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Shaft

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NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Thomas Phakane and Michelle Faul, Associated Press
MARIKANA, South Africa - Chanting miners wielding machetes, clubs and spears marched from shaft to shaft of South Africa's beleaguered Lonmin platinum mine Monday, trying to intimidate the few workers who reported for duty in the fourth week of a crippling strike whose impact has already included dozens of miners killed by police. At one point on the six-mile trek, a striker lashed a whip at a man accused of reporting for work. He took off across the scrubland with dozens of men waving machetes and clubs in pursuit.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A boy about three was found dead inside a 20-feet deep shaft in an abandoned North Philadelphia high-rise building last night by police. Although positive identification has not been made, police believe the child is the son of Valerie Phillips, 28, who reported her boy missing Thursday morning, police said. The bruised body of the boy, who police said fit the description of the missing child, Raphael Barnes, 3, was recovered by fire officials at 2308 W. Diamond St. "We don't have a positive identification yet, but based on descriptions of the missing boy, we have reasonable certainty to believe the recovered body is that of Raphael Barnes," said Lt. Joseph Witte of the Homicide Division.
SPORTS
February 18, 2001 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Golfers like nothing better than a big leap forward in technology. Perimeter-weighted irons, metal woods, titanium drivers. We're like lemmings in search of the latest thing. It's too soon to say for sure, but already there is talk in serious golf circles that True Temper, the giant in the shaft industry, might have taken a big leap with its new part-graphite, part-steel shaft it's calling BiMatrx. Never heard of it? It's the shaft that Mark Calcavecchia, in the midst of something of a slump, stuck in his driver just before he won the Phoenix Open on Jan. 28, shooting a second-round 60 and breaking a 46-year-old PGA Tour scoring record in the process.
NEWS
June 7, 2000 | by Al Hunter Jr.Daily News Staff Writer
Isaac Hayes' soundtrack from the 1971 "Shaft" movie is as important a musical work as Marvin Gaye's seminal album, "What's Going On," or Michael Jackson's record-breaking classic, "Thriller. " Keep that in mind as the hype kicks in for the new "Shaft" flick, starring Samuel L. Jackson. Some might scoff at placing a musical score in such high company, but "Shaft" was no ordinary soundtrack. Created while America wrestled with the issues of race, Vietnam and a insidious "do your thing" mentality, the "Shaft" soundtrack took the familiar orchestral sound that accompanied movies and gave it life, gave it soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Too black for the uniform, too blue for the brothers and too cool for school, Samuel L. Jackson positively slams as police detective Shaft, John Singleton's crackling update of the definitive '70s urban drama. Sporting a shaved head, scythe-cut goatee and a coat of black leather so supple that it doesn't hang, it flies, Jackson resembles an ultra-fashionable bald eagle whose keen eyes see what others miss. While it's a kick just to watch Jackson soar, shoulders slicing the sky, Shaft does more than elevate him from the screen's most versatile utility guy into a franchise player.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman plunged through a displaced SEPTA sidewalk grate on Market Street near 2nd this morning and fell 20 feet to the subway level, police said. Police identified the woman as Johanna M. Rice, 62, of Webster Street near 51st. She was in good condition at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where a spokeswoman said she'd suffered only bruises. SEPTA spokesman Jim Whitaker said the 3-by-5-foot, 150-pound grate was one of a series of three set in the sidewalk on the south side of Market Street near 2nd. They cover a shaft providing ventilation for the Market-Frankford El, whose tracks lie under the site.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | by Lewis Beale, New York Daily News
In the short but intense era of blaxploitation movies - roughly 1971 to 1974 - scores of flicks were released. But a few stand out: SWEET SWEETBACK'S BAADASSSSS SONG (1971). Produced, written, directed and scored by star Melvin Van Peebles, this was the first real blaxploitation movie, and a surprise box-office smash. A visceral black-man-on-the-run-from- the-cops flick, it became a template for the genre: superstud hero, racist white establishment, violent action sequences, plenty of dirty language.
NEWS
October 18, 2008 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A veteran Bucks County police chief and a young officer were seriously injured when they fell down an open elevator shaft late Thursday at a rural winery along the Delaware River. Tinicum Township Chief James Sabath, 48, and Officer Mark Compas, 26, suffered numerous broken bones in the 30- to 40-foot plunge at Sand Castle Winery, Tinicum Officer William Mooney said. Sabath and Compas were in stable condition yesterday morning before surgery at St. Luke's Hospital in Bethlehem, Mooney said.
NEWS
July 29, 2007 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two food-concession employees at Citizens Bank Park were injured yesterday after one drove a small cart into a freight-elevator shaft and landed on top of an elevator car more than 30 feet below. The second employee was inside the elevator car; both were taken to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The man driving the cart was in critical condition with head and chest injuries, while the second was in stable condition with injuries to his head and an arm, Police Officer Yolanda Dawkins said.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Joseph A. Slobodzian, and Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITERS
A Philadelphia sheriff's deputy was critically injured Thursday when a structural failure involving a pair of employee elevators shattered the morning with a boom that some feared was a bomb and forced evacuation of the Criminal Justice Center in Center City. According to Mayor Kenney's office, elevator Car 2B, which contained one passenger, rose through the 15th-floor ceiling into the equipment "penthouse," which houses the motors. That dislodged concrete and other debris, which rained down an adjacent shaft onto the roof of Car 1, which was at the basement level with one passenger aboard.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Joseph A. Slobodzian, and Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITERS
A Philadelphia sheriff's deputy was critically injured Thursday when a structural failure involving a pair of employee elevators shattered the morning with a boom that some feared was a bomb and forced evacuation of the Criminal Justice Center in Center City. According to Mayor Kenney's office, elevator Car 2B, which contained one passenger, rose through the 15th-floor ceiling into the equipment "penthouse," which houses the motors. That dislodged concrete and other debris, which rained down an adjacent shaft onto the roof of Car 1, which was at the basement level with one passenger aboard.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
While hybrid and fully electric cars have become a harder sell in today's cheap gas environment, there's no denying the enormous appeal of a battery-powered lawn mower. Operation is stupid proof, takes no liquids, and rarely requires servicing. Just charge up the high-capacity, 40-volt lithium ion battery pack for two hours and slide it into the dedicated mower slot (goes in only one way). Simultaneously press and pull the start button and power-up bar. Now you're good to mow a quarter-acre before needing a battery swap-out.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
You don't need to visit France to enjoy a good château. Just wander over to Chestnut Street, where the nine-story Crozer Building lords over the 1400 block. Unlike the aristocratic French homes, this is a vertical château, and it was created for a burgeoning American commercial district. Designed by Frank Miles Day & Bro. in the late 1890s for the American Baptist Publication Society, the Crozer Building is one of the earliest tall buildings in Philadelphia. At the time, architects were making the transition from masonry to lighter steel-frame construction.
NEWS
January 9, 2016
NEW YORK 17 salt miners rescued from shaft Seventeen miners spent a frigid night in a broken-down elevator in America's deepest salt mine, huddling with heat packs and blankets before being rescued early Thursday, an ordeal that highlighted the sometimes-risky work of churning out the road salt that keeps traffic moving on ice and snow. The workers were descending to start their shifts around 10 p.m. Wednesday when the roughly 5-by-6-foot car abruptly stopped about 90 stories below ground in the Cayuga salt mine while heading to a floor nearly deep enough to fit two Empire State Buildings stacked atop one another.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
SOME in the local music scene are crying about an injustice. The Daily News has learned that several Philly euphonious greats have failed to get into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame due to ignorance of rock's roots. George Pettignano , who heads up efforts for the proposed Philadelphia Music Museum & Hall of Fame, has confirmed for our very own Chuck Darrow that several local artists - especially pre- Beatles types, like Chubby Checker and Bobby Rydell - have been snubbed by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph M. "Doc" Braly, 92, formerly of Kennett Square, a veterinarian, pilot, and pioneer among golf club designers, died of cancer Monday, May 25, at the Veterans Home in Hollidaysburg, Pa. Born in Ponca City, Okla., Dr. Braly grew up in Huntsville, Ala. Even as a boy, he was smitten with aviation, and followed that love into the Air Force. He learned to fly and piloted different airplanes as a technical intelligence officer stationed in England and Germany, but his favorite was the P-51 Mustang, he told his family.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A man was in critical condition Wednesday after falling three stories down an elevator shaft of a University City high-rise, fire officials said. Around 2:30 p.m., the man, whose name was not released, fell three floors inside a tower of the University City Science Center, officials said. Rescue workers removed the man from the basement of the building and took him to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where he was being treated for trauma wounds, the official said.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Thomas Phakane and Michelle Faul, Associated Press
MARIKANA, South Africa - Chanting miners wielding machetes, clubs and spears marched from shaft to shaft of South Africa's beleaguered Lonmin platinum mine Monday, trying to intimidate the few workers who reported for duty in the fourth week of a crippling strike whose impact has already included dozens of miners killed by police. At one point on the six-mile trek, a striker lashed a whip at a man accused of reporting for work. He took off across the scrubland with dozens of men waving machetes and clubs in pursuit.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | Judi Dash
There are beach umbrellas and beach shelters. The Sport-Brella is both, and then some. You open it like a regular umbrella, but one with an enormous 8-foot wing span. And instead of standing straight up atop its shaft, the umbrella rests on its back, with the shaft at a supportive tilt from the ground. What you get is a concave half wall and sheltering overhang. For extra stability and wind-resistance on sand and soft ground, tie-down loops are sewn in all along the bottom rim (stakes included)
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Julie Shaw and Daily News STAFF WRITER
Whoa! Someone got quite a scare this morning at the Convention Center Parking garage on North Broad Street, between Race and Cherry Streets, in Center City. A black Infiniti, with a driver inside, partially fell down a ground-level car lift before 10 a.m. Andrew Afandor, an employee with the 1st Choice Response Unit tow-truck company, who was there afterward waiting to tow the car away, said he heard this account from garage employees: A garage worker had gotten into the Infiniti G375, which was in front of a closed elevator door.
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