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NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - The ceremony had the feel of a funeral. As upwards of 3,000 people convened Saturday to mark the dedication of the Flight 93 National Memorial, there was no forgetting that the fragmentary remains of 40 airline passengers lay just a hundred yards away in a wildflower meadow. When United Airlines Flight 93 crashed on Sept. 11, 2001, the impact at close to 600 mph was so great that the plane and its occupants were obliterated. Few body parts were ever found.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Nancy A. Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The head of the Air Force on Wednesday disputed a report that some unidentified remains from the Sept. 11, 2001, plane crash site near Shanksville, Pa., had been disposed of in a landfill, casting more confusion on an episode that has embarrassed the Pentagon and Dover Air Force Base, which handles the remains of the nation's war dead. A report commissioned by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and released Tuesday found that some unidentifiable remains of victims from the terrorist attack on the Pentagon and the United Airlines Flight 93 crash near Shanksville were "placed in sealed containers that were provided to a biomedical waste disposal contractor.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not as though anyone can or will forget that day. Like all pivotal moments in history, Sept. 11, 2001, has been etched deeply, painfully, permanently in the collective memory. When those 19 terrorists hijacked those four planes that felled the World Trade Center towers, pierced the Pentagon's armor, and crashed in a fiery ball near Shanksville, Pa., they changed the world forever, earning themselves the immortality of the evil. We need only close our eyes to see the images of the billowing smoke, the waffled steel, the Edvard Munch faces contorted in horror.
NEWS
December 12, 2009 | By Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abandoned in a Western Pennsylvania field since the mid-1990s, a pair of towering, rusted cranes bore silent witness to a national tragedy on Sept. 11, 2001, as United Flight 93 plunged into the earth just a few hundred yards away. The dragline cranes, relics of the coal strip-mining heyday of Somerset County, were standing by the smoking crater when first responders arrived from nearby Shanksville. They stayed there for years afterward, becoming to regular visitors part of the hallowed landscape.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | By Diane Mastrull and Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
This small town in the Appalachian Mountains is the kind of place, locals say, where the only reason to lock your car is to keep a neighbor from putting too much homegrown zucchini in it. Excitement, one resident said, is getting "the biggest buck kill of the year. " So when word came over the radio at Ida's Country Store on Tuesday morning that three hijacked jetliners had just crashed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon as part of a terrorist plot, Donna Wilt found comfort in Shanksville's remoteness.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A few of the family members were together again Tuesday, gathered inside the Capitol - the building that might have been struck had their relatives not fought for control of United Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001, bringing it down in a Pennsylvania field. "It's good to be together again, as it always is," said Gordon Felt, wearing an American flag tie and 9/11 pin. Felt's brother, Edward, was a computer systems engineer on the Newark-to-San Francisco flight that was hijacked and turned toward Washington - headed toward the Capitol, authorities believe - before the passengers and crew fought back.
NEWS
September 8, 2005 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A tower filled with wind chimes and a curving tree-lined bowl leading to the "sacred ground" of the Shanksville, Pa., crash site was selected yesterday as the design for a national memorial to the victims of Flight 93. It was the only hijacked plane on Sept. 11, 2001, not to have reached its target or claimed lives on the ground. "The Crescent of Embrace," designed by a team led by a Los Angeles architect, was chosen by a 15-member jury from five finalists, themselves picked from more than 1,000 design entries in the yearlong process.
NEWS
September 6, 2011 | Associated Press
JOHNSTOWN, Pa. - A newly released video shows a gray mushroom cloud rising minutes after United Airlines Flight 93 crashed near Shanksville on Sept. 11, 2001. The video was filmed and narrated by Somerset County resident Dave Berkebile, who died this year. In it, Berkebile calmly reports that a plane has crashed a few miles from his Berlin home and assumes a link to the other terror attacks that day. Donna Glessner, who is collecting oral histories for the National Park Service, said she thinks the video is the earliest footage of the crash near Shanksville, southeast of Pittsburgh.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
What better place to display decisiveness than at the hallowed ground in western Pennsylvania where the Sept. 11 heroes of Flight 93 perished? Gov. Rendell acted promptly and properly this week to defuse an unpleasant controversy over paying for security at the crash site. On Tuesday, the governor pledged $120,000 to safeguard the tract of land near Shanksville in Somerset County. That means the thousands of visitors to the temporary memorial overlooking the site will not be asked to drop their spare change into a donation box. Facing mounting security costs of $10,000 a month, the owner of the site, Mike Svonavec, triggered a brouhaha June 2 when he decided to seek the public's help.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The Rev. Alphonse Mascherino, 69, who left the Roman Catholic Church and founded a nondenominational chapel to honor the victims of hijacked United Airlines Flight 93, has died of cancer. He died Friday at a hospice in Somerset, Pa. Mr. Mascherino bought a former Lutheran church and converted it into the Flight 93 Memorial Chapel, in honor of 40 passengers and crew killed when the hijacked airliner crashed near Shanksville during the Sept. 11 attacks. At the time, Altoona-Johnstown Bishop Joseph Adamec said Mr. Mascherino's work was commendable but not compatible with his Catholic priesthood.
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NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Deborah Borza ran her fingers along the raised name of her daughter, Deora Bodley, on the plaque honoring the 40 passengers and crew of United Flight 93, killed when their plane crashed in a Pennsylvania field on 9/11. She does it every time she visits the Capitol. It was one personal tribute here on a day of gestures both grand and small in memory of those killed in the Sept. 11 attacks, 13 years ago Thursday. Wednesday morning began with a ceremony awarding the victims Congress' highest honor, the Congressional Gold Medal, in a stately event led by the nation's four most senior lawmakers.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The Rev. Alphonse Mascherino, 69, who left the Roman Catholic Church and founded a nondenominational chapel to honor the victims of hijacked United Airlines Flight 93, has died of cancer. He died Friday at a hospice in Somerset, Pa. Mr. Mascherino bought a former Lutheran church and converted it into the Flight 93 Memorial Chapel, in honor of 40 passengers and crew killed when the hijacked airliner crashed near Shanksville during the Sept. 11 attacks. At the time, Altoona-Johnstown Bishop Joseph Adamec said Mr. Mascherino's work was commendable but not compatible with his Catholic priesthood.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - A few of the family members were together again Tuesday, gathered inside the Capitol - the building that might have been struck had their relatives not fought for control of United Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001, bringing it down in a Pennsylvania field. "It's good to be together again, as it always is," said Gordon Felt, wearing an American flag tie and 9/11 pin. Felt's brother, Edward, was a computer systems engineer on the Newark-to-San Francisco flight that was hijacked and turned toward Washington - headed toward the Capitol, authorities believe - before the passengers and crew fought back.
NEWS
September 9, 2012
PHILADELPHIA Specter out of hospital Arlen Specter was released Friday morning from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where the longtime U.S. senator had been treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, his family has confirmed. Specter is "expected to return to HUP periodically for additional cancer treatment," said a brief statement released by his family. Specter, 82, announced in 2005 that he had Hodgkin's disease for which he underwent chemotherapy. His cancer returned and he was treated again in 2008.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Nancy A. Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The head of the Air Force on Wednesday disputed a report that some unidentified remains from the Sept. 11, 2001, plane crash site near Shanksville, Pa., had been disposed of in a landfill, casting more confusion on an episode that has embarrassed the Pentagon and Dover Air Force Base, which handles the remains of the nation's war dead. A report commissioned by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and released Tuesday found that some unidentifiable remains of victims from the terrorist attack on the Pentagon and the United Airlines Flight 93 crash near Shanksville were "placed in sealed containers that were provided to a biomedical waste disposal contractor.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
Each of my trips to Shanksville, Pa., has been inspiring, for different reasons. My first trip was six years ago, when the Internet was ablaze with criticism of the planned memorial to the passengers and crew of Flight 93. The project was then in the design phase, and some saw the presence of an Islamic crescent in the proposed alignment of indigenous maple trees. I decided to go take a look, accompanied by a busload of 47 radio listeners. Aboard was Ed Root, a retired business analyst, who lost his cousin, Bucks County resident Lorraine Bay, on the flight.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Melodie Homer will be in Shanksville, Pa., on Sunday to help commemorate the 10th anniversary of 9/11 - and to remember, once again, the hero she lost. LeRoy W. Homer Jr. was the copilot on United Airlines Flight 93 out of Newark when four terrorists commandeered it, possibly planning to plunge it into the U.S. Capitol. The handsome aviator from Marlton and everyone else aboard died when the Boeing 757 crashed instead into the Pennsylvania countryside. Leroy Homer was 36 years old. "All things considered, I'm OK," Melodie said by phone when asked about her state of mind in the days before this year's observation.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - The ceremony had the feel of a funeral. As upward of 3,000 people convened Saturday to mark the dedication of the Flight 93 National Memorial, there was no forgetting that the fragmentary remains of 40 airline passengers lay just a hundred yards away in a wildflower meadow. When United Airlines Flight 93 crashed on Sept. 11, 2001, the impact at close to 600 m.p.h. was so great the plane and its occupants were obliterated. Few body parts were found. And so the meadow is a cordoned-off cemetery.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - The ceremony had the feel of a funeral. As upwards of 3,000 people convened Saturday to mark the dedication of the Flight 93 National Memorial, there was no forgetting that the fragmentary remains of 40 airline passengers lay just a hundred yards away in a wildflower meadow. When United Airlines Flight 93 crashed on Sept. 11, 2001, the impact at close to 600 mph was so great that the plane and its occupants were obliterated. Few body parts were ever found.
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