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Shakespeare

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NEWS
November 27, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Tempest is Shakespeare's final play and the voice of Prospero has traditionally been taken as his farewell to the theater. Peter Greenaway's voluptuous and boundlessly imaginative Prospero's Books finds many new layers of meaning in these last words. If the film were simply the curtain call for John Gielgud, the last of Britain's peerless generation of theatrical knights in a role he has commanded almost symbiotically over the years, Prospero's Books would be a testament of enduring value.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In What Fools These Mortals Be, Demetrius mentions Shakespeare, and Lysander replies increduously, "Do you still believe in Shakespeare?" The remark sparks an acrimonious, physical argument about who wrote Shakespeare's plays. From the title and the names of the characters, it is obvious that the performance piece playing through Sunday at Movement Theater International has something to do with Shakespeare's comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream. It is obvious, as well, that there is much here that Shakespeare never dreamed his work would inspire.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | By Clifford A. Ridley, Inquirer Theater Critic
Stagecraft is the star of La Tempestad, the adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest that runs at the Zellerbach Theater through tomorrow. But even a star requires a bit more support than this interesting but somewhat schizophrenic production provides. The creation of Venezuela's Compania Rajatabla, La Tempestad is performed in Spanish with simultaneous translation, available through headphones. This reviewer used the translation. It would have been better if he spoke Spanish, but then it also would have been better if the production spoke Shakespeare.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Early in The Comedy of Errors, one of the boys from Syracuse, newly arrived in Ephesus, observes that "this town is full of cozenage" and speaks of "nimble jugglers that deceive the eye. " Nobody says "cozenage" any more; it means trickery. But juggling is all the rage. The New Vaudeville couldn't get along without it. "Hah!" as the Flying Karamazov Brothers might exclaim. "This is a play about juggling!" Juggling as a metaphor for farce? Or for show business? Or perhaps - who knows?
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Quick. Grab a lawn chair or blankets. It's the last three nights of Shakespeare in the Park at Cabrini College in Radnor. And it's free. At 8 p.m. today, tomorrow and Saturday, Henry IV, Part One will be performed under the stars. Rich-looking costumes, Hollywood-esque sword fight scenes and, of course, Shakespeare's rich language make this performance worth catching. Cabrini College campus is at 610 King of Prussia Rd. For information, call 971-8510. The Caribbean Connection will perform tomorrow night at the Suburban Square Summer Jazz Festival.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Humor and scholarship combine when Elliot Engel tells "How William Became Shakespeare" on Jan. 19 at 8 p.m. in a public lecture at the Charles F. Patton Middle School in Unionville. A scholar and a performer, Engel will offer a light and enlightening look at the author whom most critics call the greatest writer in English. The program is sponsored by the Hadley Memorial Fund and is free and open to the public. In his lecture, Engel will explain why Shakespeare's language and characters have delighted audiences for more than 400 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Shakespeare purists, beware. If you value your peace of mind, avoid St. Stephen's Theater, where the Lantern Theater Company is presenting a production of The Comedy of Errors that is so unconventional that it actually adds language of the director's devising to the text. But for those just looking for a good time in the theater, St. Stephen's may be just the place you want to go. The standard approach to the Bard's most playful comedy is to treat first and last acts somewhat seriously, which emphasizes the farce that falls between.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
ISSUE | ENGLISH STUDIES Be the Bard I couldn't disagree more with my good friend professor Nora Johnson at Swarthmore about not requiring college English majors to take a course devoted to Shakespeare and his works ("A lack of Will: Bard rarely required on campus," April 24). As chair of La Salle University's English department, and as someone trained as a medievalist but who writes on television and film, I am hardly a hidebound defender of the canon. Begrudgingly, at La Salle, we do not require courses in Chaucer, Milton, and others, but we do in Shakespeare - because there is no match in terms of historical and global importance and influence.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
One recent evening, a dedicated group of local thespians was running through a scene in its labor of love, the works of Shakespeare. Moments before her death, a guilt-racked Lady Macbeth cried, "Fie, my lord, fie!" Just then music pierced the air. It wasn't an orchestra heightening the drama. It was director Danielle Bergmann's cell phone ringtone. "My b," the teenager apologized, hushing her phone. But the high school junior could be forgiven for forgetting to mute her phone.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "MUCH ADO about Nothing," Joss Whedon makes the case that Shakespeare is every bit as accessible as "The Avengers. " To that end, he's chosen Shakespeare's most plain-spoken play, the foundation of the modern romcom (the feuding, made-for-each-other couple) and also a kind of Elizabethan "Jersey Shore" - one house (Whedon's own), a bunch of drunk people, and a lot of tangled, volatile romance (Whedon uses a lot of handheld camerawork). Mainly, "Much Ado" is about the "merry war" between swashbuckling ladies' man Benedick (Alexis Denisof)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER ARTS CRITIC
CENTER VALLEY, Pa. - The big Shakespeare pilgrimage of the summer would seem to be to the Druid Theatre Company's marathon performances of Shakespeare's "second tetralogy," a saga of English monarchs and wars from Richard II to Henry V imported from Ireland to the Lincoln Center Festival. Yet there's an equal impetus to travel the opposite direction, from Philadelphia to DeSales University in Center Valley, where the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival offers Henry V through Sunday: How often is the same play such a thoroughly different experience?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
WILMINGTON - Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew has engendered much controversy for its alleged abusiveness, misogyny, and insistence on patriarchally enforced gender roles in marriage. But there's no disputing the success and merriment of the Delaware Shakespeare Festival's current presentation, which sidesteps land mines by treating this production with the same mirth and gaiety the fest has shown in comedies over the last 13 seasons. Director Samantha Bellomo achieves much of this triumph simply by casting Charlie DelMarcelle as the rogue Petruchio, who seeks his fortune in marriage to the cursed, churlish Katharina (Felicia Leicht)
NEWS
July 17, 2015
J OSEPH DOUGHERTY, the 73-year-old former labor leader awaiting sentencing next week on a federal racketeering conviction, just found out the hard way that not even Shakespeare can soften the blow of a judge's gavel. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson yesterday rejected Dougherty's Hail Mary motion for an acquittal or a new trial. Baylson began the ruling thusly: "Who finds the heifer dead and bleeding fresh, And sees fast by a butcher with an axe, But will suspect 'twas he that made the slaughter?"
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether shaking up Shakespeare or nodding to Elizabethan conventions, this summer four of the region's theater companies and festivals illustrate that there's more to the Bard than anything you learned in high school. Shakespeare in Clark Park will enliven its free production of the romantic fable The Winter's Tale (July 29 to Aug. 2) with a children's chorus, original songs, and a seven-foot ursine puppet designed by Aaron Cromie, for the play's famous stage direction ("Exit, pursued by a bear")
NEWS
April 30, 2015
ISSUE | ENGLISH STUDIES Be the Bard I couldn't disagree more with my good friend professor Nora Johnson at Swarthmore about not requiring college English majors to take a course devoted to Shakespeare and his works ("A lack of Will: Bard rarely required on campus," April 24). As chair of La Salle University's English department, and as someone trained as a medievalist but who writes on television and film, I am hardly a hidebound defender of the canon. Begrudgingly, at La Salle, we do not require courses in Chaucer, Milton, and others, but we do in Shakespeare - because there is no match in terms of historical and global importance and influence.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Tis high time the nation's top colleges require their English majors to take a course on William Shakespeare. So says the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, a nonprofit founded in 1995 by Lynne Cheney, wife of former Vice President Dick Cheney. Of 52 colleges and universities reviewed, only four - Harvard; the University of California, Berkeley; the U.S. Naval Academy; and Wellesley - require a Shakespeare course, according to the study, released Thursday on the playwright's 451st birthday.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The concept, one imagines, inspired not a few raised eyebrows: Shakespeare plus tango. Intriguing, no? Or merely perplexing? So was born the Lantern Theater Company's current production of The Taming of the Shrew , which runs through May 3. The romantic comedy, written between 1590 and 1592, is a sometimes heartwarming, sometimes caustic take on the battle of the sexes, set in the Italian city state of Padua, and here updated to the 1930s....
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In 1882, a young Oscar Wilde took a one-day break from his lecture tour of North America to visit the Camden home of Walt Whitman. Thematically, Michael Whistler's Mickle Street, now at the Walnut Theatre's Independence Studio on 3, depicts this event as a gay apologia and examination of the difficulties one faced living as a homosexual in 1880s England and America (which Wilde would find out for himself a few decades later). Dramatically and in content, Mickle Street is so contrived that Whistler might just as well have invented their historic meeting.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
IN 2011, JOE CALTAGIRONE, a bartender/actor from Port Richmond, was watching TV coverage of angry "Arab Spring" crowds toppling leaders in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, when he suddenly flashed back 30 years. Caltagirone remembered being in a thrift store on Kensington Avenue in the 1980s, browsing through the "All Books 10 Cents" shelves, when he came upon an old Kensington High School for Girls library copy of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar. " Caltagirone, 61, remembers thinking, "When a book's down to 10 cents, it's two feet from the trash can. Caesar and Shakespeare for a dime!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2014
NOW THAT "The Lord of the Rings" and "The Hobbit" movies are finally wrapped, the filmmakers involved seem more exhausted than elated. At least their post-"Hobbit" interviews make it seem that way. So I asked the opinion of Martin Freeman, who plays the title character in director Peter Jackson's "Hobbit" trilogy. (Jackson also did the "Rings" trilogy.) "I'm probably not as exhausted as Peter is, who has spent every day and every night on it for many, many years," the actor said.
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