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Sharia Law

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NEWS
December 21, 2011
Osama bin Laden is dead, al-Qaeda is reeling, Middle East dictators are deposed seemingly every other Tuesday, and yet, in the fevered and delirious minds of far too many of our elected leaders, the United States is forever on the verge of becoming just another province in the ever-expanding Muslim caliphate. Never mind that the last actual caliph lost that title back in 1922, when the Ottoman Empire dissolved. Or that most estimates put the Muslim population of the United States at less than 1 percent.
NEWS
October 20, 2010
SO NOW the terrorists win if a Canadian Muslim can buy a can of tomato soup. Conservative bloggers are calling for a boycott of Camden-based Campbell Soup Co. because it now produces (in Canada, not here) 15 varieties of soup that have been certified halal - that is, conforming with Muslim dietary laws. It's yet another alarming development in the so- far-successful political strategy of exploiting ignorance and fear of Islam. It joins last summer's roiling controversy over a proposed Islamic cultural center a few New York blocks from Ground Zero and the crazy Florida minister's threat to publicly burn a Quran.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rabbi, an interfaith leader, and a Temple University professor joined the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) on Wednesday to denounce as "Islamophobic" a Pennsylvania bill they say is an attack on sharia law, which is followed by devout Muslims. House Bill 2029, introduced by Rep. Rosemarie Swanger (R., Lebanon), says state courts shall not, in deciding cases, "consider a foreign legal code or system" that lacks "the same fundamental liberties" as the state and federal Constitutions.
NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The epidemic pledge business is not merely a Republican presidential gambit but also, I suspect, a way of getting the electorate to pay attention to candidates who don't seem to be performing any meaningful work on a daily basis. I'm talking about you, Michele Bachmann, and, also you, Rick Santorum. For those keeping count, Bachmann and Santorum have signed multiple pledges to be faithful to their spouses, oppose same-sex marriage, reject Sharia law (was this a problem here?
NEWS
October 20, 2010 | By JANET STOBART, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - After 90 minutes of deliberation, a British jury yesterday found a Saudi prince guilty of murdering a manservant who died of head injuries early this year. Saud Abdulaziz bin Nasser al Saud, grandson of Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah, was convicted of murder and grievous bodily harm in the death of Bandar Abdulaziz, who was found dead in bed at London's elegant Landmark Hotel on Feb. 15. The victim had suffered broken ribs and bruises to his head and body, and there were signs of brain injuries, strangulation and bite marks to the cheek, the jury heard.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
RICK SANTORUM didn't wait to be asked. The day the conservative Christian organization Family Leader announced its defense-of-marriage pledge, Santorum called to ask where he could sign. Even so, he managed to be only the second signer. Michele Bachmann was first to send back her signed document. Neither was in as big a rush to clarify their position after learning that they had signed a pledge stating that black children were more likely to be raised in a two-parent home during slavery than they are "after the election of the U.S.A's first African American president.
NEWS
September 10, 2010
RE ANDREW J. Dankanich's letter on PHA Director Carl Greene: As the trite but true saying goes, you're entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts. It's not just Philly's pay-to-play culture, nor the behavior of Carl Greene - it's both and then some. Had you worked for Greene as so many of us did, you'd understand. Greene's questionable behavior was, indeed, effectively covered up. But it helped to have occurred in a culture that cares more about material results than the people who bring them about: workers.
NEWS
April 22, 2009 | By Trudy Rubin
Nuclear-armed Pakistan is drifting toward disaster. Ever larger chunks of the country are being taken over by radical Islamists, with a government and army that seem to lack the will, or the ability, to push back. These Islamists - a network of Pakistani Taliban, tribal groups, jihadis trained to fight in Afghanistan and Kashmir, and plain thugs - are not all-powerful. They could have been stopped. They could still be stopped. But that would require a government with sufficient legitimacy and guts to stand up to the militants - and to convince a confused public that these groups threaten the state.
NEWS
June 26, 2006 | By Charles Krauthammer
In the Australian House of Representatives last month, opposition member Julia Gillard interrupted a speech by the minister of health thusly: "I move that that sniveling grub over there be not further heard. " For that, the good woman was ordered removed from the House, if only for a day. She might have escaped that little time-out if she had responded to the speaker's demand for an apology with something other than "If I have offended grubs, I withdraw unconditionally. " God, I love Australia.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
DOHA, Qatar — As the Arab Spring morphs into a hot Arab summer, activists around the region are debating whether Islamist parties and democracy can mix. Given the triumph of religious parties in parliamentary elections in Tunisia and Egypt, and the lead roles taken by Islamists in Libya, Yemen, and the Syrian opposition, Arab human rights activists have become increasingly nervous that their revolution will be hijacked. Nowhere is that debate more intense than in Egypt, where the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate is one of two finalists in presidential elections set for June 15 and 16. The Brotherhood already won 47 percent of the parliamentary seats in November; its success stems from its tight organization and loyal core of supporters.
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NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
To outside observers, Egypt appears to be sliding toward a new authoritarianism, this time under an Islamist ruler. The current struggle is over a referendum on a new constitution, and whether it's a prelude to a future political takeover by Islamist groups. Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi, a man of the Muslim Brotherhood, says the document must be put to a two-stage vote, on Dec. 15 and Dec. 22, to speed the transition to full democracy. Morsi's opponents believe the document contains dangerous loopholes.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
DOHA, Qatar — As the Arab Spring morphs into a hot Arab summer, activists around the region are debating whether Islamist parties and democracy can mix. Given the triumph of religious parties in parliamentary elections in Tunisia and Egypt, and the lead roles taken by Islamists in Libya, Yemen, and the Syrian opposition, Arab human rights activists have become increasingly nervous that their revolution will be hijacked. Nowhere is that debate more intense than in Egypt, where the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate is one of two finalists in presidential elections set for June 15 and 16. The Brotherhood already won 47 percent of the parliamentary seats in November; its success stems from its tight organization and loyal core of supporters.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Last week, a Muslim Brotherhood delegation from Egypt came to Washington to convince skeptics that Islam and democracy can coexist. The question of what Islamist political parties will do after they take power is central to the Mideast's future. Such parties have won elections in Tunisia and Egypt, and look likely to take power in Libya and, ultimately, in Syria. Egypt, with its large population and peace treaty with Israel, is the crucial test case. The visiting Egyptians, all members of the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party, were clearly on a mission: to portray themselves as moderates, who embrace pluralism and democracy - and are open for business.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
Jonathan Turley is a professor of public interest law at George Washington University The recent exchange between an atheist and a judge in a small courtroom in rural Pennsylvania could have come out of a Dickens novel. Magisterial District Judge Mark Martin was hearing a case in which an irate Muslim stood accused of attacking an atheist, Ernest Perce, because he was wearing a "Zombie Muhammad" costume on Halloween. Although the judge had "no doubt that the incident occurred," he dismissed the charge of criminal harassment against the Muslim and proceeded to browbeat Perce.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Jon Pahl
What's so scary about sharia? According to a recent federal appeals court decision, not much. A 10th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruling this month effectively blocks implementation of Oklahoma's "Save Our State" constitutional amendment. Passed by 70 percent of the state's voters in 2010, the measure "forbids courts from considering or using sharia" - Islamic legal principles - as well as "international law. " Similar laws have been enacted in Tennessee and Louisiana, and legislation is pending in at least 20 states.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
Osama bin Laden is dead, al-Qaeda is reeling, Middle East dictators are deposed seemingly every other Tuesday, and yet, in the fevered and delirious minds of far too many of our elected leaders, the United States is forever on the verge of becoming just another province in the ever-expanding Muslim caliphate. Never mind that the last actual caliph lost that title back in 1922, when the Ottoman Empire dissolved. Or that most estimates put the Muslim population of the United States at less than 1 percent.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rabbi, an interfaith leader, and a Temple University professor joined the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) on Wednesday to denounce as "Islamophobic" a Pennsylvania bill they say is an attack on sharia law, which is followed by devout Muslims. House Bill 2029, introduced by Rep. Rosemarie Swanger (R., Lebanon), says state courts shall not, in deciding cases, "consider a foreign legal code or system" that lacks "the same fundamental liberties" as the state and federal Constitutions.
NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The epidemic pledge business is not merely a Republican presidential gambit but also, I suspect, a way of getting the electorate to pay attention to candidates who don't seem to be performing any meaningful work on a daily basis. I'm talking about you, Michele Bachmann, and, also you, Rick Santorum. For those keeping count, Bachmann and Santorum have signed multiple pledges to be faithful to their spouses, oppose same-sex marriage, reject Sharia law (was this a problem here?
NEWS
July 12, 2011
RICK SANTORUM didn't wait to be asked. The day the conservative Christian organization Family Leader announced its defense-of-marriage pledge, Santorum called to ask where he could sign. Even so, he managed to be only the second signer. Michele Bachmann was first to send back her signed document. Neither was in as big a rush to clarify their position after learning that they had signed a pledge stating that black children were more likely to be raised in a two-parent home during slavery than they are "after the election of the U.S.A's first African American president.
NEWS
May 8, 2011
Dear Sam: This will be the last letter I write you. I don't think they have newspapers where you are. I first wrote you nearly 10 years ago on that cloudless blue Tuesday morning when 19 men under your command hijacked four airliners. They crashed two into the towers of the World Trade Center, one into the side of the Pentagon, and the last into a field near Shanksville, Pa. Nearly 3,000 people died that day, and I remember being numb with the weight of it all. I didn't even know your name at the time, so I addressed myself to a monster, a beast, a bastard - which, it turns out, was an accurate salutation.
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