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Sham

NEWS
June 20, 1987 | By Howard Goodman and Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writers
An owner of one of the bonds that were floated for Chester's proposed $335 million trash plant filed suit yesterday, saying that the initial bond issue last August was a "sham" and that the tax-exempt status of the bonds is in doubt. Agents of the FBI, meanwhile, have been meeting in Philadelphia and Newark in the last two weeks in a widening investigation of several bond issues, including Chester's, according to reliable sources. The FBI is investigating possible wire fraud in bond issues underwritten by the Wall Street investment banking firm of Matthews & Wright Inc., the sources said.
NEWS
May 10, 2004 | By Norman Ornstein
Two years and seven months after Sept. 11, 2001 - a day in which the U.S. Capitol and the House of Representatives narrowly dodged a disaster that could have left Congress without a working quorum for months at the worst possible time - the House debated how to provide a continuing constitutional system in the event of a catastrophic terrorist attack. Unfortunately, the resulting bill, which was hailed by its sponsors and Republican House leaders as the ultimate and only solution to the issue, has divided the House on partisan lines.
NEWS
August 22, 2002 | By TIMOTHY NOAH
NEW YORK Times Editor Howell Raines struck a blow for gay rights by announcing that, starting next month, the Times will publish "reports of same-sex commitment ceremonies and of some types of formal registration of gay and lesbian partnerships. " But no one should mistake this reform for a meaningful victory on behalf of social justice. If Raines is really interested in advancing equality, he shouldn't reform the Times wedding pages. He should abolish them. These pages are built on the false assumption that the weddings of wealthy non-celebrities constitute news.
NEWS
July 2, 2004 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
After hearing a seven-count charge sheet that alleged he ordered the killing of thousands of Iraqis, the assassination of religious and political figures, and the deployment of chemical weapons on a small mountain town, Saddam Hussein scoffed at an investigative judge yesterday and dismissed the process. "You know that this is all theater by Bush, the criminal, to help him with his campaign," Hussein said. The ex-Iraqi dictator was belligerent and unapologetic in court. Asked at the beginning of the hearing what his name was, for the record, he replied: "I am Saddam Hussein, president of Iraq.
NEWS
May 4, 1986 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Chester was laid to rest in Eden Cemetery in Collingdale on May 23, 1983. But a year after the death of the 55-year-old black man, the City of Philadelphia approved Keystone Steel, the company he owned with a white partner, for a $50,000 contract as a minority-owned firm. The firm's minority status was based on the dead man's name. It may be out of the ordinary for a firm's minority status to be dependent on a dead man. But the fact that the city awarded a contract to a white-owned business when it was supposed to go to a minority was far from unusual.
NEWS
November 13, 2003
IF YOU BELIEVED the promises of advocates for the so-called campaign-finance reform law passed last year, you would expect to see a substantial reduction in the influence of big money in politics by now. But this newspaper never believed those promises. We doubted that politicians would miss many beats before finding ways to get the same money from the same donors that once went to the "soft money" contributions banned by the law. So we're not surprised that the big-money race in politics continues.
NEWS
August 8, 1995
Who could oppose a line item in Pennsylvania's budget giving $100,000 to the Montgomery County Association for Retarded Citizens? Or $150,000 to the Delaware County Drug and Alcohol Commission, or $100,000 to the YWCA in Northeast Philadelphia? The do-good citizens' lobby group Common Cause, that's who. And it has good cause to do so, while Gov. Ridge and legislative leaders just have bad excuses for continuing a poor public policy. The point here is not to eliminate small state grants to worthy nongovernmental organizations.
NEWS
August 10, 1998
"They feel used. " That is how a European diplomat described the feelings of Cambodian voters, whom the international community hypocritically claimed to be helping toward democracy. Last week, results were announced for the second of Cambodia's "democratic" elections, held July 26. The incumbent, Hun Sen, an ex-member of the genocidal Khmer Rouge, won a majority in parliament. Reports indicate that ballot manipulations and voter intimidation were widespread. But a much-too-small contingent of international observers gave the elections its swift stamp of approval and went home.
NEWS
September 9, 2005
IF THE BUSH administration and its allies had spent a tenth of the energy they are wasting on avoiding responsibility for the debacle in New Orleans and surrounding areas, more people would be alive today. Instead, the administration continues to spin all sorts of excuses and allegations, without benefit of the truth. And the GOP is now trying to sell to the American public an investigation into this mess that seems tailor-made to whitewash the fatal errors in judgment from the White House.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1989 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
With little fanfare, the federal government will raise the taxes of 131 million workers, starting tomorrow, to fatten the Social Security trust funds, despite complaints that the buildup of the funds is a sham. The payroll tax increase will cost some workers more than $300 next year, part of the government's plan to save money for the retirement of the baby boom generation. But some economists and lawmakers complain that the Social Security reserves, instead of being saved for retirement benefits in the next century, are being borrowed to pay for current government programs.
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