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NEWS
November 27, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Tempest is Shakespeare's final play and the voice of Prospero has traditionally been taken as his farewell to the theater. Peter Greenaway's voluptuous and boundlessly imaginative Prospero's Books finds many new layers of meaning in these last words. If the film were simply the curtain call for John Gielgud, the last of Britain's peerless generation of theatrical knights in a role he has commanded almost symbiotically over the years, Prospero's Books would be a testament of enduring value.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In What Fools These Mortals Be, Demetrius mentions Shakespeare, and Lysander replies increduously, "Do you still believe in Shakespeare?" The remark sparks an acrimonious, physical argument about who wrote Shakespeare's plays. From the title and the names of the characters, it is obvious that the performance piece playing through Sunday at Movement Theater International has something to do with Shakespeare's comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream. It is obvious, as well, that there is much here that Shakespeare never dreamed his work would inspire.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | By Clifford A. Ridley, Inquirer Theater Critic
Stagecraft is the star of La Tempestad, the adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest that runs at the Zellerbach Theater through tomorrow. But even a star requires a bit more support than this interesting but somewhat schizophrenic production provides. The creation of Venezuela's Compania Rajatabla, La Tempestad is performed in Spanish with simultaneous translation, available through headphones. This reviewer used the translation. It would have been better if he spoke Spanish, but then it also would have been better if the production spoke Shakespeare.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Early in The Comedy of Errors, one of the boys from Syracuse, newly arrived in Ephesus, observes that "this town is full of cozenage" and speaks of "nimble jugglers that deceive the eye. " Nobody says "cozenage" any more; it means trickery. But juggling is all the rage. The New Vaudeville couldn't get along without it. "Hah!" as the Flying Karamazov Brothers might exclaim. "This is a play about juggling!" Juggling as a metaphor for farce? Or for show business? Or perhaps - who knows?
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Quick. Grab a lawn chair or blankets. It's the last three nights of Shakespeare in the Park at Cabrini College in Radnor. And it's free. At 8 p.m. today, tomorrow and Saturday, Henry IV, Part One will be performed under the stars. Rich-looking costumes, Hollywood-esque sword fight scenes and, of course, Shakespeare's rich language make this performance worth catching. Cabrini College campus is at 610 King of Prussia Rd. For information, call 971-8510. The Caribbean Connection will perform tomorrow night at the Suburban Square Summer Jazz Festival.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Humor and scholarship combine when Elliot Engel tells "How William Became Shakespeare" on Jan. 19 at 8 p.m. in a public lecture at the Charles F. Patton Middle School in Unionville. A scholar and a performer, Engel will offer a light and enlightening look at the author whom most critics call the greatest writer in English. The program is sponsored by the Hadley Memorial Fund and is free and open to the public. In his lecture, Engel will explain why Shakespeare's language and characters have delighted audiences for more than 400 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Shakespeare purists, beware. If you value your peace of mind, avoid St. Stephen's Theater, where the Lantern Theater Company is presenting a production of The Comedy of Errors that is so unconventional that it actually adds language of the director's devising to the text. But for those just looking for a good time in the theater, St. Stephen's may be just the place you want to go. The standard approach to the Bard's most playful comedy is to treat first and last acts somewhat seriously, which emphasizes the farce that falls between.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
ISSUE | ENGLISH STUDIES Be the Bard I couldn't disagree more with my good friend professor Nora Johnson at Swarthmore about not requiring college English majors to take a course devoted to Shakespeare and his works ("A lack of Will: Bard rarely required on campus," April 24). As chair of La Salle University's English department, and as someone trained as a medievalist but who writes on television and film, I am hardly a hidebound defender of the canon. Begrudgingly, at La Salle, we do not require courses in Chaucer, Milton, and others, but we do in Shakespeare - because there is no match in terms of historical and global importance and influence.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
One recent evening, a dedicated group of local thespians was running through a scene in its labor of love, the works of Shakespeare. Moments before her death, a guilt-racked Lady Macbeth cried, "Fie, my lord, fie!" Just then music pierced the air. It wasn't an orchestra heightening the drama. It was director Danielle Bergmann's cell phone ringtone. "My b," the teenager apologized, hushing her phone. But the high school junior could be forgiven for forgetting to mute her phone.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "MUCH ADO about Nothing," Joss Whedon makes the case that Shakespeare is every bit as accessible as "The Avengers. " To that end, he's chosen Shakespeare's most plain-spoken play, the foundation of the modern romcom (the feuding, made-for-each-other couple) and also a kind of Elizabethan "Jersey Shore" - one house (Whedon's own), a bunch of drunk people, and a lot of tangled, volatile romance (Whedon uses a lot of handheld camerawork). Mainly, "Much Ado" is about the "merry war" between swashbuckling ladies' man Benedick (Alexis Denisof)
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NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Hugh Hunter, For The Inquirer
Actors in Elizabethan theater companies always kept multiple roles in their heads, because these troupes performed multiple plays within a short period of time. Actors learned their lines in advance, rehearsed for a few days, and let it fly. The Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival recreates that hurried excitement in their current production of Love's Labour's Lost . Rehearsing for just a few days without the aid of a director, the actors stage an electrifying show that is a cross between Shakespeare and the improvisational comedy of Chicago's Second City.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, STAFF WRITER
From the piers of the Hudson River in New York to the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, REV Theatre Company has been putting a novel spin on Shakespearean plays (and other classic works) for more than a decade. Next week, the company goes to Cape May to perform A Midsummer Night's Dream on the outdoor stage of the Emlen Physick Estate. The creation of co-artistic directors Rosemary Hay and Rudy Caporaso, REV is named for the litany of powerful words that begin with the letters R-E-V.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Vibha Kannan, Staff Writer
Edward O. "Ted" Shakespeare, 92, of Roxborough, a World War II Army medic and a schoolteacher who loved drama and the theater, died Saturday, July 2, of a stroke at his home in the retirement community of Cathedral Village. Raised in Wynnewood, Mr. Shakespeare graduated from Lower Merion High School and briefly attended Cornell University before enlisting in the Army in 1943. A frontline medic during the war, he was wounded in battle while serving with the 95th Infantry Division in Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2016 | By Hugh Hunter, For The Inquirer
In a brilliant and riveting Julius Caesar , the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival presents Shakespeare's depiction of the fear of impending political chaos. In this play - written in 1599, when Queen Elizabeth was nearing her end - we meet Caesar, as well as his rivals, conspirators, and common citizens, a virtual tableau of everyone touched by the struggle for power. Actually, Caesar appears in only three scenes (though he hangs on as a ghost). Keith Hamilton Cobb captures his imperious hauteur.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
How do we explain the meteoric rise of Donald Trump on the political stage? The GOP political hopeful has been able to translate his remarkable pop-culture appeal into electoral power. Forget the polls and the pundits. Perhaps the best way to understand is to watch Shakespeare's tale of another man who entered politics after first becoming an immensely popular cult figure: Julius Caesar. It just so happens that one of the best Shakespeare companies in the country, will premiere a new production of Julius Caesar on Wednesday on the campus of DeSales University in Lehigh County.
NEWS
June 20, 2016
Barry Edelstein is artistic director of the Old Globe in San Diego This year is the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, and institutions worldwide are pulling out the stops in commemoration. My home base, the Old Globe in San Diego, is at the center of a monthlong, citywide Shakespeare-palooza centered on the book Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies, Published According to the True, Original Copies , a.k.a. the First Folio of 1623. Printed seven years after Shakespeare's death, the book is the first place where all 36 of his plays appear together.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre  is vacating its home at the Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion, 21st and Sansom Streets, due to rising costs, and will be suspending productions for at least a year, Carmen Khan, the company's executive and artistic director said Tuesday. In a message to supporters, Khan also said she needs time to recover from surgery performed this past winter. While overall financial support has remained strong, she said, some donors "are retrenching," making it imprudent if not impossible for the company to continue on its current schedule.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | John Timpane, Staff Writer
It will be a song-and-dance summer in our region, from the Lehigh Valley to the Shore, with dramatic gems studding the landscape. Below are some standout song-and-dancefests, summer Shakespeare - including four gentlemen of Verona (see below) - plus summer Neil Simon, summer Noël Coward, and more. Riverdance (June 14-19, Academy of Music) The 20th-anniversary world tour comes through Philadelphia, looking back at the show's history, and adding costumes, lighting, projections, and a brand-new number, "Anna Livia" (embodiment of the River Liffey flowing through Dublin)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2016
ARIES (March 21-April 19). When you look back on the fantastic thing you did, you may not remember how it came to be. At the time, you felt you were being lifted and guided. You will feel that way again today. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You'll devote a great deal of thought to creating order in your life. The organization you seek will be possible only after you eliminate some of the clutter. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Nothing is ever entirely your doing, so don't be afraid to take risks.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
The middle schoolers of Jenkintown have of late, but wherefore they know not, lost all mirth, forgone all custom of exercises, and decided to hove out onto the Bard's oft-trodden stage. The Jenkintown Shakespeare Festival began four years ago when Shannon Hackett, the English and creative-writing teacher at Jenkintown Middle School, decided that her wards shouldn't just read the Elizabethan classics. Although she'd always had her classes perform scenes in front of their fellow students, she decided they'd get a better feel for the subject before a crowd - to give them a rough idea of how the product was originally meant to be sampled.
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