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Sham

NEWS
October 30, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Revenge is sweet. Just ask Tom Cruise and wife Nicole Kidman. They accepted a "substantial" settlement from London's Express Newspapers, which had accused Cruise of being gay and called his marriage a sham to cover up his alleged homosexuality. The amount of the settlement was undisclosed. But the sum was believed to be $167,000 for each of them plus legal costs of about $250,000. McBurger, McBeal? If Calista Flockhart, TV's Ally McBeal, wants people to stop accusing her of having an eating disorder, then why doesn't she eat more?
NEWS
January 3, 2007
FOR 15 YEARS, I've been an activist and a reporter, and one thing I've learned is that there are an incredible number of ways that rich, powerful people screw over poor people. They cheat us. Steal from us. Sue us. Take our homes. Pollute our air and water. Lie to us. Lay us off. Fire us if we try to unionize. Scare us into thinking we have no power. Control us any way they can. But never, ever in the last 15 years have I seen anything as egregious as what happened with the casinos.
SPORTS
January 31, 2013 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Staff Writer
NOW THAT the NCAA has revealed that it is investigating its investigators, isn't it time to end this fraud once and for all. One of the great political mysteries is how an organization that generates ridiculous amounts of cash for the television rights to the NCAA basketball tournament and oversees a never-ending arms race among its member schools in search of endless revenue streams is able to maintain its tax-exempt status. Seems that everybody gets paid expect the players, aka, the "student-athletes.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | MICHELLE MALKIN
NEWSFLASH: The woman who helped launder Al Gore's Buddhist temple money has not served a single day in jail. And probably never will. The hidden story of how funny-money honey Maria Hsia escaped any meaningful punishment for corrupting our election system shows just how empty all of this week's sound and fury over campaign finance reform really is. In the spring of 2000, Hsia was convicted by a federal jury in Washington of five felony counts...
NEWS
January 12, 2004 | By BRIAN WM. NILES
IMAGINE protecting your car from thieves by placing a decal in the window that warns of an on-board security system. There is no system, just a decal. While it may fool some people, real thieves will laugh as they drive away in your car. That's what the long-awaited CAN-SPAM law is like. Congress has slapped a decal on your computer monitor, warning spammers that there's a price to pay if they continue their onslaught of unwanted mail. But there is no price to pay, just the decal.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
Last Dec. 16, Republican presidential hopeful Sen. John McCain made front pages across the nation by shaking hands with a leading Democratic contender, Bill Bradley, and pledging to fight to reform America's campaign finance system. But on the very next day, the Arizona senator netted at least $15,750 at a fund-raiser largely attended by executives, spouses and business associates of Philadelphia-based Comcast Corp., the cable-TV giant with a major interest in legislation in front of the Senate Commerce Committee - chaired by McCain.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | By Elmer Smith
I've once more to click on the tube and see Dubya or Big Al fondling a child in a classroom or schoolyard. About once more to see America's next Education President mug for the cameras with a pointer in his hand and a chalkboard as a backdrop, before I launch my early warning system for America's public schools. I'd post pictures of the grinning gladhanders with red slashes through their grillwork and a warning: "Candidate-free school zone. " An armed militia would be posted as lookouts for motorcades and minicams with orders to terminate with extreme malice.
NEWS
June 21, 1994
Signing into law the state budget that will be the legacy of his eight years in office, Gov. Casey called the spending plan "fair and equitable. " Hardly. The big winners are businesses that will enjoy tax cuts, and maybe the Legislature, which voted itself a $20 million increase for operating costs. The governor says his budget adds 7,000 people to the welfare rolls, including victims of domestic violence and children up to age 20. Nice. But he doesn't mention that for every person added, 30 others have been cut off - most of them old, feeble and unemployable.
SPORTS
June 24, 1991 | The Inquirer Staff
A fired University of Miami official says he faked hundreds of financial- aid forms to help needy students for more than a decade, but began charging kickbacks only in the last two years to feed a cocaine habit. Former associate academic coordinator Tony Russell said Saturday in Lauderdale Lakes, Fla., that he charged $85 to Miami students, mostly football players, to falsify financial-aid applications so he could support his addiction. Russell, 43, under investigation by the FBI, made the admissions in a lengthy interview at his home with a selected group of reporters.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | BY DONALD KAUL
I've heard some cynical speeches in my time - there was Richard Nixon's "I Am Not A Crook" effort and Lyndon Johnson on the Gulf of Tonkin incident - but I don't believe I've ever heard a president give a more blatherous account of himself than George Bush did Tuesday in his televised address to Congress. It was majestic in its fraudulence, underwhelming in its vacuousness. It was unctuous, pandering and base. Naturally, it was a big hit. The American people love blather. I think it reinforces the superstition that life is a television commercial.
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