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Shah

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NEWS
April 8, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In November 1967, Life magazine ran a cover photograph of jewels belonging to the Pahlavis - the king and queen of Iran, more famous perhaps for their jet-set lifestyle and European sensibilities than the way they ruled their country. The photo was taken at an imposing ceremony on Oct. 26, 1967: The shah's coronation, on which Mohammed Reza Pahlavi crowned himself the king of Iran, and placed a crown atop the head of Farah Pahlavi, declaring her the "shahbanou," or "the lady of the king," in front of about 5,000 guests.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | By Anne Fahy, Special to The Inquirer
Shafi Salahi,, 56, a colonel in the Iranian army who fled the country when the government of the shah was overthrown, died last Sunday in his apartment in King of Prussia. Mr. Salahi came to the United States in 1979 and in 1980 began working as a bus driver for the Lower Merion School District. Two years later, he was hired as the night custodian in Lower Merion High School, and he worked there until his death. During the uprising that eventually put the Ayatollah Khomeini into power, Mr. Salahi, a 1958 graduate of the officer candidate school in Tehran, led a special division that enforced martial law in central Tehran.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer|narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
It's doubtful that bikers in the Pagan's Motorcycle Club keep membership lists, by-laws and bank statements alphabetized in file cabinets, but officials in New Jersey say they need whatever records the club has to defend themselves against a lawsuit. The New Jersey State Police are the defendants in civil rights suit filed by two Pagan's Motorcycle Club members and a former Tribe MC member. The suit stems from a July 30, 2009, traffic stop involving six motorcycles in Burlington County that lasted more than an hour.
NEWS
September 25, 2011
How the U.S., Iran, and Saudi Arabia Changed the Balance of Power in the Middle East By Andrew Scott Cooper Simon & Schuster. 530pp. $28. Reviewed by Paul Jablow If you're thinking of buying this book, you may want to rent the movie Groundhog Day to deepen the experience. Just bear in mind that the classic Bill Murray film about a man caught in a feedback loop of repeating experiences is far more amusing and much less scary. You can turn a switch and it's gone.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Perry Shah, doughnuts and ice cream make quite a combination. Shah has been a franchisee of Allied Domecq Retailing USA, which owns Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins, for eight years. He is a member of ADR's Philadelphia Leadership Council and chairman of its regional advertising committee. ADR is a multinational food and spirits conglomerate with more than 5,000 locations. Shah, 34, bought his first franchise in Morrisville in 1991 and sold it in 1994. His initial investment through ADR was $65,000.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | By Jimmy Breslin
When Spain turned down Imelda and Ferdinand Marcos' request to move in, it became obvious that somehow, any day now, they will be allowed to come to New York. Moreover, the Marcoses will be popular in many neighborhoods of the city because wherever they move they can be counted on to keep the poor out of their neighborhood. Their history shows that they don't have patience for poverty. And their presence in New York seems inevitable. They are now living on that air base in Hawaii where Imelda says she doesn't like the food.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
LINDENWOLD Troy Whye insisted Thursday that he never harmed Krystal Skinner and was not the person who stabbed her 30 times just days after she broke up with him in 2008. "I never put my hands on Krystal," said Whye, 42, who is on trial in Superior Court in Camden for first-degree murder. Skinner was 23 and caring for the couple's 2-year-old son. She was found dead March 26 near the front door of her Lindenwold apartment. Her son was kneeling next to her body, stroking her hair. A bloody butcher knife was nearby.
NEWS
December 2, 1986
The Nov. 19 presidential press conference seemed to be a forum for the media to unite and push their story line. The questioners were not listening for the President's answers, but insisting that the answers be what they had already conceived in their minds. The media's unwillingness to delve into the nuances of the present Iran hostage situation reveals a dangerous flaw in the democratic process. That the arms sent to Iran were minimal and defensive will be overlooked and smothered in hyperbole to make them seem more than they were.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Three red ribbons dangle from trees in front of Dolores McAndrew's home. As far as I know, she is the first to put out red ribbons, but I doubt if it will become a national trend. McAndrew, who lives in a Chicago suburb, says the red ribbons are her way of expressing sympathy for Kurds and other Iraqi rebels slaughtered by Saddam Hussein and her disgust at this country's indifference. "It got me mad," she said, "so I took a ribbon from a Christmas wreath and cut it into pieces and put it on the trees.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chittaranjan "Chitu" Shantilal Shah, 66, of Norristown, an engineer and respected member of the Indian community in the Pennsylvania suburbs, died Monday, Dec. 15, of unknown causes after collapsing at his home. Born in Mumbai, India, Mr. Shah earned a bachelor's degree in engineering at the Jai Hind College of the University of Mumbai, then came to the United States seeking to better himself and provide a bright future for his family. "My father was an amazing and kind man who has been in this area for over 40 years," said daughter Megha Shah Fitzpatrick.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
LINDENWOLD Troy Whye insisted Thursday that he never harmed Krystal Skinner and was not the person who stabbed her 30 times just days after she broke up with him in 2008. "I never put my hands on Krystal," said Whye, 42, who is on trial in Superior Court in Camden for first-degree murder. Skinner was 23 and caring for the couple's 2-year-old son. She was found dead March 26 near the front door of her Lindenwold apartment. Her son was kneeling next to her body, stroking her hair. A bloody butcher knife was nearby.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer|narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
It's doubtful that bikers in the Pagan's Motorcycle Club keep membership lists, by-laws and bank statements alphabetized in file cabinets, but officials in New Jersey say they need whatever records the club has to defend themselves against a lawsuit. The New Jersey State Police are the defendants in civil rights suit filed by two Pagan's Motorcycle Club members and a former Tribe MC member. The suit stems from a July 30, 2009, traffic stop involving six motorcycles in Burlington County that lasted more than an hour.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
IMAGINE THE MOVIE - a controversial, outspoken film producer is threatened and blackmailed by a D-list actor. It's a bit too mainstream to be a Harvey Weinstein -produced film, but it's just what happened to the famed producer. According to deadline.com and the New York Post , Harvey received a letter in July with threats to kill him and his family - he's married and has four daughters - if he didn't pay millions. Harvey contacted the FBI and they tracked "actor" Vivek Shah by the overseas bank accounts he'd opened to receive the extortion payments from the movie mogul.
NEWS
September 25, 2011
How the U.S., Iran, and Saudi Arabia Changed the Balance of Power in the Middle East By Andrew Scott Cooper Simon & Schuster. 530pp. $28. Reviewed by Paul Jablow If you're thinking of buying this book, you may want to rent the movie Groundhog Day to deepen the experience. Just bear in mind that the classic Bill Murray film about a man caught in a feedback loop of repeating experiences is far more amusing and much less scary. You can turn a switch and it's gone.
NEWS
April 3, 2007
Hoping for defeat It is quite clear that the Democrats in the House and Senate, by their votes to set a deadline on leaving Iraq, hope for an American defeat in that country. This is the basis of their politics. The relentless pounding by the electronic and print mainstream media against the present administration over the last six years had its desired results in last November's elections. What's the old saying, "A lie repeated often enough will be believed"? Not that the media presented lies, but most of the information the country received was negative.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2006 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than half of the nation's budget-priced hotels have owners of Indian descent, and many of them started like Hasu P. Shah and his wife, Hersha, who bought their first lodging in Harrisburg 22 years ago. But few of the hoteliers have gone from owning a single independent motel, as the Shahs did, to where their sons, Jay and Neil, are today: They command a portfolio of 60 hotels, most of them in highly competitive and high-priced large cities...
NEWS
April 8, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In November 1967, Life magazine ran a cover photograph of jewels belonging to the Pahlavis - the king and queen of Iran, more famous perhaps for their jet-set lifestyle and European sensibilities than the way they ruled their country. The photo was taken at an imposing ceremony on Oct. 26, 1967: The shah's coronation, on which Mohammed Reza Pahlavi crowned himself the king of Iran, and placed a crown atop the head of Farah Pahlavi, declaring her the "shahbanou," or "the lady of the king," in front of about 5,000 guests.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2000 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Millionaire Main Line banker Bipin C. Shah is back in the electronic payments business, four years after he and his investors sold his credit card processing firm, Gensar, for a $160 million profit. Yesterday, Shah said he had joined venture-capital firm GTCR Golder Rauner L.L.C. of Chicago in a $180 million buyout of the automatic-teller units of Affiliated Computer Services Inc. of Dallas. The new company, operating from an office in Fort Washington, will service 16,000 automatic tellers in 49 states, processing more than 200 million transactions a year, and maintaining money machines at retail stores, casinos and banks, according to spokesman Edward N. Eisen.
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