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Shale Gas

NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - A well-known expert on the natural gas boom is again facing criticism over his ties to industry and a lack of transparency in how he presents work to the public, fueling debates over research that has been published by major universities. Timothy Considine was lead author on a shale gas report recently issued by the University at Buffalo and a previous report from Pennsylvania State University. Critics say both reports presented research in misleading ways and failed to fully disclose funding sources.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daniel Yergin, one of the most influential voices in the world of energy, says shale gas is here to stay. "Shale gas has come on really fast," Yergin, an author and energy analyst, said in an interview Monday. "But people don't realize it's 30 percent of our gas production. It's not a question of whether to do it or not. It's happened. " Yergin, who is a member of a presidential shale-gas advisory commission, said it's important to develop resources like Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale "responsibly," adhering to best environmental practices while responding to local community concerns.
NEWS
January 23, 2012
Natural gas futures soared by 7.8 percent Monday after Chesapeake Energy Corp. announced it would dramatically reduce drilling in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale and in other gas-producing areas. The announcement came after natural gas prices have plummeted in the last month because of an oversupply, caused by warm weather and enormous shale-gas production. The share prices of natural gas producers also soared Monday on the prospect of greater profits from higher prices. Despite the increase, natural gas prices are still off 18 percent so far this year.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Foreign business leaders are increasingly looking to Pennsylvania as a potential location for investment because of the availability of abundant Marcellus Shale natural gas, Gov. Corbett told an industry-supported energy summit Friday. Corbett said Pennsylvania's shale-gas boom was a frequent subject of interest on his trade missions this year to South America and last year to Germany. "In each place, business leaders wanted to know more about our shale industry," Corbett told about 170 people attending the daylong summit sponsored by the Keystone Energy Forum.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012
"It is beyond belief that there are still people who would trade this progress for a return to the status quo. " - Gov. Corbett, referring to opponents of drilling for shale gas, in remarks at the Marcellus Shale Coalition convention in Center City. "I think it is disingenuous for the governor to dismiss his opponents as a fringe element of naysayers. " - David Masur of PennEnvironment, protesting outside the shale-gas convention.   "We are really, really sad. I hope they call us back because these are really, really good jobs.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Katarzyna Klimasinska, BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS
Energy companies and the government have not made enough progress in reducing the environmental risks of shale-gas production, a U.S. Energy Department panel has said. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, that extracts natural gas from shale-rock formations by injecting water, sand, and chemicals represents about a third of U.S. natural-gas output, according to the advisory panel led by former CIA Director John Deutch. "If action is not taken to reduce the environmental impact accompanying the very considerable expansion of shale-gas production expected across the country - perhaps as many as 100,000 wells over the next several decades - there is a real risk of serious environmental consequences," the panel said in a statement released Thursday.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Arthur Sterngold
After four years of rapid growth, Marcellus Shale gas drilling has slowed. As The Inquirer reported last month, the number of drilling rigs in Pennsylvania has fallen 29 percent from a year ago. State data show the number of Marcellus wells drilled in July was 57 percent lower than in the same period last year.   Gas production in the Marcellus and other shale basins got ahead of demand, depressing prices to unprofitable levels. "We are all losing our shirts today," Rex Tillerson, the CEO of Exxon Mobil, said recently.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Marcellus Shale natural-gas industry has not exactly enjoyed a warm civic embrace in Philadelphia, where City Council last year famously called for a moratorium on drilling because of environmental worries. But the Marcellus Shale Coalition, the industry trade association, will occupy the Convention Center over the next three days to demonstrate that Pennsylvania's shale-gas boom is having economic benefits beyond the rural areas where drilling is taking place. The coalition's Shale Gas Insight conference, which will attract Gov. Corbett as well as hundreds of protesters, will tout the effect natural gas has had on lowering utility rates, generating jobs, and improving air quality by displacing coal in power generation.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The collapse of natural gas prices has created a buying opportunity for Atlas Energy L.P., the Philadelphia company controlled by Edward E. Cohen's family that cashed out most of its Marcellus Shale assets for billions in 2010. Atlas Resource Partners L.P., the company's exploration and production subsidiary, on Thursday announced it is buying the Barnett Shale assets of Titan Operating L.L.C., a private company in Fort Worth, Texas, for $184 million. The leases contain 250 billion cubic feet of proven reserves and 43 producing wells on about 16,000 acres.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
At some point this year - it may have already happened - production of Marcellus Shale natural gas will exceed Pennsylvania's demand for the fuel. The state will become a net exporter of natural gas. If current trends continue, annual Marcellus output could quintuple by 2020, making Pennsylvania the second-largest producer behind Texas, according to Timothy J. Considine, a University of Wyoming energy economist, who has cowritten several bullish studies on shale gas. Where will the gas go?
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