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NEWS
November 27, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Tempest is Shakespeare's final play and the voice of Prospero has traditionally been taken as his farewell to the theater. Peter Greenaway's voluptuous and boundlessly imaginative Prospero's Books finds many new layers of meaning in these last words. If the film were simply the curtain call for John Gielgud, the last of Britain's peerless generation of theatrical knights in a role he has commanded almost symbiotically over the years, Prospero's Books would be a testament of enduring value.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In What Fools These Mortals Be, Demetrius mentions Shakespeare, and Lysander replies increduously, "Do you still believe in Shakespeare?" The remark sparks an acrimonious, physical argument about who wrote Shakespeare's plays. From the title and the names of the characters, it is obvious that the performance piece playing through Sunday at Movement Theater International has something to do with Shakespeare's comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream. It is obvious, as well, that there is much here that Shakespeare never dreamed his work would inspire.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | By Clifford A. Ridley, Inquirer Theater Critic
Stagecraft is the star of La Tempestad, the adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest that runs at the Zellerbach Theater through tomorrow. But even a star requires a bit more support than this interesting but somewhat schizophrenic production provides. The creation of Venezuela's Compania Rajatabla, La Tempestad is performed in Spanish with simultaneous translation, available through headphones. This reviewer used the translation. It would have been better if he spoke Spanish, but then it also would have been better if the production spoke Shakespeare.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Early in The Comedy of Errors, one of the boys from Syracuse, newly arrived in Ephesus, observes that "this town is full of cozenage" and speaks of "nimble jugglers that deceive the eye. " Nobody says "cozenage" any more; it means trickery. But juggling is all the rage. The New Vaudeville couldn't get along without it. "Hah!" as the Flying Karamazov Brothers might exclaim. "This is a play about juggling!" Juggling as a metaphor for farce? Or for show business? Or perhaps - who knows?
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Quick. Grab a lawn chair or blankets. It's the last three nights of Shakespeare in the Park at Cabrini College in Radnor. And it's free. At 8 p.m. today, tomorrow and Saturday, Henry IV, Part One will be performed under the stars. Rich-looking costumes, Hollywood-esque sword fight scenes and, of course, Shakespeare's rich language make this performance worth catching. Cabrini College campus is at 610 King of Prussia Rd. For information, call 971-8510. The Caribbean Connection will perform tomorrow night at the Suburban Square Summer Jazz Festival.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Humor and scholarship combine when Elliot Engel tells "How William Became Shakespeare" on Jan. 19 at 8 p.m. in a public lecture at the Charles F. Patton Middle School in Unionville. A scholar and a performer, Engel will offer a light and enlightening look at the author whom most critics call the greatest writer in English. The program is sponsored by the Hadley Memorial Fund and is free and open to the public. In his lecture, Engel will explain why Shakespeare's language and characters have delighted audiences for more than 400 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Shakespeare purists, beware. If you value your peace of mind, avoid St. Stephen's Theater, where the Lantern Theater Company is presenting a production of The Comedy of Errors that is so unconventional that it actually adds language of the director's devising to the text. But for those just looking for a good time in the theater, St. Stephen's may be just the place you want to go. The standard approach to the Bard's most playful comedy is to treat first and last acts somewhat seriously, which emphasizes the farce that falls between.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
ISSUE | ENGLISH STUDIES Be the Bard I couldn't disagree more with my good friend professor Nora Johnson at Swarthmore about not requiring college English majors to take a course devoted to Shakespeare and his works ("A lack of Will: Bard rarely required on campus," April 24). As chair of La Salle University's English department, and as someone trained as a medievalist but who writes on television and film, I am hardly a hidebound defender of the canon. Begrudgingly, at La Salle, we do not require courses in Chaucer, Milton, and others, but we do in Shakespeare - because there is no match in terms of historical and global importance and influence.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
One recent evening, a dedicated group of local thespians was running through a scene in its labor of love, the works of Shakespeare. Moments before her death, a guilt-racked Lady Macbeth cried, "Fie, my lord, fie!" Just then music pierced the air. It wasn't an orchestra heightening the drama. It was director Danielle Bergmann's cell phone ringtone. "My b," the teenager apologized, hushing her phone. But the high school junior could be forgiven for forgetting to mute her phone.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "MUCH ADO about Nothing," Joss Whedon makes the case that Shakespeare is every bit as accessible as "The Avengers. " To that end, he's chosen Shakespeare's most plain-spoken play, the foundation of the modern romcom (the feuding, made-for-each-other couple) and also a kind of Elizabethan "Jersey Shore" - one house (Whedon's own), a bunch of drunk people, and a lot of tangled, volatile romance (Whedon uses a lot of handheld camerawork). Mainly, "Much Ado" is about the "merry war" between swashbuckling ladies' man Benedick (Alexis Denisof)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2016
ARIES (March 21-April 19). When you look back on the fantastic thing you did, you may not remember how it came to be. At the time, you felt you were being lifted and guided. You will feel that way again today. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You'll devote a great deal of thought to creating order in your life. The organization you seek will be possible only after you eliminate some of the clutter. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Nothing is ever entirely your doing, so don't be afraid to take risks.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
The middle schoolers of Jenkintown have of late, but wherefore they know not, lost all mirth, forgone all custom of exercises, and decided to hove out onto the Bard's oft-trodden stage. The Jenkintown Shakespeare Festival began four years ago when Shannon Hackett, the English and creative-writing teacher at Jenkintown Middle School, decided that her wards shouldn't just read the Elizabethan classics. Although she'd always had her classes perform scenes in front of their fellow students, she decided they'd get a better feel for the subject before a crowd - to give them a rough idea of how the product was originally meant to be sampled.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Robert Garnett is a professor of English literature at Gettysburg College Four centuries in the grave, Shakespeare is still with us. But times change; tastes alter; language evolves. Will he survive the 21st century? Over the years, he has annoyed even his greatest admirers. His friend (and rival) Ben Jonson scoffed at his learning ("small Latin, and less Greek") and wished he had revised more carefully. A great 18th-century critic complained that Shakespeare's swelling rhetoric often tarted up "trivial sentiments and vulgar ideas"; more perplexing was Shakespeare's addiction to "quibbles," or puns: "A quibble is to Shakespeare, what luminous vapours are to the traveller; . . . it is sure to lead him out of his way, and sure to engulf him in the mire.
NEWS
April 19, 2016 | By Hugh Hunter, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre is now running a sparkling, fast-paced revival of Twelfth Night . With stunning brilliance, Shakespeare turns the farce staple of mistaken identity into a huge metaphor for human frailty. Director Carmen Khan immediately grabs your attention. Her stage is like a ship deck with its burnished woods, rear railing, and changeable, luminous sky (thanks to set designer Bethanie Wampol). The sound of waves and swirling seagulls (thanks to composer and sound designer Fabian Obispo)
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
T he "butcher and his fiend-like queen" stalk the boards again in this thrilling and savage production of Macbeth at the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre. Director Carmen Khan has wisely cast for voices: This is a cast with perfect diction and powerful resonance. The actors speak the lines as if it were their native tongue; Kahn knows that the drama is in language, and they deliver it. The plot is a study in ruthless ambition, showing us that "ruthless" means, literally, without pity.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
Sylvan Barnet, 89, a longtime professor of literature at Tufts University who edited the budget-priced Signet Classic editions of Shakespeare's plays and poems used by countless students, died Monday of cancer at his home in Cambridge, Mass. A Brooklyn native and alumnus of New York University and Harvard University, Dr. Barnet published the Signet volumes through the New American Library in the 1960s and '70s. He served as general editor for the series and brought in such literary figures as W.H. Auden to write introductions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if you plucked a group of extras playing gangsters in a low-budget mob movie and dropped them into a production of Shakespeare? That's the conceit behind actor-producer Michael Rispoli's Friends and Romans , an endearing, enjoyable, and surprisingly clever farce about the joys of acting and the power of community theater to unite neighbors. Best known for his role as Jackie Aprile in The Sopranos , Rispoli, who also cowrote and coproduced the picture, stars as a far-less-successful version of himself.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
STARTING TUESDAY, Society Hill's elegant 18th-century Physick House hosts the shocking 1926 melodrama that got its original Broadway cast, including the suave Basil "Sherlock Holmes" Rathbone, arrested and thrown into jail by New York City cops. Rathbone said that the forced closing of "The Captive," a very old-school tragedy of same-sex marriage, was a "hideous betrayal" and a "cold-blooded unscrupulous sabotage. " Dan Hodge, the warm-blooded, scrupulous co-founder of the Philadelphia Artists' Collective, laughingly admitted that "when I first heard 'The Captive' had the reputation of being a dirty play, I ran right out and bought a copy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER ARTS CRITIC
CENTER VALLEY, Pa. - The big Shakespeare pilgrimage of the summer would seem to be to the Druid Theatre Company's marathon performances of Shakespeare's "second tetralogy," a saga of English monarchs and wars from Richard II to Henry V imported from Ireland to the Lincoln Center Festival. Yet there's an equal impetus to travel the opposite direction, from Philadelphia to DeSales University in Center Valley, where the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival offers Henry V through Sunday: How often is the same play such a thoroughly different experience?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
WILMINGTON - Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew has engendered much controversy for its alleged abusiveness, misogyny, and insistence on patriarchally enforced gender roles in marriage. But there's no disputing the success and merriment of the Delaware Shakespeare Festival's current presentation, which sidesteps land mines by treating this production with the same mirth and gaiety the fest has shown in comedies over the last 13 seasons. Director Samantha Bellomo achieves much of this triumph simply by casting Charlie DelMarcelle as the rogue Petruchio, who seeks his fortune in marriage to the cursed, churlish Katharina (Felicia Leicht)
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