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Sexual Orientation

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NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Karen Gullo, Bloomberg News
SAN FRANCISCO - The federal judge who struck down California's ban on same-sex marriage should have disqualified himself as having a conflict of interest because he's gay, proponents of the overturned law argued in court - running into a buzz saw of skepticism from the judge they argued before. Charles Cooper, an attorney representing supporters of California's Proposition 8 prohibition on gay marriage, said at a hearing Monday that U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker, now retired, should have revealed his "substantial interest" in the outcome of a trial that weighed whether the law violated the rights of gay couples.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | BY MICHAEL BAILEY AND RICHARD PILLARD, From the New York Times
Science is rapidly converging on the conclusion that sexual orientation is innate. It has found that homosexuals often act differently from heterosexuals in early childhood, before they have even heard of sex. A recent study by Simon LeVay, a neurobiologist at the Salk Institute, reported a difference in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that develops at a young age, between homosexual and heterosexual men. If true, a biological explanation...
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | by Jill Ellen Steinberg, From the New York Times
There must be something about males that I just don't get. Listening to servicemen spout a litany of fears of sharing showers and close quarters with homosexuals - even listening to my otherwise liberal husband - has me wondering: Just what are they afraid of? For many years I've played senior women's ice hockey, trudging off to practice every Tuesday and Thursday evening and spending many weekends each year on the road with my teammates. Like many women's sports teams, ours is probably about half gay and half straight.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Do you have any short, clever responses for nosy relatives inquiring as to the sexual orientation of an adult child? The holidays are fast approaching and I have no doubt the question will be asked at least once, particularly because said child will not be in attendance. Answer: Why be witty when you can provide all the necessary information, and all necessary attitude, without deviating a millimeter from a straightforward response: "I'm sorry, you'll have to talk to Child about that.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been a rough 12 months for many in the gay community after last year's national elections, in which some politicians used same-sex marriage as a polarizing - and sometimes effective - campaign tactic. So Malcolm Lazin, executive director of the Equality Forum, the Philadelphia-based advocacy group for sexual minorities, often takes his victories where he finds them. And this Labor Day, Lazin says, there are reasons for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender workers to celebrate.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | By ANN ROSEN SPECTOR
Judge Buford Parsons of Virginia seems to be under the mistaken impression that homosexuality is contagious. Or maybe he thinks it's a matter of "monkey see, monkey do. " Certainly, he doesn't seem to have read the bulk of social science literature on the subject. How else can one explain Parsons' ruling this week that Sharon Bottoms' lesbian relationship rendered her an unfit mother to her son, Tyler Doustou. The judge appears to have based his decision largely on the testimony of Sharon's mother, Kay Bottoms, that Tyler would grow up unable to distinguish between men and women if raised by a lesbian couple.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | By Chuck Colbert
Two new studies, each with an entirely different set of findings, have refueled public debate over whether or not gays can go straight. The resulting controversy reminds us that this conversation is not about science but about religion and politics. On one hand, research conducted by Robert L. Spitzer, a Columbia University psychiatrist, suggests that some "highly motivated" gay men and lesbians are able to change their sexual orientation through psychotherapy or religious counseling.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a finding that will undoubtedly have people around the world comparing fingers and searching for rulers, a California researcher has concluded that there is a connection between finger length and sexual orientation. In women. Men are a lot more complicated. We'll get to them later. This new study is the latest in a relatively recent type of research examining finger length - actually the ratio of the lengths of the index and ring fingers - and behavior. Previous studies have looked at fertility, left-handedness, musical ability, and skill at English "footballing.
LIVING
August 16, 1994 | By Jo Bennett, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Auto mechanic John Gill swallowed the insults for two years. "Queer," they called him. And "faggot. " But after a co-worker slammed him against a wall, injuring his back, he says, it was time to leave his workplace of 17 years. Since 1975, Gill, 41, had worked without incident at Gabriel's Goodyear in Roxborough. But the mood changed, and the harassment began, he says, when a new man was hired in 1990. "I don't think I was called by my real name on more than one or two occasions," Gill says.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | By Mark Thompson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article contains information from the Los Angeles Times
As the Senate Armed Services Committee began hearings yesterday on President Clinton's plan to end the ban on gays and lesbians in the military, committee Chairman Sam Nunn offered a compromise on the contentious issue. In a round of television appearances before the opening session, Nunn (D., Ga.) suggested that an interim policy of not asking recruits about their sexual orientation, put in place by Clinton, be made permanent. That policy "is rather a good place to be. . . . It may be a pretty good place to end up," Nunn said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
  City Council unanimously approved a measure on Thursday that would make it a crime to harm someone because of sexual orientation, gender identity, or disabilities. The proposal was triggered by the Sept. 11 assault on a gay couple in Center City. In that case, police arrested three people but could not charge them with a hate crime because neither state law nor the city code makes it a crime to harm someone because of sexual orientation. The measure approved Thursday, expected to be signed into law by Mayor Nutter, calls for up to 90 days in jail and a fine of up to $2,000 for crimes committed against a person because of sexual orientation, gender identity, or disability.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Spurred by the attack on a gay couple last month in Philadelphia, legislation to broaden Pennsylvania's hate crimes law to include sexual orientation took a first step toward becoming law. The House Judiciary Committee, acting with unusual speed, approved the bill Monday by a vote of 19-4, sending it to the House floor with just five days left in the legislative session. The bill's sponsor, Rep. Brendan F. Boyle (D., Phila.), urged GOP leaders to bring up the bill for a vote before the session ends next week.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE ATTACK on a gay couple in Center City last month spurred the House Democratic Policy Committee to change topics before a hearing at the Kimmel Center yesterday afternoon. "This was originally scheduled to be about nondiscrimination in sports," said state Rep. Brian Sims, D - Phila., whose district encompasses the site of the alleged assault, at 16th and Chancellor streets on Sept. 11. "But when the hate crime happened, we switched it over so we could make it about hate crimes in general," he said.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 300 people gathered at LOVE Park on Thursday to call for an expansion of the state's hate-crimes law to include crimes motivated by sexual orientation. The rally, spurred by the Sept. 11 assault of a gay couple near Rittenhouse Square, drew a slew of local and state leaders, who expressed sympathy for the victims and stressed the need to expand current legislation. State Rep. Brian Sims (D., Phila.) organized the rally. Speakers also drew attention to issues in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, including violence against transgender individuals and bullying in schools.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THEY WERE all embarrassed to be at the rally in LOVE Park yesterday - from the state lawmaker to the community activist. This is Philadelphia. This is 2014. This should not have happened. We should not have to be here, they said. But the gay couple was beaten in Center City two weeks ago and the estimated crowd of 300 people was in LOVE Park yesterday to push for legislation that would restore sexual orientation to the state's hate-crime laws. "Our laws are a reflection of our morals and our values," said state Rep. Brian Sims, Pennsylvania's first openly gay legislator who organized the rally.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said Monday that the department has concluded its investigation into a Center City assault that left a gay couple seriously injured - and that the District Attorney's Office is now reviewing the case. "We feel that there is sufficient evidence to have charges placed against some of the individuals there," Ramsey said in an interview. As prosecutors review differing accounts of the Sept. 11 incident, the case has spurred calls for changes to the state's hate-crime statute, which does not cover crimes motivated by sexual orientation.
NEWS
September 23, 2014
OVER THE PAST 15 years in the U.S. Congress, I have been representing the citizens of the city of Philadelphia with pride and honor. I have been fortunate to see how our city has grown to respect and promote diversity. The LGBT community in our city has worked hard and been very lucky to have some great political leaders to ensure their acceptance and a place at the table. This recent gay bashing in downtown Philadelphia, in what I consider to be a hate crime, has no place in our fine City of Brotherly Love.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tom Wolf joined a growing chorus Friday calling for expanded state hate-crime laws after a Center City assault that left a gay couple seriously injured. In a statement, Wolf described the Sept. 11 incident near Rittenhouse Square as "vicious" and "incomprehensible. " "No one, no matter their race, gender, or sexual orientation, should ever have to live in fear of walking down the street," Wolf said of the assault, in which two men said they were attacked by a group of 10 to 12 people hurling antigay slurs.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
As investigators interviewed more witnesses and reviewed additional video footage of a Center City assault that sent a gay couple to the hospital last week, calls began anew for Pennsylvania to expand its hate-crimes law. A law enforcement source said that police were still taking statements from men and women involved in the Sept. 11 incident near Rittenhouse Square. The couple and police have said members of a group of 10 to 12 people hurled antigay slurs, held and punched the couple, and beat one man so severely he had to undergo surgery and have his jaw wired shut.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
CITY COUNCILMAN Jim Kenney has a clear message for federal authorities: Help Philly punish the people who savagely beat a gay couple. Kenney told his colleagues yesterday that he has asked the feds to investigate the alleged attack on Sept. 11 near Rittenhouse Square, because Pennsylvania's hate-crime law does not cover acts motivated by a victim's sexual orientation. He noted that the suspects in the case appear to be from the suburbs: Sources have told the Daily News that several "persons of interest" in the case are alumni of Archbishop Wood High School in Warminster, Bucks County.
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