatred that assail homosexuals.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
This review originally ran in April as part of Philadelphia Film Festival coverage. Here's the anatomy of hell: being forced to watch Catherine Breillat's Anatomy of Hell, a two-character study of sexual degradation, humiliation and existential despair. Mercifully short, brutally explicit, and extremely French, Anatomy is about a nameless young woman (Amira Casar) who hires a gloomy gay man (Rocco Siffredi) to "look" at her - in very naked, very intimate detail. He schleps out to the woman's out-of-the-way abode for several nights in succession, goes up to her bedroom, watches her undress, and so on. Over the course of these soirees, the pair engage in penetrating discourse about how men see women and women see men. There are childhood flashbacks (he remembers killing a baby bird, she remembers playing "doctor" with the local boys)
NEWS
September 10, 2007 | By DEBORAH LEAVY
I FEEL sorry for Sen. Larry Craig. Really. Yes, I know he's a lying hypocrite whose anti-gay rhetoric and Senate votes have contributed to a culture of intolerance and hatred that still keeps some gay and bisexual men - men like him - hiding in the closet. It is the same culture that killed Matthew Shepherd. That leads gay teens to commit suicide. That presumes that a gay or bisexual person can't be a good parent. Can't have a loving relationship sanctioned by the state called a marriage.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | by Sherryl Connelly, New York Daily News
"Dawson's Creek," the weekly drama series that's as hormonally driven as its teen-age audience, upped its already-high sexual content Wednesday night when one of its 17-year-old characters admitted he was gay. After struggling with his sexual identity, "Dawson's' " Jack McPhee came out, a week after confidently vowing to girlfriend Joey Potter - played by the current crown princess of teen stars, Katie Holmes - that he wasn't gay. The move...
NEWS
August 17, 2004
IDREAMED about Jim McGreevey last night. It wasn't like the wake-up-with-a-start dream I had about dating Tobey Maguire - it was more that New Jersey's governor wove in and out of my head all night long. I hope it means McGreevey will not fade away forever, but will someday weave his way back into public life. It's a shame that just about the time I get used to having an openly gay governor, he will be gone from office. McGreevey was right when he said during his resignation speech last week that being gay should not affect the way he governs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independent filmmaker Todd Haynes, 50, finally has achieved mainstream success with this year's emotionally affecting HBO mini-series Mildred Pierce and his 2007 Bob Dylan biopic, I'm Not There , which featured six different actors in the lead role. Haynes has a penchant for formal experimentation and for exploring daring, transgressive sexual themes. His 2002 drama Far From Heaven looks like an inoffensive 1950s melodrama about middle America, but is actually the story of a tormented, closeted gay man. Nowhere are Haynes' preoccupations more evident - or raw - than in his 1991 breakout movie, Poison, which Zeitgeist Films will release June 21 in a special edition, Poison: 20th Anniversary Edition ( www.zeitgeistfilms.com/ ; $29.99; not rated)
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
According to its curator, Jeanne Nugent, "Identities" is an exhibition that seeks to "promote a better reading of gay and lesbian experience, aesthetic and otherwise. " What "aesthetic experience" is supposed to mean in this context isn't clear, because the show is basically a political statement rather than an exposition of a distinctive homosexual aesthetic. Nugent, a local artist and writer, organized "Identities" for Gay and Lesbian Artists (GALA) in cooperation with Richard Torchia, curator of the Levy Gallery at Moore College of Art and Design.
NEWS
May 6, 2000 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
So I'm riding in this car and these guys on the radio start debating the current Supreme Court case testing whether the Boy Scouts can kick out an assistant scoutmaster for being gay. And one of the guys raises a question. I'm opposed to homosexuality, he announces. What if my son asks a gay scoutmaster if it's OK for two men to love each other? What if the scoutmaster tells my son something contrary to what I've taught? People are seconding the man as if this were a really deep point he just made - ooh, got to think about that one - and I'm sitting there being thankful to God that I have this space in the newspaper in which to vent and holler.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
What would happen if one of the New York Yankees' stable of superstars - say, Alex Rodriguez - called a news conference tomorrow to announce that he was homosexual? The tabloid headlines would surely shriek "Gay-Rod!" and the media, with their insatiable 24/7 appetite for salacious scandal, would be frenzied in pursuit of every possible angle of the story. Richard Greenberg begins his Tony-winning Take Me Out with that kind of detonation, and he could have easily settled on a satirical scenario about the tumult that would follow.
NEWS
April 13, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Here's the anatomy of hell: being forced to watch Catherine Breillat's Anatomy of Hell, a two-character study of sexual degradation, humiliation and existential despair. Mercifully short, brutally explicit, and extremely French, Anatomy is about a nameless young woman (Amira Casar) who hires a gloomy gay man (Rocco Siffredi) to "look" at her - in very naked, very intimate detail. He schleps out to the woman's out-of-the-way abode for several nights in succession, goes up to her bedroom, watches her undress, and so on. Over the course of these soirees, the pair engage in penetrating discourse about how men see women and women see men. There are childhood flashbacks (he remembers killing a baby bird, she remembers playing "doctor" with the local boys)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | Choose one .
Matt Bomer , 34, who plays a crafty con man on White Collar , came out in Feburary when he thanked lover Simon Halls at an awards gala. But he tells E!News he never hid anything. "I chose not to relegate my history to the back page of a magazine," he says, "which … is sort of akin to putting your biography on a bathroom wall. " (So he's not a big magazine guy?) Bomer says we need to stop playing at identity politics. "What we really have to do is stop the adjective before the job title — whether it's ‘black actor,' a ‘gay actor' or anything actor," he says.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
With children back or heading back to school, educators in New Jersey are struggling with the realization that they will need to implement what's known as the Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights, which went into effect Thursday. There are 18 pages of "required components" to the new law, yet school administrators complain that they've been given no resources to meet the mandates. For example, within one day of a bullying incident, principals must begin an investigation, and twice a year superintendents must provide reports to Trenton detailing all episodes.
NEWS
August 31, 2011
RE columnist Ronnie Polaneczky's "Store Dresses Down Bride for Being a Lesbian" : How can anyone make such a staunch claim of identity based upon something as precarious, if not frivolous, as the human sexual appetite? Worse yet, why should anyone support those who have estranged themselves from the rest of humanity? That's right. I said "estranged. " If that weren't the case, then why do gays use the term "straight allies"? Moreover, if gays see us as enemies, why don't they just fight to win our minds by engaging in intelligent dialogue about what makes a person gay?
NEWS
July 20, 2011
By John J. Rooney 'Catholic priests are ordinary men who have had high expectations placed on them by the church, society, and themselves. " This was a conclusion of a psychological study of priests commissioned by the Catholic Church's American bishops and conducted by Loyola University Chicago back in 1967. Using in-depth interviews and a battery of psychological tests, the researchers found that priests ran the gamut from healthy development to serious maladjustment. The most salient characteristic in differentiating them was their degree of psychosexual maturity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independent filmmaker Todd Haynes, 50, finally has achieved mainstream success with this year's emotionally affecting HBO mini-series Mildred Pierce and his 2007 Bob Dylan biopic, I'm Not There , which featured six different actors in the lead role. Haynes has a penchant for formal experimentation and for exploring daring, transgressive sexual themes. His 2002 drama Far From Heaven looks like an inoffensive 1950s melodrama about middle America, but is actually the story of a tormented, closeted gay man. Nowhere are Haynes' preoccupations more evident - or raw - than in his 1991 breakout movie, Poison, which Zeitgeist Films will release June 21 in a special edition, Poison: 20th Anniversary Edition ( www.zeitgeistfilms.com/ ; $29.99; not rated)
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's happened so often that it's now a cultural cliche: the gay politician pretending to be straight. In most parts of the nation, homosexuality or bisexuality is a clear electoral liability. Not in Center City's 182d state House district. There, it's a badge of honor. Veteran Rep. Babette Josephs (D., Phila.) last Thursday accused her primary opponent, Gregg Kravitz, of pretending to be bisexual in order to pander to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender voters, a powerful bloc in the district.
NEWS
October 20, 2008 | By Gloria Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
Shortly after school began in the fall of 2004, an eighth grader named Tye Clark delivered a jolting message to her classmates. "I'm the same person I was last year and the year before, but I am transgender and will now come to school as a boy," Tye told four assemblies at Cedarbrook Middle School in Cheltenham Township. "You may not agree, but I hope you will respect me and my right to get a good education. " Eyes misting with tears, Tye asked to be known as Ty. The transgender teen finished to rounds of applause.
NEWS
September 10, 2007 | By DEBORAH LEAVY
I FEEL sorry for Sen. Larry Craig. Really. Yes, I know he's a lying hypocrite whose anti-gay rhetoric and Senate votes have contributed to a culture of intolerance and hatred that still keeps some gay and bisexual men - men like him - hiding in the closet. It is the same culture that killed Matthew Shepherd. That leads gay teens to commit suicide. That presumes that a gay or bisexual person can't be a good parent. Can't have a loving relationship sanctioned by the state called a marriage.
NEWS
March 7, 2006 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a Friday afternoon during his freshman year of high school, Harlan Shaw whispered a secret to his longtime best friend. The news traveled fast. "By Monday morning, half the school knew I was gay," Shaw, 20, recently told attentive students at a Bucks County high school. "My other friends couldn't believe it. . . . After a while, I just stopped talking about it. " Shaw found comfort at the Attic Youth Center, which caters to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
What would happen if one of the New York Yankees' stable of superstars - say, Alex Rodriguez - called a news conference tomorrow to announce that he was homosexual? The tabloid headlines would surely shriek "Gay-Rod!" and the media, with their insatiable 24/7 appetite for salacious scandal, would be frenzied in pursuit of every possible angle of the story. Richard Greenberg begins his Tony-winning Take Me Out with that kind of detonation, and he could have easily settled on a satirical scenario about the tumult that would follow.
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