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Shareholder Meeting

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BUSINESS
April 28, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Activist Kati Sipp and Comcast customers won't have a public forum this year to grill Comcast CEO Brian Roberts. Comcast Corp. has scrapped its traditional annual shareholder meeting, the site of protests over the Time Warner Cable deal and other issues, for an Internet-based, "virtual" shareholder meeting. The company, which earned $8.2 billion in profits and paid its top six executives $176 million in 2015, said the online shareholder meeting will save Comcast on meeting costs at the Kimmel Center.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like politicians ending a bitter campaign, the activists and company officials who have bloodied each other in a proxy fight for influence over Charming Shoppes Inc. will meet today for the corporate equivalent of election night - the shareholder meeting. Hanging in the balance as final votes are cast at the 10 a.m. meeting at the Bensalem headquarters of the company, whose operations include the Lane Bryant and Fashion Bug chains, will be the fate of chief executive officer and board chairwoman Dorrit J. Bern.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1996 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norfolk Southern Corp. yesterday sought an injunction in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia to block Conrail Inc. from postponing its scheduled Dec. 23 shareholders meeting. At the meeting, Conrail shareholders will be asked to vote on whether to opt out of a provision of the Pennsylvania anti-takeover law. If they vote in the affirmative, that would, effectively, clear the way for the Philadelphia freight rail company to merge with CSX Corp., of Richmond. Conrail has said that if it does not get enough votes to clear the merger at the meeting, it may postpone the vote, or hold another one. In its motion, Norfolk Southern, which has launched a hostile bid for Conrail, accused Conrail and CSX of "subverting the processes of corporate democracy.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
ACTIVIST Kati Sipp and Comcast customers won't have a public forum this year to grill Comcast CEO Brian Roberts. Comcast Corp. has scrapped its traditional annual shareholder meeting, the site of protests over the Time Warner Cable deal and other issues, for an Internet-based, "virtual" shareholder meeting. The company, which earned $8.2 billion in profits and paid its top six executives $176 million in 2015, said the online shareholder meeting will save Comcast on meeting costs at the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By David Koenig and Joshua Freed, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shareholders at Continental Airlines Inc. and UAL Corp. approve a deal to form the world's biggest airline. Continental officials announced preliminary results of voting during a shareholder meeting Friday in Houston. United shareholders approved it at a meeting near Chicago. The votes clear the way for the $3 billion stock swap to close in about two weeks. It likely will be some time before passengers notice much difference when they fly Continental or United. The combined airline will be called United and based in United's hometown of Chicago, run by Continental's CEO.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Time Warner Cable Inc., the nation's second-largest cable-TV company, will hold its annual shareholder meeting Thursday in New York, and the proposed $45.2 billion merger with Comcast Corp. is not part of the agenda. The meeting follows a tumultuous year at Time Warner Cable in which the company lost hundreds of thousands of cable-TV customers and then became a target of an unfriendly takeover by Charter Communications Inc. Comcast, the nation's largest cable-TV operator, negotiated a friendly all-stock deal to acquire Time Warner Cable that was announced in February.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's trademark inflatable union rat, which showed up Thursday outside the Northeast Philadelphia corporate headquarters of Crown Holdings Inc., might be local, but the union protest at the $8.6 billion company's annual meeting was strictly global. Organizing the protest were members of a Canadian local of the United Steelworkers union, based in Pittsburgh. The local has been on strike since September at Crown's plant near Toronto. In Turkey, meanwhile, a similar rally, no doubt minus the rat, was canceled, the union said, after an Istanbul paper printed what it said was Crown's threat to shut the factory if a rally occurred.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1989 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
The New York investment group that is pursuing a hostile takeover of Pennwalt Corp. yesterday flatly rejected the company's offer to open its confidential books. A spokesman for the group, Centaur Partners, said the proposed confidentiality offer had been turned down because it contained an unreasonable request to cease action on its tender offer. Centaur has been asking to peek at the top-secret books since June, when it began to amass stock in the giant Philadelphia chemical company.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2009 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. has no plans to sell its majority ownership stakes in the Sixers and Flyers because of the weak economy, chief executive officer Brian L. Roberts said in response to a question at the cable company's annual shareholder meeting yesterday morning. He noted that the company has about $31 billion in debt, which it can pay off over 15 years. Comcast welcomed new leadership at the Federal Communications Commission, Roberts said, adding that he believed the company would have a dialogue with government officials about product bundling and the evolution of technology.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1988 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
When most teen-agers say all they want is to be heard, they're referring to their parents. But when 17-year-old Samuel Yake of Paoli talks about being heard, he's referring to corporate executives and board members. Yake is a budding gadfly. As a gadfly, he is a member of a select army of company stockholders who pester captains of commerce and industry to be more concerned with the rights and interests of shareowners. "Management reigns supreme," said the Conestoga High School senior.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 28, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Activist Kati Sipp and Comcast customers won't have a public forum this year to grill Comcast CEO Brian Roberts. Comcast Corp. has scrapped its traditional annual shareholder meeting, the site of protests over the Time Warner Cable deal and other issues, for an Internet-based, "virtual" shareholder meeting. The company, which earned $8.2 billion in profits and paid its top six executives $176 million in 2015, said the online shareholder meeting will save Comcast on meeting costs at the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
ACTIVIST Kati Sipp and Comcast customers won't have a public forum this year to grill Comcast CEO Brian Roberts. Comcast Corp. has scrapped its traditional annual shareholder meeting, the site of protests over the Time Warner Cable deal and other issues, for an Internet-based, "virtual" shareholder meeting. The company, which earned $8.2 billion in profits and paid its top six executives $176 million in 2015, said the online shareholder meeting will save Comcast on meeting costs at the Kimmel Center.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. shareholders approved on Wednesday the all-stock, $45.2 billion proposed acquisition of beleaguered Time Warner Cable Inc., with 99.6 percent of the votes cast saying the takeover should go through. Based on the deal, Time Warner Cable shareholders would receive 2.875 Comcast shares for each Time Warner Cable share. For example, a Time Warner Cable shareholder with 100 shares would receive 287 Comcast shares. Time Warner Cable shareholders will vote on the plan to merge the nation's largest and second-largest cable companies Thursday morning in New York City.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Time Warner Cable Inc. shareholders met on a soggy Thursday morning here, a couple blocks off Columbus Circle, to hear chief executive Robert D. Marcus say he considers that the company's dismal 2013 performance is "old news," and that its proposed $45.2 billion acquisition by Comcast Corp. in an all-stock transaction is a "dream combination. " The sedate affair contained none of the drama that marked the Comcast shareholders' May gathering in Philadelphia, which was disrupted by about 50 protesters opposing the merger of the nation's two largest cable companies because of anti-competitive concerns and media concentration.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Time Warner Cable Inc., the nation's second-largest cable-TV company, will hold its annual shareholder meeting Thursday in New York, and the proposed $45.2 billion merger with Comcast Corp. is not part of the agenda. The meeting follows a tumultuous year at Time Warner Cable in which the company lost hundreds of thousands of cable-TV customers and then became a target of an unfriendly takeover by Charter Communications Inc. Comcast, the nation's largest cable-TV operator, negotiated a friendly all-stock deal to acquire Time Warner Cable that was announced in February.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. held an uneventful shareholders meeting Wednesday, during which chief executive Brian Roberts reiterated his sentiment that he was "extremely excited" about a proposed merger with Time Warner Cable Inc., and unionized Comcast technicians pressured the company to improve its treatment of them. The Chicago union, one of the few recognized by Comcast, is negotiating a new contract. Roberts said the meeting was not the venue for bargaining. After the meeting at the Kimmel Center, about 50 antimerger protesters on the sidewalk chanted "Comcast has the tower and the people have the power," calling it a peoples' vote on the merger.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several groups plan to protest the Comcast Corp. shareholders meeting Wednesday morning, saying that Comcast's deal to acquire Time Warner Cable Inc. would be bad for consumers. About 100 people have indicated that they would participate in a demonstration outside the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts on the 300 block of South Broad Street, organizers said Tuesday. The Comcast shareholders meeting is to begin at 9 a.m. in the Perelman Theater. Doors are to open at 8. Consumers Union, Free Press, and Common Cause are among the organizations sending officials, said Hannah Sassaman, policy director for the Media Mobilizing Project in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's trademark inflatable union rat, which showed up Thursday outside the Northeast Philadelphia corporate headquarters of Crown Holdings Inc., might be local, but the union protest at the $8.6 billion company's annual meeting was strictly global. Organizing the protest were members of a Canadian local of the United Steelworkers union, based in Pittsburgh. The local has been on strike since September at Crown's plant near Toronto. In Turkey, meanwhile, a similar rally, no doubt minus the rat, was canceled, the union said, after an Istanbul paper printed what it said was Crown's threat to shut the factory if a rally occurred.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2013 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
NEW YORK - McDonald's once again faced criticism at its annual shareholder meeting Thursday that it is a purveyor of junk food that markets to children. The world's biggest hamburger chain has been looking to keep up with changing tastes as people increasingly opt for foods they feel are fresh or healthy. Customers can now order egg whites in its breakfast sandwiches, for example. McDonald's also recently introduced chicken wraps to go after people in their 20s and 30s looking for better-for-you options.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
About a dozen tea party activists from the Philadelphia area gathered outside the Kimmel Center on Wednesday - site of Comcast Corp.'s annual shareholders' meeting - to protest the company's ownership of the liberal-leaning MSNBC 24-hour cable news channel. Inside the meeting, shareholders peppered Comcast chief executive officer Brian Roberts about the company's decision to ban local gun-shop advertisements. There were also complaints about the Rev. Al Sharpton, host of PoliticsNation on MSNBC.
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